Author Topic: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919  (Read 160348 times)

MMROLL

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THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« on: December 19, 2009, 04:03:36 PM »
I have been working on this Roll since 1997.In 2003 Chris Bate,and myself were advised by William Spencer that the Original MM Cards were available to us as the MOD wished to dispose of them.We went to Hayes and collected approx 118,000 cards in 45 large boxes.Since then the card info has been transferred to disc and work is concluding on entering the info from the back of the cards onto the nominal roll.The Roll will contain the following details..NAME/RANK/NUMBER/BATTALION OR SUB UNIT/L/G DATE/CASUALTY DETAILS ,CWG,SOLDIERS DIED/IF COMMISSIONED DETAILS, DATE COMMISSIONED/NOTES IF ANY FROM BACK OF CARD/REG PAPER AND SCHEDULE NUMBERS/BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS IF AVAILABLE/and finally CITATIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS taken from literally hundreds of sources.Currently I have accumulated over 20,000 recommendations which are currently being laid on the Roll. I have all the AIF CITATIONS,and am on the trail of the CANADIANS about 8000 in all.Anyway this is where my appeal to you comes in.I need any citations/ info on awards plus photos of recipients and copies of MM documentation, DIV.gallantry cards etc.Already on the Roll are AIF/25th Div/29th div artillery/Notts and Derby/Tank CPS/1/ RWKENT./SOME LONDON REGTS/Men from Burnley/4th N fus/groups sold by DNW,SPINK ,SOTHEBY AND OTHERS SINCE 1980/ Plus thousands found in miscellaneous documents at the National Archives.The publication date is 2014 at the latest. ALL contributions will be acknowledged on the roll, currently over 100 collectors and researchers have and are contributing.I hope you feel able to help in some way. Particularly needed is someone to trawl Manchester Newspapers for details of awards and recipients,and their photos.Also if you have access to regimental or battalion histories mm award details however sparse are very helpful If you would like to see a sample sheet from the Roll I will email one to you remember tho there will be much more info to go on.If you feel you would like to help with this important project please contact me.EMAIL address is E mail address removed to stop spam    Please use the ICON under the name thank youThanks for reading this and I hope to hear from you,Best wishes, Howard Williamson (author of The Collector and Researchers Guide To The Great War)
« Last Edit: December 20, 2009, 12:17:31 AM by timberman »

Offline kingo

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2009, 04:23:33 PM »
Howard-these are the only 3 that i have found in my somewhat limited collection of documents. They are scans of scans-so the quality is not brilliant-but you are welcome to them if they are any use.
Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans.

Offline kingo

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2009, 04:25:10 PM »
No2
Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans.

Offline kingo

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2009, 04:25:59 PM »
No 3
Life is what happens while you are busy making other plans.

MMROLL

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2009, 08:29:42 PM »
No2
Thanks "KINGO" APPRECIATED,Best wishes, Howard

Offline Pete Th

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2009, 09:01:44 AM »
The following are extracts from a book that I'm co-writing with Neil Drum called "A District At War - Irlam and Cadishead's Part in the Great War." We also have photos of many of these men. Please feel free to use any of this info in your book. In some cases I havent been able to trace the service number or, in one case J. A. Leader, the regiment. If you have any info that could help us trace them, it would be much appreciated:

Military Medallists from Irlam and Cadishead

ADAMS, Walter
Pte 19279. 2nd Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. 24th Brigade, 8th Division.

BRIGGS, George
Private. 6th (Service) Battalion, The Border Regiment. 33 Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division.

BROOKS, Ernest
Private, Lancashire Fusiliers

BROOKS, Frank
Private, The Manchester Regiment.

BROUGHTON, Peter
Private 21962. 17th (Service) Battalion (1st South East Lancashire), Lancashire Fusiliers. 104th Brigade, 35th Division.

COLLINS, William
Private. Service details unknown.

DALE, Roland
Corporal  3420. 13th Battalion, Kings Royal Rifle Corps.
111th Brigade, 37th Division.

DALE, Thomas
Bombardier 38252 Royal Garrison Artillery 17th Siege Battery (Irlam)

FLEMING, John
Private 12357 Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (Irlam)

GIBBON, George William
Sergeant 1131 (later number 250051), 1st/6th Battalion, Manchester Regiment. 127th Brigade, 42nd (East Lancashire) Division.

HOWARTH, Walter
The East Lancashire Regiment, attached Royal Engineers.

JOHNSON, Fred
Private, Artist’s Rifles

JOHNSON, Hubert.
Bombardier L/9896, 400th Battery, 14th Artillery Brigade, The Royal Field Artillery.


LEADER, J. A.
Corporal. Service details unknown.

LLOYD, George
Private, Royal Army Medical Corps.

MAYBURY, Thomas
Gunner 180975 Royal Garrison Artillery 230th Siege Battery (Irlam)

McARTHUR, David
Sergeant  6575. 10th (Service) Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers, 52nd Brigade , 17th (Northern) Division.

MELLOR, Wilfred
Sergeant 108377. 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles.

POTTS, Arthur
Corporal 3534 (Later number 251048). 1st/6th (T.F) Battalion, The Manchester Regiment.  127th Brigade, 42nd (East Lancashire) Division.

POVAH, Thomas
Private 13712. 12th Battalion, The Manchester Regiment. 52nd Brigade, 17th (Northern) Division.

ROYLE, George
Sergeant 19726. 18th (Service) Battalion (2nd South East Lancashire), The Lancashire Fusiliers. 104th Brigade, 35th Division.

SMITH, John
Private. 2nd Battalion, The Sherwood Forester’s (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). 71st Brigade, 6th Division.

STOCKS, Stanley
Company Sergeant Major. King’s Royal Rifle Corps.

TAYLOR, Frederick W.
Sergeant. Royal Garrison Artillery.

UNSWORTH, Fred
Sergeant 19285. 21st Battalion, The Manchester Regiment.  91st Brigade, 7th Division. Awarded the Military Medal and Bar.

WILKES, Samuel
Sergeant 34509. 2nd Battalion, The Manchester Regiment.

YATES, Joseph
Private. The Manchester Regiment.
Remembering

Pte Sidney Lee (36719), 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regt - dow 18.02.17
Sgt Charles Roberts (13668), 11th Bn, Manchester Regiment - kia 18.05.18
Bombardier John Hesford (70065), 147th Heavy Battery, RGA dow - 04.09.18
Pte Sidney Lee (4131324), 8th Bn, Cheshire Regiment -  kia 12.03.41

Offline Pete Th

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2009, 09:03:13 AM »
Walter Howarth

Private Walter Howarth of the East Lancashire Regiment was awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct on the Western Front. He had been recommended for the medal by a subaltern (and Bombing officer) of the Essex Regiment in recognition of services rendered by Walter in the relief of comrades who had been buried by the explosion of a German mine. The rescue involved great danger as most of the trench breastwork had been blown in and the German trench was only 40 yards away. His regiment had been decimated in one of the early engagements on the Somme and Walter was transferred to a Tunnelling Company of the Royal Engineers. The operations he undertook were considerably dangerous as most of the breastwork of the trench had been destroyed and the enemy trench was only 40 yards away.  On the 12th July 1916, Walter wrote:

‘I now take the pleasure of answering your welcome letter and newspaper. I have seen George Mahoney’s photograph in the paper. I consider and think myself a very lucky lad, after what I went through on Sunday night. At 8.25 the Germans blew a mine up; it was one of the biggest explosions that I have been in or seen for some time. We lost eight men through it. I got a shock, but nothing more. At the time I was working in the next mine, and as luck would happen I just came to the top as the candles would not burn. I had only been at the top a few minutes when they blew it up. The bombardment was something awful. Here I came out lucky again. I was hit three times with pieces of shrapnel, but they never fetched blood. It was a good job that one large piece hit me on the thigh with smooth side of shrapnel otherwise it would have taken my leg off. Well, I don’t think that I will ever get killed after that, but I will never forget last Sunday night. I would have written to you sooner, but I did not feel well after the shock. I am now in the best of health. I enclose a piece of ribbon of the Military Medal that I am wearing.’

Walter had had the misfortune of losing both parents at an early age, was brought up by Mrs Haughton of Well Farm, Fiddlers Lane, Irlam. He worked for the CWS for eight years before enlisting in September 1914.

Mr J. E. Green, general manager of the CWS Soap Works made a presentation of a wrist watch and a body shield to Walter Howarth in February 1917. The presentation commemorated the Military Medal that Walter had won during 1916. The body shield was engraved with ‘European War 1914. Presented to Private W. Howarth on the occasion of him winning the Military Medal, by the CWS Irlam staff and employees with congratulations.’ Before the war Walter was employed in the starch department of the works. After the presentation, Walter was given a hearty send-off by his former workmates and the residents of Irlam on his way to the station on his return to France.

Wilfred Mellor
Company Sergeant Major Wilfred Mellor (Service no. 108377) served with the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles (CMR), 8th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division, Canadian Corps, Canadian Expeditionary Force.

Wilfred was born in Saddleworth, Yorkshire on the 9th July 1883, the son of Ben and Hannah Mellor who later resided at 1 Alexandra Grove, Irlam. He grew up in Delph, Yorkshire and served in the Army during the South African war, where he was wounded in the foot. He was married to Cissie (from Milnrow, Rochdale) and they had one child. He was well known in the Irlam and Cadishead district where he resided in the early 1900’s and founded the local Boy Scout movement.

In about 1909, he left England with his brother Herbert and their families for a new life in Canada, where Wilfred joined the Canadian Police in Lethbridge, Alberta. Herbert eventually sent his wife and son home and then followed them back to live in Alexandra Grove, Irlam. Wilfred’s wife and family moved back to Irlam at some point before the war. Two addresses are given for the family; 47 Baines Avenue, Irlam and 1 Alexandra Grove, Irlam.

Wilfred enlisted into the Canadian Expeditionary Force on the 31st December 1914 at Medicine Hat, Alberta. He was 31 ½ years of age, 5 foot 10 ½ inches tall, with brown hair, brown eyes and a fair complexion. He was posted to the 3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles (CMR). On the 14th January 1915 he was promoted Lance Corporal. The 3rd CMR sailed for England on the 12th June 1915 with a strength of 28 officers and 598 other ranks. Between the 16th and 18th August Wilfred went absent without leave whilst the unit was stationed at Shorncliffe camp, he received a punishment of 3 days pay forfeited.

On the 22nd September, the 3rd CMR arrived in France and the next day Wilfred was promoted in the field to Sergeant. On the 2nd January 1916, he transferred to the 2nd CMR, and joined the unit the next day. Between the 10th and 18th February 1916 he managed to get back to Irlam on leave, and then rejoined his unit on the 21st February.

On the 26th May 1916 he won the Military Medal, the first soldier from the district to gain this distinction. He wrote to his mother stating he would explain how it was won when he got home; sadly that was not to be. The unit war diary for the day he was recommended for the medal records that at 4pm the enemy shelled Poperinghe causing a number of casualties. It is likely that he was awarded the medal for a gallant act during this incident. He had also been mentioned in dispatches three times. When his Captain, Captain Coates, was ‘mortally wounded’, Wilfred carried him from the field (the Commonwealth War Graves Commission does not record a Captain Coates, 2nd CMR as a casualty).

Between the 3rd and 4th June 1916, the 2nd CMR were in action in the area of Maple Copse, Belgium and they suffered heavy casualties during intense and concentrated enemy shelling and rifle fire. Wilfred was ‘shell-shocked’ and admitted to No. 10 Casualty Clearing Station, and then to No. 25 General Hospital at Hardelot. On the 23rd June 1916, he was sent to No. 1 Convalescent Depot, Boulogne, and on the 26th June declared fit for duty and sent to the Base Depot. On the 10th August, the award of his Military Medal was announced in the London Gazette.  Two days later he was posted to the 3rd Entrenching Battalion and joined this unit on the 14th August. He remained with them until the 22nd September when he was posted to and rejoined the 2nd CMR.

On the 24th September, the 2nd CMR were resting at Bouzincourt, on the Somme. Later that day they moved to Courcellette. On this day Wilfred was promoted to Acting Company Sergeant Major (paid). On the 26th the Battalion moved to Albert and the next day they took over part of the enemy Zollern and Hessian trench system that had already been captured.

Wilfred was killed in action on 30th September 1916, aged 34, during heavy fighting in the area of Hessian trench, near Courcellette. He is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial.  On the 5th October 1916, his mother received his Military Medal which had been sent by the Canadian records office. He was awarded the Military Medal and ‘15 star trio.’ His father died on 4th February 1907, aged 47 and his mother on 16th February 1951, aged 89.
Remembering

Pte Sidney Lee (36719), 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regt - dow 18.02.17
Sgt Charles Roberts (13668), 11th Bn, Manchester Regiment - kia 18.05.18
Bombardier John Hesford (70065), 147th Heavy Battery, RGA dow - 04.09.18
Pte Sidney Lee (4131324), 8th Bn, Cheshire Regiment -  kia 12.03.41

Offline Pete Th

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2009, 09:04:33 AM »
Fred Unsworth

Sergeant Fred Unsworth (19285) of the 21st Manchester’s (91st Brigade, 7th Division) was awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct. The following is an extract from the Brigade Orders dated 8th February 1917:

‘The Corps Commander has been pleased to award the Military Medal to the undermentioned N.C.O. 19285 Sergt. F. Unsworth of the Manchesters. The Divisional Brigade Commanders wish their congratulations conveyed to the recipient.’

Fred received the medal for releasing a number of horses while under heavy German shell-fire. At the time, there were no commissioned officers near, and being the most senior NCO, he acted on his own initiative. He modestly stated in a letter to his wife that he does not wish to have all the credit, as every man was perfectly willing and ready to assist in releasing the horses, with the result that not one was hurt.

Sergeant Fred Unsworth, of the 21st (Service) Battalion (6th City) of the Manchester Regiment and Roland Dale, The Kings Royal Rifles Corps, had been awarded Military Medals for gallant conduct earlier in the year. At a special function held by the Irlam Urban District Council in October to celebrate the awards, Joseph Cooke stated that Sergeant Fred Unsworth had been in severe engagements in the Somme and Ancre. The 91st Infantry Brigade was stationed at a village when the Germans started a heavy bombardment with long range guns. A large number of horses were removed and some 64 left behind. On 12th December 1916, during a heavy bombardment, he released a number of horses which were held up in a stable. As soon as the horses made good their escape, the stable was completed destroyed by German shells. In January 1917, Colonel W. W. Norman presented Fred with the ribbon, at a ceremony witnessed by the Brigadier General. He was the first solder from Cadishead to gain the Military Medal.

Sergeant Fred Unsworth enlisted with the Transport section of the 6th Battalion of the Manchester Regiment on the 14th November 1914. His parents lived in Hayes Road, Cadishead and he married Miss Annie Hickson, daughter of Fred Hickson of Liverpool Road on 18th September 1915. Her brother, also Fred Hickson, served in the army and was killed in action in November 1916. Fred and Annie set up home together at 59 Fir Street, Cadishead. Fred worked in the crude glycerine department of the CWS and was highly respected in Cadishead. Fred and his wife were well known in the area because of their religious activities. Annie was a Sunday school teacher and a member of the choir of Irlam Wesleyan Church and Fred was a teacher in the Cadishead Wesleyan Sunday school and a local preacher. By 1916 he was serving with the 21st Manchester’s. His brother Frank served with the Royal Garrison Artillery and was killed in action earlier in 1917.

In December 1918 news was received that Sergeant Fred Unsworth of the 21st Battalion of the Manchester Regiment had been awarded the bar to the Military Medal that he had won at Beaumont Hamel in 1917. He gained the bar for carrying ammunition under heavy artillery fire and a mustard gas attack at Asiago in Italy.


George Royle
Sergeant George Royle (19726) of the 18th (Service) Battalion (2nd South East Lancashire) Lancashire Fusiliers, received a gunshot wound to the chest and shoulder on the 15th April. The next day he was admitted to 106 Field Ambulance and to 21 Casualty Clearing Station the same day. On the 21st April he was in hospital at Rouen. George was born in Manchester in 1890. In 1915 he was living with his father, also called George, at 12 Dixon Street, Irlam and worked as a labourer. He enlisted, aged 25 years 4 months, at Salford on 24th May 1915, for the 'Duration of the War'. He was immediately posted to 20th (Service) Battalion (4th Salford), The Lancashire Fusiliers. He transferred to the 22nd Battalion on 4th September 1915, and in the same month he was appointed Lance Corporal (paid) from 2nd October. On the 27th November 1915 he left Whitchurch and travelled to Salisbury where he was posted to 18th (Service) Battalion, 2nd South East Lancashires. This battalion was serving with 104th Brigade, 35th Division. George married his wife, Gladys, at Holcombe Parish Church, Lancashire on 24th December 1915. He embarked at Southampton 29th January 1916 for France, disembarking at Le Havre. On the 17th April 1916 he was promoted to Corporal, then appointed paid Lance Sergeant on the 11th October and promoted to Sergeant on the 2nd March 1917. After recovering from his wounds he rejoined his battalion on the 27th June 1917. Between the 19th February and 5th March 1918 he was in England on leave. He returned to the Western Front on 6th March and remained there until the 16th August. It appears that he was also wounded in June 1918. He had further leave in England between the 17th to 31st August. He transferred to Class Z, Army Reserve on 14th February 1919 and settled at 3 Old Green, Greenmount, Tottington, Bury. George was awarded the Military Medal for his actions at Aveluy Wood and he was also awarded the Belgian Croix de Guerre. On the 7th July 1922 he acknowledged receipt of the 'Pair' and on 25th August 1922 he acknowledged receipt of the 'Diploma Belgian Croix de Guerre'.

John Smith
Private John ‘Jack’ Smith of the Sherwood Foresters was awarded the Military Medal for good work in rallying a working party under heavy shelling on the night of 15th May 1917. While recovering from wounds in hospital in Sunderland, he was presented with the medal by the King who asked him how his wound was getting on and shook hands with him. In a letter to friends in Cadishead he wrote ‘I felt as proud as a peacock when a storm is coming on. I expect to come home shortly on leave and will bring the medal with me.’ John lodged with Mr S. McKay of Whitfield Street, Cadishead and was employed by Mr Motley, coal dealer of Mersey View on Hayes Road, Cadishead.
Remembering

Pte Sidney Lee (36719), 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regt - dow 18.02.17
Sgt Charles Roberts (13668), 11th Bn, Manchester Regiment - kia 18.05.18
Bombardier John Hesford (70065), 147th Heavy Battery, RGA dow - 04.09.18
Pte Sidney Lee (4131324), 8th Bn, Cheshire Regiment -  kia 12.03.41

Offline Pete Th

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2009, 09:05:17 AM »
Walter Adams
During the month, Private Walter Adams (Service no. 19279) of the 2nd Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment, 24th Brigade, 8th Division, received a parchment certificate for gallant conduct and devotion to duty in action during operations east of Ypres on 31st July 1917.

Walter was born in Cadishead in 1874, the son of Benjamin and Caroline Adams. By 1914 Walter was living at 17, Whitfield Street, Cadishead, with his wife, Mary Jane, and their children, William (born 1898), Louie (1900), George (1901), Maggie (c.1904), Harriett (c.1907) Edith (c.1910) and Walter (1914).

He worked for the Manchester Ship Canal Company as a Coal Trimmer at the Partington Coal Basin. Incredibly, although he was forty years old and married with seven children, he volunteered for the Army. He enlisted into the East Lancashire Regiment on the 8th March 1915 becoming Private 19279 Walter Adams.

He first arrived on the Western Front on the 4th August 1915 and joined the 2nd Battalion on the 18th August 1915. The 2nd Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment was part of the 24th Brigade, 8th Division.

Walter served throughout the Battle of the Somme 1916 and in the actions during the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line 1917. By June that year the battalion moved into Belgium and commenced preparation for their part in the forthcoming great offensive, the 3rd Battle of Ypres (sometimes referred to as ‘Third Ypres’ or simply ‘Passchendaele’).

The Regimental history of the East Lancashire Regiment in the Great War states the following for the actions on the 31st July:

‘The Plan for the attack so far as it concerned the 8th Division was as follows:-

The 8th Division on a front of about 1,800 yards with its left on the Ypres-Roulers railway, was the left division of II Corps; the 30th Division was on its right and the 15th Division on its left.

Four separate objectives were given for the first day’s attack, these were: The Blue line immediately east of Bellewaarde lake; the Black line along the crest of Wethoek ridge; the Green line some 1,500 yards east of the Black line; and the Red line still further east of the Broodseinde ridge. The 24th Brigade was only concerned with the Blue and Black lines; the first of these lines consisted of four more or less irregular lines of trenches; the second consisted of only two lines of trenches.

The 23rd and 24th Brigades were detailed to capture both the Blue and the Black lines, and the 25th for the attack on the Green line. On the 24th Brigade front, the right brigade of the Division, the 1st Worcestershire and 2nd Northants were detailed to attack on the Blue line; the 2nd East Lancashire and 1st Sherwood Foresters were detailed to pass through the Blue line when captured, and attack the Black line.

The 2nd East Lancashire, the right battalion of its line, was disposed as follows in three waves:-

First wave: Two platoons of each of ‘D’ and ‘C’ Companies – objective the first trench of the Black line.

Second wave: The two remaining platoons of ‘D’ and ‘C’ Companies to pass through the first trench when captured, to attack the second trench, and consolidate it when captured.

Third wave: Two platoons of ‘A’ Company to pass through both captured trenches and establish an outpost line some 150 yards beyond the captured system. Two Stokes mortars accompanied the first wave, and the officer commanding ‘D’ Company received special instructions with regard to the action to be taken in the event of failure of troops on his right. Two platoons of ‘B’ Company were attached to each of ‘D’ and ‘C’ Company as “moppers-up” and the remaining two platoons of ‘A’ Company were detailed as ‘carriers.’

The attack of the 8th Division was supported by seven brigades of Field Artillery which, reckoning 18-pdrs only, in the barrage gave about one gun to every 14 yards of front; the rate of the movement of the barrage was 100 yards in four minutes. Zero hour for the attack was 3.50 a.m., and troops detailed for the attack on the Black line were ordered to advance from their assembly trenches at such time as would enable them to be close to the protective barrage beyond the Blue line at Zero plus one hour and fifteen minutes.

The Battalion left its billets in Ypres at 9 p.m. on July 30th, and by 1 a.m. on the 31st was in its assembly trenches, the first wave in ‘Wing’ trench, and the second and third waves in ‘Zouave’ trench. Twenty minutes after Zero the battalion advanced in ‘artillery formation’ to the Bellewaarde ridge, and passing through the captured Blue line was formed up ready to attack by 5 a.m. The advance commenced up to time, and the whole of the objective on the battalion front was captured in spite of considerable opposition, especially on the right flank where the left battalion of the 30th Division had been unable to get on.

The enemy made a determined on this flank, but was driven off with heavy loss, a result which was largely due to the courage and initiative of Corporal Hyndman*, who, seeing the attack coming, took his Lewis-gun section well out on the exposed flank and dealt successfully with the enemy. Two further counter attacks were driven off during the day with heavy loss to the enemy; in these attacks Stokes mortars and rifle grenades did great execution. The position was maintained for the rest of that day and the whole of the next under heavy artillery fire and considerable enfilade fire from machine guns and rifles from the right, until the battalion was relieved on the night of August 1st/2nd, and went back to a camp near Ypres. Although the attack on the Green line had not been successful, the action, so far as the battalion was concerned, was satisfactory.... All ranks worked splendidly and were absolutely untiring.’

[*The authors found an article relating to Hyndman’s award of the DCM, Salford City Reporter 8th September 1917, Corporal 14161 Ernest Hyndman lived in Lower Broughton. By 1917 he was 19 and already a veteran of Gallipoli and the Somme.]

So read the 2nd battalion’s war diary following their action in the Battle of Pilkem during the opening of the Third Battle of Ypres, 31st July 1917. Walter was one of the ‘other ranks’ who took part in the attack and received a parchment certificate ‘for gallant conduct and devotion to duty in action during operations east of Ypres’, it read:

‘On arrival at the Black Line, he went forward into a shell hole and shot several hostile snipers who were doing considerable damage to our men. He then found a Lewis gun which was out of action, and putting it in working order made good use of it throughout the day. He dispersed a party of machine gunners who were causing us many casualties, and also carried messages under fire. Signed by the Major General of the Division.’

Walter was appointed a Lance Corporal (Paid) on 31st October 1917. It is believed he was awarded his Military Medal for ‘gallant conduct’ on the 20th November 1917. The circumstances that led to this award is not known, however it is known that the 2nd East Lancashire’s were undertaking a three day stint holding the front line immediately North West of Passchendaele village, during which time they were under gas and artillery bombardment frequently.

On New Year’s Eve 1917 Walter was admitted to a Field Ambulance suffering with ‘trench feet’ and the next day, 1st January 1918, he was admitted to 44 Casualty Clearing Station. He was posted to England on board the ‘St. Patrick’ on the 4th January 1918, the next day he was reverted to Private and was posted on the strength of the East Lancashire’s Regimental Depot. On the same day the Warrington Guardian reported:

“ANOTHER MILITARY MEDALLIST – The wife of Lance Corporal Walter Adams, of the East Lancashires, who lives in Whitfield-street, Cadishead, has received from her husband a letter of congratulations from the Lieutenant-General commanding the division upon the honour conferred upon him by his Majesty the King in awarding him the Military Medal for gallant conduct on the 20th November. No further details have been received. Prior to the war Lance-Corporal Adams was employed by the Manchester Ship Canal Co., as a coal trimmer. It is the second honour he has achieved for a few months ago he was awarded a parchment certificate for ‘gallant conduct and devotion to duty.’ The certificate set forth that during operations on July 31st Lance-Corporal Adams entered a shellhole and shot several hostile snipers who were doing considerable damage. He afterwards found a Lewis Gun, which he turned to good account during the day. He dispersed a party of machine-gunners who were causing considerable casualties, and he also carried messages under fire. Lance-Corporal Adams has a large family, and is well known in the Cadishead district. He is the ninth local soldier to have gained the Military Medal.”

On the 23rd February 1918 the award of his MM was announced in the supplement to London Gazette. On the 11th March 1918 he was posted to Western Command Depot, Knowsley Park. On the 18th July he was posted to the Reserve Unit, joining the 3rd Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment at Saltburn on 28th July 1918.

At his medical board he was recorded as suffering permanent myalgia (he had this problem since 1916) and trench feet (since February, 1918) and discharged 2nd October 1918 to Class P, Army Reserve for employment with the Manchester Ship Canal Company. He was discharged ‘being no longer physically fit for war service’ on 3rd February 1919. He had served 3 years 208 days with the Colours and 125 days in Reserve. Walter returned to his family, and his job as a Coal Trimmer.
Remembering

Pte Sidney Lee (36719), 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regt - dow 18.02.17
Sgt Charles Roberts (13668), 11th Bn, Manchester Regiment - kia 18.05.18
Bombardier John Hesford (70065), 147th Heavy Battery, RGA dow - 04.09.18
Pte Sidney Lee (4131324), 8th Bn, Cheshire Regiment -  kia 12.03.41

Offline Pete Th

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2009, 09:07:15 AM »
Roland Dale

According to a newspaper report the first real engagement that Lance Corporal Roland Dale of the King’s Royal Rifles Corps took part in was the fighting at  Pozieres, and later at High Wood, on the Somme. He also fought at  Beaucourt, near the Ancre, where his Battalion (considerably weakened to 400 men) were the first over the top and captured 800 prisoners. Later during the Battle of Arras (April 1917), Roland’s Battalion was detailed to take about two miles of ground, including the village of Monchy Le Preux. A snowstorm was raging at the time, and the Battalion lost all its officers in the early stages of the attack. Roland took a platoon over the top and cleared the village. He personally killed eight and wounded seven of the enemy, and did good work in clearing the cellars. Roland enlisted on 1st September 1914. He was a friend of Harry Hingston and Joseph Morgan. Before the war Roland resided with his father, Edward Norris Dale, at 43 Lord Street, Cadishead and was employed at the CWS Soap Works.  Four of Roland’s brothers also served, Gunner Robert John Dale, Royal Field Artillery, Sergeant Norris Dale Manchester Regiment, Private James Edward Dale, Manchester Regiment and Private Arthur Dale who in 1917 was in a Training Reserve Battalion.

Sergeant Unsworth and Lance Corporal Dale’s wives each received a beautifully illuminated address from Mr. Brew in a neat English gilt frame. Mr. Brew said the distinctions gained reflected credit and honour on the whole district. A motion was agreed that other local soldiers’ gallantry awards would be similarly recognised. Mr. J. T. Royle (ex-chairman of the council) said the two Cadishead soldiers had been home on leave but the brief furlough did not give time for the presentations to be made. The Reverends R. Martin and W. Hudson, and Councillors Turner, Longden, Hampson, Wadsworth and Mr. Cuthbert delivered brief addresses of congratulation, alluding to the glorious traits of the British soldiers. Mr. George Thomas, J.P. handed copies of the local ‘Souvenir and Official Record’ to the recipients and said the district was proud of the loyalty, devotion to duty and patriotism which had been displayed by all the men who had left their homes to uphold the cause of freedom and righteousness.

Thomas Povah
On the 6th October 1916, news was officially received that Private Thomas Povah of 49 Dixon Street, Irlam had been awarded the Military Medal. He served with the Manchester Regiment. ‘I am in the pink and glad to tell you I have been awarded the Military Medal. Don’t worry about me as I am all right. I don’t think it will be long before I see you all again with a bit of luck.’

Another special meeting of the District Council was held during October to congratulate Private Thomas Povah (service no. 13712) of the 12th Battalion, Manchester Regiment on being awarded the Military Medal during the battle of the Somme in the previous year.

A large gathering including Councillors J. A. Brew JP (Chairman – elected April 1917), A. H. Turner (vice Chairman), J. T. Royle, J. J. Paterson, George Whitfield, F. G. Melville, R. Hampson, the Reverend Dr. Martin (Vicar of Irlam), the Reverend W. Hudson (Wesleyan Minister), Mr. George Thomas JP (President of the Red Cross), Mr. J. Drum and Mr. and Mrs Povah (parents) and other members of the family and friends. Mr. Joseph Cooke (Clerk) stated that Private Povah enlisted on the 6th November 1914 and went out to France on July 27th of the following year. He took part in several engagements on the Belgium front and gained the distinction on the 4th August in the memorable battle at ‘Devil’s’ Wood. He volunteered, along with a comrade from the West Riding Regiment, to carry a message from Brigade headquarters to the commanding officer under heavy shell-fire and returned unscarred though heavy shelling was taking place all the time. Both were recommended for the Military Medal. Povah was wounded by a stray shell after he had delivered the message and spent six weeks in hospital. Since returning to the front, he had taken part in several engagements on the Somme and Arras fronts. He had previously been wounded in February 1916 at the ‘Bluff’ near Hill 60 and subsequently spent two months in hospital.

A resolution of congratulation was unanimously passed and Private Thomas Povah, accompanied by his parents, was handed a beautifully illuminated address in an English gilt frame. The Chairman said the district was very proud of all their local soldiers and delighted to know that several of them had gained distinguished honours on the field. Several other congratulatory addresses were delivered, and Mr. George Thomas, J.P., on behalf of the Red Cross Committee, handed Thomas a morocco-bound copy of the ‘Souvenir and Roll of Honour.’ The Chairman said that it was a great honour to have the privilege of actually pinning the Military Medal on the breast of a local soldier (Fred Unsworth and Roland Dale had been on active service and therefore unable to attend the similar presentation mentioned above).

The Chairman went on to day that the district was proud of all such men, indeed they were glad to know that the district had responded so nobly to the call to arms in defence of the most sacred and righteous cause possible. The toll of the war was heavy – Irlam and Cadishead had suffered greatly in soldiers being killed – but the cause was a noble one and he was sure they were all agreed the war must be fought to a conclusion which would prevent a repetition of such horrors for all time. They were honoured by the presence of Private Povah and the distinction he had won. He hoped his life would be spared and that the district would soon have him and many other soldiers back in their midst again.

The medal, which was pinned on Private Povah’s left breast amid much applause, was of Silver and contained the words ‘For Gallantry in the Field’ on one side and an excellent representation of the King. The rim contained the name of the soldier and his regiment.

 Mr J. Drum stated that he had known Thomas Povah for many years and had always found him to be a most estimable young man. He would never forget the time he joined up. He said at the time that he would strive to do his duty, and he had done so, nobly. He repeated the hope expressed by the Chairman that Thomas’ life would be spared and hoped further distinctions awaited him.

The Reverend Dr. Martin said they were proud of all the young men who had joined up, and sympathised with greatly with the widows and parents who had lost those near and dear to him. He agreed with the Chairman that the cause of the Allies was a noble and righteous one. The evening would be long remembered by Private Povah and his parents. Reverend Hudson rejoiced to think that the district had done so well and regretted greatly the losses which had been sustained. He believed that it would, however, be a consolation to the bereaved to know that their dear ones had fallen in a righteous cause.

Councillors Royle, Turner, Hampson and Paterson added their appreciation of Private Povah’s devotion to duty. Mr. George Thomas JP said thanks were due to the military for allowing the opportunity of honouring a local soldier and he hoped to see a permanent memorial erected in the district sooner or later. He thought the war might be over earlier than many people thought and he hoped the proposed memorial scheme would be heartily taken on. He himself would subscribe £10 and it was hoped a substantial sum would be raised by the sale of the Souvenir and Roll of Honour. Private Povah acknowledged the kind remarks which had been spoken and said he would continue to do his duty when he returned to the front. He was hopeful of winning the Victoria Cross.

Private Thomas Povah lived at 49 Dixon Street, Irlam. He was described as a sturdy football player. Before he enlisted he was employed at the new rope works of Messrs. Millington and Sheldrick of Irlam. He had first arrived in France on the 28th July 1915. As well as the Military Medal, he was also awarded the ‘15 Star Trio.’
Remembering

Pte Sidney Lee (36719), 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regt - dow 18.02.17
Sgt Charles Roberts (13668), 11th Bn, Manchester Regiment - kia 18.05.18
Bombardier John Hesford (70065), 147th Heavy Battery, RGA dow - 04.09.18
Pte Sidney Lee (4131324), 8th Bn, Cheshire Regiment -  kia 12.03.41

Offline Pete Th

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2009, 09:09:17 AM »
George Briggs
Private George Briggs (Service no. 17663) of the Border Regiment was awarded the Military Medal in November. The news of the medal award was conveyed in a letter George sent to his mother at 11 Preston Avenue, Irlam, although he did not give any details of how he came to gain the distinction. He explained to his mother that he was in the best of health and had just received a letter from his brother, Harry, who was in a different part of the line.
 
Most of the letter was crossed out by the censor who showed some compassion by stating that he ‘… was delighted that Private Briggs had just been awarded the Military Medal for Gallantry.’ The following is an extract from the letter:

‘I am a long way from him now, and it may be months before I go up that part again. I hope the next time we meet him will be in England. I didn’t think that November morning three years ago this war would last so long, and I didn’t think I should be able to stick it for over two years out here. But I am still going on, and as fit as ever I was, so don’t trouble yourself about me, as I never say die. Cheer up and may the war soon be over, and all of us back home again.’

Before the war George worked in the Starch department of the CWS Soap Works.  He was the eighth employee of the works to be awarded the Military Medal. George had enlisted with the Lancashire Fusiliers on the 14th November 1914 and disembarked at France on the 14th July 1915. He later transferred to the Border Regiment. In 1917, George was granted special leave from the Army to marry his sweetheart who lived in Chapel Road, Irlam. At the end of the war he was transferred to Class Z, Army Reserve and, in addition to the Military Medal, he awarded the '15 Star trio.' After the war he lived with his wife at 1 Marlborough Avenue, Irlam.

Fred Taylor
News was received that Sergeant Frederick W. Taylor of the Royal Garrison Artillery had been awarded the Military Medal which he had received for gallantry near Hill 60. He was in charge of a party who effected communication by way of running a telephone line to the guns under heavy fire from the enemy. This was prior to the infantry going ‘over the top’ on the 7th June 1917. On 20th September 1917 his officer had said that he was further going to recommend him for a bar to his medal for similar gallantry, sadly the officer was killed shortly after. Fred was home on leave in December 1917 and, at lunchtime on the 21st December, he visited the dining room at the CWS Soap Works where the General Manager, Mr. J. E. Green, presented him with a body shield and silver wrist watch as a token of appreciation of the honour he had gained. The dining room had been decorated for the occasion and many of the staff were present and gave Fred a hearty welcome. The same evening he  attended a ceremony at the Irlam District Council offices. Mr. J.A. Brew, J.P (Chairman of the council) pinned the Military Medal to Fred’s chest, and wished him ‘God’s speed.’ Mr. George Thomas JP, president of the local Red Cross, presented him with a morocco bound copy of the local souvenir and Roll of Honour.

George William Gibbon
Sergeant George William Gibbon (Service no. 250051) of the Manchester Regiment was awarded the Military Medal. The citation for his medal read as follows:

‘For continuous great devotion to duty at all times under the most trying conditions from March 24th 1918 until 7th April 1918. This NCO was personally responsible for getting rations, water and supplies up to the Battalion and on many occasions the enemy shelling was very intense. By his coolness and utter disregard for personal safety he inspired the men under his charge. The above period was while the Battalion was in action in the vicinity of Buquoy.’

In a letter to his wife, George stated: ‘We stood for two hours in one place but it was worth it all. We got the General’s salute, and then a march past. I can tell you it was a sight worth seeing. It was read out what we received our medals for and I am going to send it on to you. I got it for doing my duty.’

George was a long serving Territorial before the war, having enlisted on the 16th July 1909. As a result he was one of the first from the district to be called up. He rejoined the 1st/6th Manchesters at Heaton Park on the 5th August 1914. He was a member of the Transport Section of the Battalion and saw active service in Egypt (twice) and Gallipoli. He also spent some time in Malta. He went to France in March 1917.

By 1918 he had not been home for 3 years. In addition to the Military Medal, George was awarded the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal and the ’15 Star Trio’. The Territorial Efficiency Medal was awarded for long service in the Territorial Forces. The criteria were for a minimum of 12 years service with war service counting double. George received one red chevron and four blue chevrons, which were awarded for each year of overseas service, with the red chevron signifying that he served overseas before 31st December 1914. He also had a ‘wound stripe’ showing that at some point in his service he had been wounded. He later served with ‘B’ Company of the 12th Manchester’s (52nd Brigade, 17th Division).

George was born in 1890. His father was a well known Irlam farmer and before the war, George worked on his father’s farm, Moorfield Farm, and he lived with his wife at 300 Liverpool Road, Irlam. His name was on the Irlam Wesleyan Roll of Honour.

Peter Broughton
Private Peter Broughton (service no. 21962) of the 20th (4th Salford) (Service) Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers was awarded the Military Medal for bravery during the battle of Courtrai in October 1918. Peter was on bombing duty on 4th October 1918, at a small village to the left of Menin (near Ypres, Belgium). His bombing of a number of cellars in which some Germans were hiding resulted in thirteen coming out with their hands up.

Peter was born in Norton, Cheshire (c.1896) and educated at Daresbury School. He was employed as a crane driver at the Steelworks and resided, with his mother, Frances, at 24 Dixon Street, Irlam. He enlisted at Eccles on 17th July 1915 at the age of 19 years 37 days. On the 7th August 1915 he was posted from Pendleton to Conway, where he was stationed until 1st September. He was then posted to Salisbury where he remained until being posted to France on the 29th January 1916. 

On the 6th February 1918 Peter was posted to ‘Y’ Company, 17th (Service) (1st South East Lancashire) Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers (104th Brigade, 35th Division). His specialist military trade was a bomber. He had leave in England between the 3rd and 18th February 1918 and then returned to France and served on the Western Front. On the 14th October 1918 he received a gunshot wound to his left leg. Three days later he returned to the UK and was admitted to the Bradford War Hospital where he remained a patient until 30th January 1919 when he transferred to the Dispersal Hospital at Dewsbury. He transferred to Class Z, Army Reserve on the 4th March 1919. His Military Medal was reported in the London Gazette on the 17th June 1919 and he acknowledged receipt of the medal on the 31st December 1919. Military Medal and ‘Pair.’

Peter’s father, Henry, was an ex-soldier who had fought in the Burma war with the Cheshire Regiment (both Battalions of the regiment served in Burma between 1887 to 1891). Henry served in the Royal Engineers during the First World War.

Hubert Johnson
News was received that Bombardier Hubert Johnson (L/9896) of the Royal Field Artillery 400th Battery, 14th Artillery Brigade had been awarded the Military Medal for ‘sticking to his gun after all his pals had been put out of action.’ He heard the news while he was in hospital in Leeds recovering from a gas attack and severe burns.

Hubert was born in 1898, the third son of Mr. Peter and Julie Johnson, of Lytherton Farm, Cadishead. He worked on the farm as a Farm Labourer.

He had lied about his age when he enlisted at Manchester on 10th March 1915, giving his age as 19 years 6 months. He was in fact only 16 years old. He was posted on the 11th March 1915 to 149th Royal Field Artillery, then on the 1st May 1915 he transferred to ‘B’ Battery 169th Brigade (County Palatine) Royal Field Artillery. His service between the 10th March 1915 to 10th January 1916 was all in the UK. He embarked at Devonport on the 11th January 1916 and disembarked at Port Said, Egypt, on the 25th January. He only served in Egypt for a short time as he was transferred to the Western Front, embarking from Alexandria on the 29th February and disembarking at Marseilles, France on the 9th March 1916. He was on leave in England from the 7th to 14th April 1916 and then returned to the Western Front.

He was posted to ‘C/14’ Battery, Royal Horse Artillery on 27th January 1917 and remained with the Battery when it became 400th Battery, Royal Field Artillery. He was appointed Lance Bombardier on the 14th April 1917. After another spell of leave in the UK, from the 9th to the 19th September 1917, he returned to France. He then served in Italy from the 29th November 1917 to 27th March 1918 and then France from 28th March 1918.

He was admitted to 4 Field Ambulance on 19th September 1918 having been gassed in action. Two days later he transferred to 32nd Stationary Hospital before returning to England on 30th September 1918. He was admitted to East Leeds War Hospital, Harehills Road, Leeds and then later moved to Catterick Military Hospital.

By 1919 he was serving with 416 Agricultural Labour Company, Labour Corps, at Lancaster. He transferred to Class Z, Army Reserve on 23rd April 1919 and was then discharged on demobilization on the 31st March 1920, having served 5 years 22 days. His Military Medal was gazetted on the 11th February 1919, which confirms that the medal was awarded whilst he was serving with 400th Battery, 14th Artillery Brigade. By 1921 he was living at 14 Spring Grove View, Burley Fields, Leeds, Yorkshire. He had two older brothers serving in the Army.

Frank Brooks
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Brooks of Liverpool Road, Cadishead received news that their son, Private Frank Brooks of the Manchester Regiment, had been awarded the Military Medal. He had enlisted three years earlier and was only 23 years old when he received the medal. Before the war Frank was employed at the CWS Soap Works. He attended at the Cadishead Wesleyan Sunday School and was listed on their Roll of Honour.

Arthur Potts
Corporal Arthur Potts (Service no. 251048) of the 6th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the 27th September 1918. His father, William Potts of 103 Liverpool Road, Cadishead, received news of the award in October. The letter included the medal ribbon which had been presented to him by the Commanding Officer of the Battalion. His medal was gazetted in the London Gazette 13th March 1919. Arthur was the only soldier remaining in France from his draft that went out to Gallipoli in 1915. Before the war Arthur was employed at the Wallpaper works of Messrs. Kinder and Co., Dean Road, Cadishead. He attended the Cadishead Primitive Methodist Mission and Sunday school, where he filled the position of secretary. He was well known and respected in the district. He returned to the wallpaper works after the war and worked there for many years. Arthur married Edith Wright on the 18th December 1918 at the Primitive Methodist Chapel, Glazebrook. He chose Clement Wright, the man he had saved on the battlefield, as his Best Man.

Stanley Stocks
Company Sergeant Major Stanley Stocks of the Kings Royal Rifles was awarded both the Distinguished Conduct Medal and the Military Medal. He ended the war in hospital in Netley suffering from the effects of mustard gas. He had enlisted in November 1914 and was among the first volunteers from the district. He had been wounded three times previously. At the time, he was 27 years old. Before the war Stanley lodged in Silver Street, Irlam, and was employed as a foreman by Mr. J. J. Upton, farmer and nurseryman. He married during the war. 

General
Before the opening ceremony, Mr. Cooper presented five medals for bravery won in the war. The first was the DCM to Councillor and ex-Sergeant (Acting Battery Quartermaster) Tom Cordingley of the Royal Garrison Artillery, which was awarded for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He had done good work with the battery during the enemy advance and, although wounded, got a rifle and ammunition and helped to check the advance until reinforcements arrived. Cordingley was loudly cheered as Mr. Cooper pinned the medal on his chest. Ex-Private Tom Povah of the 12th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, was given the welcome of a popular favourite by his colleagues, when he was presented with the Military Medal for carrying dispatches under shell-fire on August 4th, 1916. The Military Medal was also presented to Sergeant Samuel Wilkes of the 2nd Battalion of the Manchester Regiment, for devotion to duty whilst leading his platoon into action on October 1st 1918. Ex-Sergeant McArthur, of the 10th Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers was presented with the Military Medal for carrying wounded under shell-fire, although he was also wounded, on February 16th, 1918. The Battalion was at the time in the trenches at Graincourt. Ex-Private George Briggs, a former Lewis gunner, was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in carrying wounded under fire on October 4th, 1917.
Remembering

Pte Sidney Lee (36719), 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regt - dow 18.02.17
Sgt Charles Roberts (13668), 11th Bn, Manchester Regiment - kia 18.05.18
Bombardier John Hesford (70065), 147th Heavy Battery, RGA dow - 04.09.18
Pte Sidney Lee (4131324), 8th Bn, Cheshire Regiment -  kia 12.03.41

timberman

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2009, 09:48:26 AM »
Hi Pete

That is brilliant. When are you hoping to have the book published ???

Timberman

MMROLL

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2009, 02:38:31 PM »
Hi Pete, Many thanks for your help.The man you are looking for is 54953 SJT JAMES A LEEDER 10/BN R.W.FUS. Won the MM as a Cpl MM L/GAZ 16.8.17. He later served as 55513 YORK AND  LANCS REGT.MM Awarded for the Battle of ARRAS. Medal entitlement MM/BWM/VIC HOPE THIS IS HELPFUL, LET ME KNOW ANY OTHER MM PROBLEMS. Best wishes, Howard

MMROLL

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #13 on: December 21, 2009, 12:38:09 PM »
Dear Keith ,Your Grandfather was John Levi Kendall. He enlisted as 1360 in the Manchester Regt and landed in Gallipoli on 21.7.15.He was at some stage transferred to the MGC and served with 42nd Battalion /mgc with whom he won the MM London Gazette 13.3.19. this indicates MM won for  The Battle of Amiens most awards for this L/G date are for 8th August 1918. His MGC number was 39627 and at the time of his award his rank was Corporal.His MGC BN is noted in action on21/23 .8 18. and this may be the action for his award.(Battle of the ANCRE)Hope this is helpful. Best w. Howard

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #14 on: December 21, 2009, 12:47:30 PM »
051 Company Sergeant Major J. Ashworth, 24th Manchester Regiment
D.C.M. London Gazette 1.1.1919 14051 C./S./M. J. Ashworth, M.M., 24th (S) Bn. (P), Manch. R. (Oldham) (Italy).

''He has performed exceptionally valuable services as C.S.M. for over twenty months. Always courageous and energetic, he sets an excellent example to the N.C.O.s and men under him. During the offensive operations at Beaumont Hamel, 16th December-17th January; at Bullecourt, May-17th July; and east of Ypres, September-17th October, his coolness under the heaviest shell fire and his personal influence with his men were frequently and largely instrumental in the completion of urgent work. On several occasions during the period under consideration he was in charge of important wiring to No Man''s Land, south of Asiago, when his energy and determination contributed largely to the quality of the results achieved.''

M.M. London Gazette 9.12.1916 14051 Sjt. J. Ashworth, Manch. R.

14051 Company Sergeant Major James Ashworth, D.C.M., M.M., served with the 24th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers), Manchester Regiment in the French Theatre of War from 9.11.1915; his Battalion took part in the operations during the Somme offensive, including the attack on Mametz, 1.7.1916, where they were employed working in the communication trenches and strong points, and wired the whole of the front during the following night; later took part in 7th Division''s operations on the Bazentin Ridge, 14-17.7.1916; and the attack on High Wood, 20.7.1916; later worked on the roads in the Delville Wood area, and took part in the operations around Guillemont, 3-7.9.1916, before moving onto the Ypres sector. Awarded the D.C.M. for his gallantry during the Asiago offensive, serving with the 7th Division, which culminated with the Austrian retreat, 31.10.1918.

James ashworth, whilst commanding a platoon during the night of 1 – 2 September 1916, he was wounded in the leg and knocked down by a piece of shrapnel, but still carried on. He continued to supervise the work of his platoon until wounded a second time, when he had to be carried away. He returned to duty 16.09.16,

He was born 1890 and lived 36 Ogden st chadderton. He attended the 50th annual reunion when he was chairman of the old comrades association. He attended all the meeting except for one. 1950 – 1968, he was chairman from 1957, his address in 1964 was 35 parkway chadderton

this was passed on to me from davesmedals  from the British Medals Forum
« Last Edit: December 21, 2009, 12:50:30 PM by tonyrod »