Author Topic: James Henry Cropper  (Read 6282 times)

IanC

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James Henry Cropper
« on: December 18, 2012, 06:15:10 AM »
Greetings from Australia!
I'm currently researching the Cropper family tree and came across your forum when I was digging up more information on my paternal grandfather, James Henry Cropper. James was born in Manchester in 1880. He enlisted with the Manchester Regiment in January 1898 - here's a quick synopsis:
·         Private James Henry Cropper (6199) enlisted with the 6th Manchester Regiment on January 10, 1898. He was ‘attested’ for six years.
·         He was 18 years of age and his military file records that he stood five foot four and a half inches tall, weighed 118lbs and had a 32 and a half inch chest. He was described as having a fresh complexion, grey eyes and light brown hair. He had a small scar on the back of his right hand.
·         He received 49 days of basic training.
·         James was promoted to Corporal on 4 May 1900 and joined ‘embodiment’ on the same day.
·         January 6, 1902 – promoted to Lance-Corporal. Also says he was promoted to sergeant on the same day....which sounds odd.
·         He was paid a war gratuity in accordance with army order No 5 of 1901 (does this confirm he served in South Africa?).
·         He was 'disembodied' on 9 January, 1904.

At the outbreak of WWI, he re-enlisted on 16 August 1914.
·         He was 34 years and 160 days old.
·         He lived with his wife and seven children at 44 Manchester Street. Salford.
·         His previous service with the 6th Manchester Regiment is noted on the enlistment form – as was the agreed length of service: “For the period of one year with the Colours or, if the war lasts longer, for the duration of the war”.
·         James Henry Cropper’s army number was 2518. On 4 February, 1915 he was promoted to Lance-Sergeant and posted to the 11th (Service) Battalion. He was promoted to Sergeant a month later on 31 March, 1915.

He served in Gallipoli where he was wounded in the knee. He then served in France where he was gassed (December 11 1917 at Ypres). It's believed this contributed to his relatively early death at the age of 50 in 1930 when my dad was 8 years old.
He steadily rose through the ranks and on 20 June 1919 he was promoted to Warrant Officer Class II 'replacing RQMS Anderton who was being demobilised'. James Henry Cropper returned to England on 30 November 1919 and was demobilised at the end of December.
My particular area of interest is his service during the Boer War given that I have fairly detailed information about his service in WW1. If anyone can point me in the right direction, it would be much appreciated.

Regards,
Ian Cropper

« Last Edit: January 04, 2013, 11:01:00 PM by harribobs »

sphinx

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Re: Greetings all!
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2012, 08:02:05 AM »
Ian,

He served in South Africa in 1902 with the 6th Militia Battalion.

He was awarded the Queens South Africa Medal with 3 clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State and South Africa 1902.

There should be a potted history of the 6th in South Africa on the site already for your information.

regards

Offline mack

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Re: Greetings all!
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2012, 08:17:02 AM »
hiya ian.
when he enlisted in WW1,he was working for the manchester ship canal company,hes on their roll of honour.

mack ;D

Offline Wendi

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Re: Greetings all!
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2012, 12:18:09 PM »
There should be a potted history of the 6th in South Africa on the site already for your information.

Sphinx there isn't...........any volunteers  :D

Wendi  ;)
"Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it!  No matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and with your own common sense" ~ Buddha

Offline Bob.NB

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Re: Greetings all!
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2012, 01:23:46 PM »
6th Battalion
Following the outbreak of the Boer War in 1899, Army Order 50 of March 1900 announced the increase of six regiments of infantry by two line battalions to be numbered the 3rd and 4th battalions respectively.  The Manchester Regiment was one of those Regiments selected and, as a consequence, the existing 3rd and 4th (Militia) Battalions were renumbered as the 5th and 6th battalions. Both battalions volunteered for service in South Africa.
The 6th (Militia) Battalion arrived in South Africa in March 1902 and took over the blockhouse line between Jagersfontein and Achterlong, later extending to Tweedale. The battalion returned to England on 4th September 1902 when the battalion was immediately disembodied.
Bob B

IanC

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Re: Greetings all!
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2012, 06:25:10 AM »
Thanks to everyone who responded to my post. You have solved a mystery and 'family legend' that I've been aware of since I was a kid....and that was a long time ago! The other part of the family legend was that James won the George Cross or George Medal at some point during his military service, but I haven't been able to find out anything. My dad also said that when James Henry Cropper died in November 1930, his funeral carriage was provided with a military escort. He described it very vividly, but he was only eight at the time! My email address for anyone who wants to share anecdotes and information is on my profile page or you could  just pm me, I have quite a bit of material (mainly WWI) - largely plagerised from websites and written histories, so not for publication - that I've pulled together over the years, but am quite happy to share on a personal basis.

Regards,
IanC
« Last Edit: December 19, 2012, 08:43:14 AM by tonyrod »

Offline george.theshed197

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Re: Greetings all!
« Reply #6 on: December 19, 2012, 09:58:25 AM »
Good morning and welcome Ian to the Forum,
You will have to start delving into the London Gazette in respect of the possible award in respect of any medal associated with your family, currently it would appear that he was entitled  to the QSA with seemingly 3 clasps.
Your mention of the George  Cross or Medal I regret to advise is way out - that did not come into existence until the 24 September 1940 when it was instituted by King George VI; the lads will search elsewhere no doubt for you.
All the best for Christmas and the New Year.
George.

Offline Wendi

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Re: Greetings all!
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2012, 10:29:15 AM »
My dad also said that when James Henry Cropper died in November 1930, his funeral carriage was provided with a military escort.
Regards,
IanC

Ian it might be worth looking at the local paper for the period, they were often hot on photos of such events.

Wendi  :)
"Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it!  No matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and with your own common sense" ~ Buddha