The Manchester Regiment Forum

The Ladysmith => Military Medal Roll Project => Topic started by: MMROLL on December 19, 2009, 04:03:36 PM

Title: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on December 19, 2009, 04:03:36 PM
I have been working on this Roll since 1997.In 2003 Chris Bate,and myself were advised by William Spencer that the Original MM Cards were available to us as the MOD wished to dispose of them.We went to Hayes and collected approx 118,000 cards in 45 large boxes.Since then the card info has been transferred to disc and work is concluding on entering the info from the back of the cards onto the nominal roll.The Roll will contain the following details..NAME/RANK/NUMBER/BATTALION OR SUB UNIT/L/G DATE/CASUALTY DETAILS ,CWG,SOLDIERS DIED/IF COMMISSIONED DETAILS, DATE COMMISSIONED/NOTES IF ANY FROM BACK OF CARD/REG PAPER AND SCHEDULE NUMBERS/BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS IF AVAILABLE/and finally CITATIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS taken from literally hundreds of sources.Currently I have accumulated over 20,000 recommendations which are currently being laid on the Roll. I have all the AIF CITATIONS,and am on the trail of the CANADIANS about 8000 in all.Anyway this is where my appeal to you comes in.I need any citations/ info on awards plus photos of recipients and copies of MM documentation, DIV.gallantry cards etc.Already on the Roll are AIF/25th Div/29th div artillery/Notts and Derby/Tank CPS/1/ RWKENT./SOME LONDON REGTS/Men from Burnley/4th N fus/groups sold by DNW,SPINK ,SOTHEBY AND OTHERS SINCE 1980/ Plus thousands found in miscellaneous documents at the National Archives.The publication date is 2014 at the latest. ALL contributions will be acknowledged on the roll, currently over 100 collectors and researchers have and are contributing.I hope you feel able to help in some way. Particularly needed is someone to trawl Manchester Newspapers for details of awards and recipients,and their photos.Also if you have access to regimental or battalion histories mm award details however sparse are very helpful If you would like to see a sample sheet from the Roll I will email one to you remember tho there will be much more info to go on.If you feel you would like to help with this important project please contact me.EMAIL address is E mail address removed to stop spam     Please use the ICON under the name thank youThanks for reading this and I hope to hear from you,Best wishes, Howard Williamson (author of The Collector and Researchers Guide To The Great War)
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: kingo on December 19, 2009, 04:23:33 PM
Howard-these are the only 3 that i have found in my somewhat limited collection of documents. They are scans of scans-so the quality is not brilliant-but you are welcome to them if they are any use.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: kingo on December 19, 2009, 04:25:10 PM
No2
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: kingo on December 19, 2009, 04:25:59 PM
No 3
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on December 19, 2009, 08:29:42 PM
No2
Thanks "KINGO" APPRECIATED,Best wishes, Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Pete Th on December 20, 2009, 09:01:44 AM
The following are extracts from a book that I'm co-writing with Neil Drum called "A District At War - Irlam and Cadishead's Part in the Great War." We also have photos of many of these men. Please feel free to use any of this info in your book. In some cases I havent been able to trace the service number or, in one case J. A. Leader, the regiment. If you have any info that could help us trace them, it would be much appreciated:

Military Medallists from Irlam and Cadishead

ADAMS, Walter
Pte 19279. 2nd Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. 24th Brigade, 8th Division.

BRIGGS, George
Private. 6th (Service) Battalion, The Border Regiment. 33 Brigade, 11th (Northern) Division.

BROOKS, Ernest
Private, Lancashire Fusiliers

BROOKS, Frank
Private, The Manchester Regiment.

BROUGHTON, Peter
Private 21962. 17th (Service) Battalion (1st South East Lancashire), Lancashire Fusiliers. 104th Brigade, 35th Division.

COLLINS, William
Private. Service details unknown.

DALE, Roland
Corporal  3420. 13th Battalion, Kings Royal Rifle Corps.
111th Brigade, 37th Division.

DALE, Thomas
Bombardier 38252 Royal Garrison Artillery 17th Siege Battery (Irlam)

FLEMING, John
Private 12357 Loyal North Lancashire Regiment (Irlam)

GIBBON, George William
Sergeant 1131 (later number 250051), 1st/6th Battalion, Manchester Regiment. 127th Brigade, 42nd (East Lancashire) Division.

HOWARTH, Walter
The East Lancashire Regiment, attached Royal Engineers.

JOHNSON, Fred
Private, Artist’s Rifles

JOHNSON, Hubert.
Bombardier L/9896, 400th Battery, 14th Artillery Brigade, The Royal Field Artillery.


LEADER, J. A.
Corporal. Service details unknown.

LLOYD, George
Private, Royal Army Medical Corps.

MAYBURY, Thomas
Gunner 180975 Royal Garrison Artillery 230th Siege Battery (Irlam)

McARTHUR, David
Sergeant  6575. 10th (Service) Battalion, The Lancashire Fusiliers, 52nd Brigade , 17th (Northern) Division.

MELLOR, Wilfred
Sergeant 108377. 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles.

POTTS, Arthur
Corporal 3534 (Later number 251048). 1st/6th (T.F) Battalion, The Manchester Regiment.  127th Brigade, 42nd (East Lancashire) Division.

POVAH, Thomas
Private 13712. 12th Battalion, The Manchester Regiment. 52nd Brigade, 17th (Northern) Division.

ROYLE, George
Sergeant 19726. 18th (Service) Battalion (2nd South East Lancashire), The Lancashire Fusiliers. 104th Brigade, 35th Division.

SMITH, John
Private. 2nd Battalion, The Sherwood Forester’s (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). 71st Brigade, 6th Division.

STOCKS, Stanley
Company Sergeant Major. King’s Royal Rifle Corps.

TAYLOR, Frederick W.
Sergeant. Royal Garrison Artillery.

UNSWORTH, Fred
Sergeant 19285. 21st Battalion, The Manchester Regiment.  91st Brigade, 7th Division. Awarded the Military Medal and Bar.

WILKES, Samuel
Sergeant 34509. 2nd Battalion, The Manchester Regiment.

YATES, Joseph
Private. The Manchester Regiment.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Pete Th on December 20, 2009, 09:03:13 AM
Walter Howarth

Private Walter Howarth of the East Lancashire Regiment was awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct on the Western Front. He had been recommended for the medal by a subaltern (and Bombing officer) of the Essex Regiment in recognition of services rendered by Walter in the relief of comrades who had been buried by the explosion of a German mine. The rescue involved great danger as most of the trench breastwork had been blown in and the German trench was only 40 yards away. His regiment had been decimated in one of the early engagements on the Somme and Walter was transferred to a Tunnelling Company of the Royal Engineers. The operations he undertook were considerably dangerous as most of the breastwork of the trench had been destroyed and the enemy trench was only 40 yards away.  On the 12th July 1916, Walter wrote:

‘I now take the pleasure of answering your welcome letter and newspaper. I have seen George Mahoney’s photograph in the paper. I consider and think myself a very lucky lad, after what I went through on Sunday night. At 8.25 the Germans blew a mine up; it was one of the biggest explosions that I have been in or seen for some time. We lost eight men through it. I got a shock, but nothing more. At the time I was working in the next mine, and as luck would happen I just came to the top as the candles would not burn. I had only been at the top a few minutes when they blew it up. The bombardment was something awful. Here I came out lucky again. I was hit three times with pieces of shrapnel, but they never fetched blood. It was a good job that one large piece hit me on the thigh with smooth side of shrapnel otherwise it would have taken my leg off. Well, I don’t think that I will ever get killed after that, but I will never forget last Sunday night. I would have written to you sooner, but I did not feel well after the shock. I am now in the best of health. I enclose a piece of ribbon of the Military Medal that I am wearing.’

Walter had had the misfortune of losing both parents at an early age, was brought up by Mrs Haughton of Well Farm, Fiddlers Lane, Irlam. He worked for the CWS for eight years before enlisting in September 1914.

Mr J. E. Green, general manager of the CWS Soap Works made a presentation of a wrist watch and a body shield to Walter Howarth in February 1917. The presentation commemorated the Military Medal that Walter had won during 1916. The body shield was engraved with ‘European War 1914. Presented to Private W. Howarth on the occasion of him winning the Military Medal, by the CWS Irlam staff and employees with congratulations.’ Before the war Walter was employed in the starch department of the works. After the presentation, Walter was given a hearty send-off by his former workmates and the residents of Irlam on his way to the station on his return to France.

Wilfred Mellor
Company Sergeant Major Wilfred Mellor (Service no. 108377) served with the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles (CMR), 8th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division, Canadian Corps, Canadian Expeditionary Force.

Wilfred was born in Saddleworth, Yorkshire on the 9th July 1883, the son of Ben and Hannah Mellor who later resided at 1 Alexandra Grove, Irlam. He grew up in Delph, Yorkshire and served in the Army during the South African war, where he was wounded in the foot. He was married to Cissie (from Milnrow, Rochdale) and they had one child. He was well known in the Irlam and Cadishead district where he resided in the early 1900’s and founded the local Boy Scout movement.

In about 1909, he left England with his brother Herbert and their families for a new life in Canada, where Wilfred joined the Canadian Police in Lethbridge, Alberta. Herbert eventually sent his wife and son home and then followed them back to live in Alexandra Grove, Irlam. Wilfred’s wife and family moved back to Irlam at some point before the war. Two addresses are given for the family; 47 Baines Avenue, Irlam and 1 Alexandra Grove, Irlam.

Wilfred enlisted into the Canadian Expeditionary Force on the 31st December 1914 at Medicine Hat, Alberta. He was 31 ½ years of age, 5 foot 10 ½ inches tall, with brown hair, brown eyes and a fair complexion. He was posted to the 3rd Canadian Mounted Rifles (CMR). On the 14th January 1915 he was promoted Lance Corporal. The 3rd CMR sailed for England on the 12th June 1915 with a strength of 28 officers and 598 other ranks. Between the 16th and 18th August Wilfred went absent without leave whilst the unit was stationed at Shorncliffe camp, he received a punishment of 3 days pay forfeited.

On the 22nd September, the 3rd CMR arrived in France and the next day Wilfred was promoted in the field to Sergeant. On the 2nd January 1916, he transferred to the 2nd CMR, and joined the unit the next day. Between the 10th and 18th February 1916 he managed to get back to Irlam on leave, and then rejoined his unit on the 21st February.

On the 26th May 1916 he won the Military Medal, the first soldier from the district to gain this distinction. He wrote to his mother stating he would explain how it was won when he got home; sadly that was not to be. The unit war diary for the day he was recommended for the medal records that at 4pm the enemy shelled Poperinghe causing a number of casualties. It is likely that he was awarded the medal for a gallant act during this incident. He had also been mentioned in dispatches three times. When his Captain, Captain Coates, was ‘mortally wounded’, Wilfred carried him from the field (the Commonwealth War Graves Commission does not record a Captain Coates, 2nd CMR as a casualty).

Between the 3rd and 4th June 1916, the 2nd CMR were in action in the area of Maple Copse, Belgium and they suffered heavy casualties during intense and concentrated enemy shelling and rifle fire. Wilfred was ‘shell-shocked’ and admitted to No. 10 Casualty Clearing Station, and then to No. 25 General Hospital at Hardelot. On the 23rd June 1916, he was sent to No. 1 Convalescent Depot, Boulogne, and on the 26th June declared fit for duty and sent to the Base Depot. On the 10th August, the award of his Military Medal was announced in the London Gazette.  Two days later he was posted to the 3rd Entrenching Battalion and joined this unit on the 14th August. He remained with them until the 22nd September when he was posted to and rejoined the 2nd CMR.

On the 24th September, the 2nd CMR were resting at Bouzincourt, on the Somme. Later that day they moved to Courcellette. On this day Wilfred was promoted to Acting Company Sergeant Major (paid). On the 26th the Battalion moved to Albert and the next day they took over part of the enemy Zollern and Hessian trench system that had already been captured.

Wilfred was killed in action on 30th September 1916, aged 34, during heavy fighting in the area of Hessian trench, near Courcellette. He is commemorated on the Vimy Memorial.  On the 5th October 1916, his mother received his Military Medal which had been sent by the Canadian records office. He was awarded the Military Medal and ‘15 star trio.’ His father died on 4th February 1907, aged 47 and his mother on 16th February 1951, aged 89.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Pete Th on December 20, 2009, 09:04:33 AM
Fred Unsworth

Sergeant Fred Unsworth (19285) of the 21st Manchester’s (91st Brigade, 7th Division) was awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct. The following is an extract from the Brigade Orders dated 8th February 1917:

‘The Corps Commander has been pleased to award the Military Medal to the undermentioned N.C.O. 19285 Sergt. F. Unsworth of the Manchesters. The Divisional Brigade Commanders wish their congratulations conveyed to the recipient.’

Fred received the medal for releasing a number of horses while under heavy German shell-fire. At the time, there were no commissioned officers near, and being the most senior NCO, he acted on his own initiative. He modestly stated in a letter to his wife that he does not wish to have all the credit, as every man was perfectly willing and ready to assist in releasing the horses, with the result that not one was hurt.

Sergeant Fred Unsworth, of the 21st (Service) Battalion (6th City) of the Manchester Regiment and Roland Dale, The Kings Royal Rifles Corps, had been awarded Military Medals for gallant conduct earlier in the year. At a special function held by the Irlam Urban District Council in October to celebrate the awards, Joseph Cooke stated that Sergeant Fred Unsworth had been in severe engagements in the Somme and Ancre. The 91st Infantry Brigade was stationed at a village when the Germans started a heavy bombardment with long range guns. A large number of horses were removed and some 64 left behind. On 12th December 1916, during a heavy bombardment, he released a number of horses which were held up in a stable. As soon as the horses made good their escape, the stable was completed destroyed by German shells. In January 1917, Colonel W. W. Norman presented Fred with the ribbon, at a ceremony witnessed by the Brigadier General. He was the first solder from Cadishead to gain the Military Medal.

Sergeant Fred Unsworth enlisted with the Transport section of the 6th Battalion of the Manchester Regiment on the 14th November 1914. His parents lived in Hayes Road, Cadishead and he married Miss Annie Hickson, daughter of Fred Hickson of Liverpool Road on 18th September 1915. Her brother, also Fred Hickson, served in the army and was killed in action in November 1916. Fred and Annie set up home together at 59 Fir Street, Cadishead. Fred worked in the crude glycerine department of the CWS and was highly respected in Cadishead. Fred and his wife were well known in the area because of their religious activities. Annie was a Sunday school teacher and a member of the choir of Irlam Wesleyan Church and Fred was a teacher in the Cadishead Wesleyan Sunday school and a local preacher. By 1916 he was serving with the 21st Manchester’s. His brother Frank served with the Royal Garrison Artillery and was killed in action earlier in 1917.

In December 1918 news was received that Sergeant Fred Unsworth of the 21st Battalion of the Manchester Regiment had been awarded the bar to the Military Medal that he had won at Beaumont Hamel in 1917. He gained the bar for carrying ammunition under heavy artillery fire and a mustard gas attack at Asiago in Italy.


George Royle
Sergeant George Royle (19726) of the 18th (Service) Battalion (2nd South East Lancashire) Lancashire Fusiliers, received a gunshot wound to the chest and shoulder on the 15th April. The next day he was admitted to 106 Field Ambulance and to 21 Casualty Clearing Station the same day. On the 21st April he was in hospital at Rouen. George was born in Manchester in 1890. In 1915 he was living with his father, also called George, at 12 Dixon Street, Irlam and worked as a labourer. He enlisted, aged 25 years 4 months, at Salford on 24th May 1915, for the 'Duration of the War'. He was immediately posted to 20th (Service) Battalion (4th Salford), The Lancashire Fusiliers. He transferred to the 22nd Battalion on 4th September 1915, and in the same month he was appointed Lance Corporal (paid) from 2nd October. On the 27th November 1915 he left Whitchurch and travelled to Salisbury where he was posted to 18th (Service) Battalion, 2nd South East Lancashires. This battalion was serving with 104th Brigade, 35th Division. George married his wife, Gladys, at Holcombe Parish Church, Lancashire on 24th December 1915. He embarked at Southampton 29th January 1916 for France, disembarking at Le Havre. On the 17th April 1916 he was promoted to Corporal, then appointed paid Lance Sergeant on the 11th October and promoted to Sergeant on the 2nd March 1917. After recovering from his wounds he rejoined his battalion on the 27th June 1917. Between the 19th February and 5th March 1918 he was in England on leave. He returned to the Western Front on 6th March and remained there until the 16th August. It appears that he was also wounded in June 1918. He had further leave in England between the 17th to 31st August. He transferred to Class Z, Army Reserve on 14th February 1919 and settled at 3 Old Green, Greenmount, Tottington, Bury. George was awarded the Military Medal for his actions at Aveluy Wood and he was also awarded the Belgian Croix de Guerre. On the 7th July 1922 he acknowledged receipt of the 'Pair' and on 25th August 1922 he acknowledged receipt of the 'Diploma Belgian Croix de Guerre'.

John Smith
Private John ‘Jack’ Smith of the Sherwood Foresters was awarded the Military Medal for good work in rallying a working party under heavy shelling on the night of 15th May 1917. While recovering from wounds in hospital in Sunderland, he was presented with the medal by the King who asked him how his wound was getting on and shook hands with him. In a letter to friends in Cadishead he wrote ‘I felt as proud as a peacock when a storm is coming on. I expect to come home shortly on leave and will bring the medal with me.’ John lodged with Mr S. McKay of Whitfield Street, Cadishead and was employed by Mr Motley, coal dealer of Mersey View on Hayes Road, Cadishead.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Pete Th on December 20, 2009, 09:05:17 AM
Walter Adams
During the month, Private Walter Adams (Service no. 19279) of the 2nd Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment, 24th Brigade, 8th Division, received a parchment certificate for gallant conduct and devotion to duty in action during operations east of Ypres on 31st July 1917.

Walter was born in Cadishead in 1874, the son of Benjamin and Caroline Adams. By 1914 Walter was living at 17, Whitfield Street, Cadishead, with his wife, Mary Jane, and their children, William (born 1898), Louie (1900), George (1901), Maggie (c.1904), Harriett (c.1907) Edith (c.1910) and Walter (1914).

He worked for the Manchester Ship Canal Company as a Coal Trimmer at the Partington Coal Basin. Incredibly, although he was forty years old and married with seven children, he volunteered for the Army. He enlisted into the East Lancashire Regiment on the 8th March 1915 becoming Private 19279 Walter Adams.

He first arrived on the Western Front on the 4th August 1915 and joined the 2nd Battalion on the 18th August 1915. The 2nd Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment was part of the 24th Brigade, 8th Division.

Walter served throughout the Battle of the Somme 1916 and in the actions during the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line 1917. By June that year the battalion moved into Belgium and commenced preparation for their part in the forthcoming great offensive, the 3rd Battle of Ypres (sometimes referred to as ‘Third Ypres’ or simply ‘Passchendaele’).

The Regimental history of the East Lancashire Regiment in the Great War states the following for the actions on the 31st July:

‘The Plan for the attack so far as it concerned the 8th Division was as follows:-

The 8th Division on a front of about 1,800 yards with its left on the Ypres-Roulers railway, was the left division of II Corps; the 30th Division was on its right and the 15th Division on its left.

Four separate objectives were given for the first day’s attack, these were: The Blue line immediately east of Bellewaarde lake; the Black line along the crest of Wethoek ridge; the Green line some 1,500 yards east of the Black line; and the Red line still further east of the Broodseinde ridge. The 24th Brigade was only concerned with the Blue and Black lines; the first of these lines consisted of four more or less irregular lines of trenches; the second consisted of only two lines of trenches.

The 23rd and 24th Brigades were detailed to capture both the Blue and the Black lines, and the 25th for the attack on the Green line. On the 24th Brigade front, the right brigade of the Division, the 1st Worcestershire and 2nd Northants were detailed to attack on the Blue line; the 2nd East Lancashire and 1st Sherwood Foresters were detailed to pass through the Blue line when captured, and attack the Black line.

The 2nd East Lancashire, the right battalion of its line, was disposed as follows in three waves:-

First wave: Two platoons of each of ‘D’ and ‘C’ Companies – objective the first trench of the Black line.

Second wave: The two remaining platoons of ‘D’ and ‘C’ Companies to pass through the first trench when captured, to attack the second trench, and consolidate it when captured.

Third wave: Two platoons of ‘A’ Company to pass through both captured trenches and establish an outpost line some 150 yards beyond the captured system. Two Stokes mortars accompanied the first wave, and the officer commanding ‘D’ Company received special instructions with regard to the action to be taken in the event of failure of troops on his right. Two platoons of ‘B’ Company were attached to each of ‘D’ and ‘C’ Company as “moppers-up” and the remaining two platoons of ‘A’ Company were detailed as ‘carriers.’

The attack of the 8th Division was supported by seven brigades of Field Artillery which, reckoning 18-pdrs only, in the barrage gave about one gun to every 14 yards of front; the rate of the movement of the barrage was 100 yards in four minutes. Zero hour for the attack was 3.50 a.m., and troops detailed for the attack on the Black line were ordered to advance from their assembly trenches at such time as would enable them to be close to the protective barrage beyond the Blue line at Zero plus one hour and fifteen minutes.

The Battalion left its billets in Ypres at 9 p.m. on July 30th, and by 1 a.m. on the 31st was in its assembly trenches, the first wave in ‘Wing’ trench, and the second and third waves in ‘Zouave’ trench. Twenty minutes after Zero the battalion advanced in ‘artillery formation’ to the Bellewaarde ridge, and passing through the captured Blue line was formed up ready to attack by 5 a.m. The advance commenced up to time, and the whole of the objective on the battalion front was captured in spite of considerable opposition, especially on the right flank where the left battalion of the 30th Division had been unable to get on.

The enemy made a determined on this flank, but was driven off with heavy loss, a result which was largely due to the courage and initiative of Corporal Hyndman*, who, seeing the attack coming, took his Lewis-gun section well out on the exposed flank and dealt successfully with the enemy. Two further counter attacks were driven off during the day with heavy loss to the enemy; in these attacks Stokes mortars and rifle grenades did great execution. The position was maintained for the rest of that day and the whole of the next under heavy artillery fire and considerable enfilade fire from machine guns and rifles from the right, until the battalion was relieved on the night of August 1st/2nd, and went back to a camp near Ypres. Although the attack on the Green line had not been successful, the action, so far as the battalion was concerned, was satisfactory.... All ranks worked splendidly and were absolutely untiring.’

[*The authors found an article relating to Hyndman’s award of the DCM, Salford City Reporter 8th September 1917, Corporal 14161 Ernest Hyndman lived in Lower Broughton. By 1917 he was 19 and already a veteran of Gallipoli and the Somme.]

So read the 2nd battalion’s war diary following their action in the Battle of Pilkem during the opening of the Third Battle of Ypres, 31st July 1917. Walter was one of the ‘other ranks’ who took part in the attack and received a parchment certificate ‘for gallant conduct and devotion to duty in action during operations east of Ypres’, it read:

‘On arrival at the Black Line, he went forward into a shell hole and shot several hostile snipers who were doing considerable damage to our men. He then found a Lewis gun which was out of action, and putting it in working order made good use of it throughout the day. He dispersed a party of machine gunners who were causing us many casualties, and also carried messages under fire. Signed by the Major General of the Division.’

Walter was appointed a Lance Corporal (Paid) on 31st October 1917. It is believed he was awarded his Military Medal for ‘gallant conduct’ on the 20th November 1917. The circumstances that led to this award is not known, however it is known that the 2nd East Lancashire’s were undertaking a three day stint holding the front line immediately North West of Passchendaele village, during which time they were under gas and artillery bombardment frequently.

On New Year’s Eve 1917 Walter was admitted to a Field Ambulance suffering with ‘trench feet’ and the next day, 1st January 1918, he was admitted to 44 Casualty Clearing Station. He was posted to England on board the ‘St. Patrick’ on the 4th January 1918, the next day he was reverted to Private and was posted on the strength of the East Lancashire’s Regimental Depot. On the same day the Warrington Guardian reported:

“ANOTHER MILITARY MEDALLIST – The wife of Lance Corporal Walter Adams, of the East Lancashires, who lives in Whitfield-street, Cadishead, has received from her husband a letter of congratulations from the Lieutenant-General commanding the division upon the honour conferred upon him by his Majesty the King in awarding him the Military Medal for gallant conduct on the 20th November. No further details have been received. Prior to the war Lance-Corporal Adams was employed by the Manchester Ship Canal Co., as a coal trimmer. It is the second honour he has achieved for a few months ago he was awarded a parchment certificate for ‘gallant conduct and devotion to duty.’ The certificate set forth that during operations on July 31st Lance-Corporal Adams entered a shellhole and shot several hostile snipers who were doing considerable damage. He afterwards found a Lewis Gun, which he turned to good account during the day. He dispersed a party of machine-gunners who were causing considerable casualties, and he also carried messages under fire. Lance-Corporal Adams has a large family, and is well known in the Cadishead district. He is the ninth local soldier to have gained the Military Medal.”

On the 23rd February 1918 the award of his MM was announced in the supplement to London Gazette. On the 11th March 1918 he was posted to Western Command Depot, Knowsley Park. On the 18th July he was posted to the Reserve Unit, joining the 3rd Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment at Saltburn on 28th July 1918.

At his medical board he was recorded as suffering permanent myalgia (he had this problem since 1916) and trench feet (since February, 1918) and discharged 2nd October 1918 to Class P, Army Reserve for employment with the Manchester Ship Canal Company. He was discharged ‘being no longer physically fit for war service’ on 3rd February 1919. He had served 3 years 208 days with the Colours and 125 days in Reserve. Walter returned to his family, and his job as a Coal Trimmer.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Pete Th on December 20, 2009, 09:07:15 AM
Roland Dale

According to a newspaper report the first real engagement that Lance Corporal Roland Dale of the King’s Royal Rifles Corps took part in was the fighting at  Pozieres, and later at High Wood, on the Somme. He also fought at  Beaucourt, near the Ancre, where his Battalion (considerably weakened to 400 men) were the first over the top and captured 800 prisoners. Later during the Battle of Arras (April 1917), Roland’s Battalion was detailed to take about two miles of ground, including the village of Monchy Le Preux. A snowstorm was raging at the time, and the Battalion lost all its officers in the early stages of the attack. Roland took a platoon over the top and cleared the village. He personally killed eight and wounded seven of the enemy, and did good work in clearing the cellars. Roland enlisted on 1st September 1914. He was a friend of Harry Hingston and Joseph Morgan. Before the war Roland resided with his father, Edward Norris Dale, at 43 Lord Street, Cadishead and was employed at the CWS Soap Works.  Four of Roland’s brothers also served, Gunner Robert John Dale, Royal Field Artillery, Sergeant Norris Dale Manchester Regiment, Private James Edward Dale, Manchester Regiment and Private Arthur Dale who in 1917 was in a Training Reserve Battalion.

Sergeant Unsworth and Lance Corporal Dale’s wives each received a beautifully illuminated address from Mr. Brew in a neat English gilt frame. Mr. Brew said the distinctions gained reflected credit and honour on the whole district. A motion was agreed that other local soldiers’ gallantry awards would be similarly recognised. Mr. J. T. Royle (ex-chairman of the council) said the two Cadishead soldiers had been home on leave but the brief furlough did not give time for the presentations to be made. The Reverends R. Martin and W. Hudson, and Councillors Turner, Longden, Hampson, Wadsworth and Mr. Cuthbert delivered brief addresses of congratulation, alluding to the glorious traits of the British soldiers. Mr. George Thomas, J.P. handed copies of the local ‘Souvenir and Official Record’ to the recipients and said the district was proud of the loyalty, devotion to duty and patriotism which had been displayed by all the men who had left their homes to uphold the cause of freedom and righteousness.

Thomas Povah
On the 6th October 1916, news was officially received that Private Thomas Povah of 49 Dixon Street, Irlam had been awarded the Military Medal. He served with the Manchester Regiment. ‘I am in the pink and glad to tell you I have been awarded the Military Medal. Don’t worry about me as I am all right. I don’t think it will be long before I see you all again with a bit of luck.’

Another special meeting of the District Council was held during October to congratulate Private Thomas Povah (service no. 13712) of the 12th Battalion, Manchester Regiment on being awarded the Military Medal during the battle of the Somme in the previous year.

A large gathering including Councillors J. A. Brew JP (Chairman – elected April 1917), A. H. Turner (vice Chairman), J. T. Royle, J. J. Paterson, George Whitfield, F. G. Melville, R. Hampson, the Reverend Dr. Martin (Vicar of Irlam), the Reverend W. Hudson (Wesleyan Minister), Mr. George Thomas JP (President of the Red Cross), Mr. J. Drum and Mr. and Mrs Povah (parents) and other members of the family and friends. Mr. Joseph Cooke (Clerk) stated that Private Povah enlisted on the 6th November 1914 and went out to France on July 27th of the following year. He took part in several engagements on the Belgium front and gained the distinction on the 4th August in the memorable battle at ‘Devil’s’ Wood. He volunteered, along with a comrade from the West Riding Regiment, to carry a message from Brigade headquarters to the commanding officer under heavy shell-fire and returned unscarred though heavy shelling was taking place all the time. Both were recommended for the Military Medal. Povah was wounded by a stray shell after he had delivered the message and spent six weeks in hospital. Since returning to the front, he had taken part in several engagements on the Somme and Arras fronts. He had previously been wounded in February 1916 at the ‘Bluff’ near Hill 60 and subsequently spent two months in hospital.

A resolution of congratulation was unanimously passed and Private Thomas Povah, accompanied by his parents, was handed a beautifully illuminated address in an English gilt frame. The Chairman said the district was very proud of all their local soldiers and delighted to know that several of them had gained distinguished honours on the field. Several other congratulatory addresses were delivered, and Mr. George Thomas, J.P., on behalf of the Red Cross Committee, handed Thomas a morocco-bound copy of the ‘Souvenir and Roll of Honour.’ The Chairman said that it was a great honour to have the privilege of actually pinning the Military Medal on the breast of a local soldier (Fred Unsworth and Roland Dale had been on active service and therefore unable to attend the similar presentation mentioned above).

The Chairman went on to day that the district was proud of all such men, indeed they were glad to know that the district had responded so nobly to the call to arms in defence of the most sacred and righteous cause possible. The toll of the war was heavy – Irlam and Cadishead had suffered greatly in soldiers being killed – but the cause was a noble one and he was sure they were all agreed the war must be fought to a conclusion which would prevent a repetition of such horrors for all time. They were honoured by the presence of Private Povah and the distinction he had won. He hoped his life would be spared and that the district would soon have him and many other soldiers back in their midst again.

The medal, which was pinned on Private Povah’s left breast amid much applause, was of Silver and contained the words ‘For Gallantry in the Field’ on one side and an excellent representation of the King. The rim contained the name of the soldier and his regiment.

 Mr J. Drum stated that he had known Thomas Povah for many years and had always found him to be a most estimable young man. He would never forget the time he joined up. He said at the time that he would strive to do his duty, and he had done so, nobly. He repeated the hope expressed by the Chairman that Thomas’ life would be spared and hoped further distinctions awaited him.

The Reverend Dr. Martin said they were proud of all the young men who had joined up, and sympathised with greatly with the widows and parents who had lost those near and dear to him. He agreed with the Chairman that the cause of the Allies was a noble and righteous one. The evening would be long remembered by Private Povah and his parents. Reverend Hudson rejoiced to think that the district had done so well and regretted greatly the losses which had been sustained. He believed that it would, however, be a consolation to the bereaved to know that their dear ones had fallen in a righteous cause.

Councillors Royle, Turner, Hampson and Paterson added their appreciation of Private Povah’s devotion to duty. Mr. George Thomas JP said thanks were due to the military for allowing the opportunity of honouring a local soldier and he hoped to see a permanent memorial erected in the district sooner or later. He thought the war might be over earlier than many people thought and he hoped the proposed memorial scheme would be heartily taken on. He himself would subscribe £10 and it was hoped a substantial sum would be raised by the sale of the Souvenir and Roll of Honour. Private Povah acknowledged the kind remarks which had been spoken and said he would continue to do his duty when he returned to the front. He was hopeful of winning the Victoria Cross.

Private Thomas Povah lived at 49 Dixon Street, Irlam. He was described as a sturdy football player. Before he enlisted he was employed at the new rope works of Messrs. Millington and Sheldrick of Irlam. He had first arrived in France on the 28th July 1915. As well as the Military Medal, he was also awarded the ‘15 Star Trio.’
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Pete Th on December 20, 2009, 09:09:17 AM
George Briggs
Private George Briggs (Service no. 17663) of the Border Regiment was awarded the Military Medal in November. The news of the medal award was conveyed in a letter George sent to his mother at 11 Preston Avenue, Irlam, although he did not give any details of how he came to gain the distinction. He explained to his mother that he was in the best of health and had just received a letter from his brother, Harry, who was in a different part of the line.
 
Most of the letter was crossed out by the censor who showed some compassion by stating that he ‘… was delighted that Private Briggs had just been awarded the Military Medal for Gallantry.’ The following is an extract from the letter:

‘I am a long way from him now, and it may be months before I go up that part again. I hope the next time we meet him will be in England. I didn’t think that November morning three years ago this war would last so long, and I didn’t think I should be able to stick it for over two years out here. But I am still going on, and as fit as ever I was, so don’t trouble yourself about me, as I never say die. Cheer up and may the war soon be over, and all of us back home again.’

Before the war George worked in the Starch department of the CWS Soap Works.  He was the eighth employee of the works to be awarded the Military Medal. George had enlisted with the Lancashire Fusiliers on the 14th November 1914 and disembarked at France on the 14th July 1915. He later transferred to the Border Regiment. In 1917, George was granted special leave from the Army to marry his sweetheart who lived in Chapel Road, Irlam. At the end of the war he was transferred to Class Z, Army Reserve and, in addition to the Military Medal, he awarded the '15 Star trio.' After the war he lived with his wife at 1 Marlborough Avenue, Irlam.

Fred Taylor
News was received that Sergeant Frederick W. Taylor of the Royal Garrison Artillery had been awarded the Military Medal which he had received for gallantry near Hill 60. He was in charge of a party who effected communication by way of running a telephone line to the guns under heavy fire from the enemy. This was prior to the infantry going ‘over the top’ on the 7th June 1917. On 20th September 1917 his officer had said that he was further going to recommend him for a bar to his medal for similar gallantry, sadly the officer was killed shortly after. Fred was home on leave in December 1917 and, at lunchtime on the 21st December, he visited the dining room at the CWS Soap Works where the General Manager, Mr. J. E. Green, presented him with a body shield and silver wrist watch as a token of appreciation of the honour he had gained. The dining room had been decorated for the occasion and many of the staff were present and gave Fred a hearty welcome. The same evening he  attended a ceremony at the Irlam District Council offices. Mr. J.A. Brew, J.P (Chairman of the council) pinned the Military Medal to Fred’s chest, and wished him ‘God’s speed.’ Mr. George Thomas JP, president of the local Red Cross, presented him with a morocco bound copy of the local souvenir and Roll of Honour.

George William Gibbon
Sergeant George William Gibbon (Service no. 250051) of the Manchester Regiment was awarded the Military Medal. The citation for his medal read as follows:

‘For continuous great devotion to duty at all times under the most trying conditions from March 24th 1918 until 7th April 1918. This NCO was personally responsible for getting rations, water and supplies up to the Battalion and on many occasions the enemy shelling was very intense. By his coolness and utter disregard for personal safety he inspired the men under his charge. The above period was while the Battalion was in action in the vicinity of Buquoy.’

In a letter to his wife, George stated: ‘We stood for two hours in one place but it was worth it all. We got the General’s salute, and then a march past. I can tell you it was a sight worth seeing. It was read out what we received our medals for and I am going to send it on to you. I got it for doing my duty.’

George was a long serving Territorial before the war, having enlisted on the 16th July 1909. As a result he was one of the first from the district to be called up. He rejoined the 1st/6th Manchesters at Heaton Park on the 5th August 1914. He was a member of the Transport Section of the Battalion and saw active service in Egypt (twice) and Gallipoli. He also spent some time in Malta. He went to France in March 1917.

By 1918 he had not been home for 3 years. In addition to the Military Medal, George was awarded the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal and the ’15 Star Trio’. The Territorial Efficiency Medal was awarded for long service in the Territorial Forces. The criteria were for a minimum of 12 years service with war service counting double. George received one red chevron and four blue chevrons, which were awarded for each year of overseas service, with the red chevron signifying that he served overseas before 31st December 1914. He also had a ‘wound stripe’ showing that at some point in his service he had been wounded. He later served with ‘B’ Company of the 12th Manchester’s (52nd Brigade, 17th Division).

George was born in 1890. His father was a well known Irlam farmer and before the war, George worked on his father’s farm, Moorfield Farm, and he lived with his wife at 300 Liverpool Road, Irlam. His name was on the Irlam Wesleyan Roll of Honour.

Peter Broughton
Private Peter Broughton (service no. 21962) of the 20th (4th Salford) (Service) Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers was awarded the Military Medal for bravery during the battle of Courtrai in October 1918. Peter was on bombing duty on 4th October 1918, at a small village to the left of Menin (near Ypres, Belgium). His bombing of a number of cellars in which some Germans were hiding resulted in thirteen coming out with their hands up.

Peter was born in Norton, Cheshire (c.1896) and educated at Daresbury School. He was employed as a crane driver at the Steelworks and resided, with his mother, Frances, at 24 Dixon Street, Irlam. He enlisted at Eccles on 17th July 1915 at the age of 19 years 37 days. On the 7th August 1915 he was posted from Pendleton to Conway, where he was stationed until 1st September. He was then posted to Salisbury where he remained until being posted to France on the 29th January 1916. 

On the 6th February 1918 Peter was posted to ‘Y’ Company, 17th (Service) (1st South East Lancashire) Battalion, Lancashire Fusiliers (104th Brigade, 35th Division). His specialist military trade was a bomber. He had leave in England between the 3rd and 18th February 1918 and then returned to France and served on the Western Front. On the 14th October 1918 he received a gunshot wound to his left leg. Three days later he returned to the UK and was admitted to the Bradford War Hospital where he remained a patient until 30th January 1919 when he transferred to the Dispersal Hospital at Dewsbury. He transferred to Class Z, Army Reserve on the 4th March 1919. His Military Medal was reported in the London Gazette on the 17th June 1919 and he acknowledged receipt of the medal on the 31st December 1919. Military Medal and ‘Pair.’

Peter’s father, Henry, was an ex-soldier who had fought in the Burma war with the Cheshire Regiment (both Battalions of the regiment served in Burma between 1887 to 1891). Henry served in the Royal Engineers during the First World War.

Hubert Johnson
News was received that Bombardier Hubert Johnson (L/9896) of the Royal Field Artillery 400th Battery, 14th Artillery Brigade had been awarded the Military Medal for ‘sticking to his gun after all his pals had been put out of action.’ He heard the news while he was in hospital in Leeds recovering from a gas attack and severe burns.

Hubert was born in 1898, the third son of Mr. Peter and Julie Johnson, of Lytherton Farm, Cadishead. He worked on the farm as a Farm Labourer.

He had lied about his age when he enlisted at Manchester on 10th March 1915, giving his age as 19 years 6 months. He was in fact only 16 years old. He was posted on the 11th March 1915 to 149th Royal Field Artillery, then on the 1st May 1915 he transferred to ‘B’ Battery 169th Brigade (County Palatine) Royal Field Artillery. His service between the 10th March 1915 to 10th January 1916 was all in the UK. He embarked at Devonport on the 11th January 1916 and disembarked at Port Said, Egypt, on the 25th January. He only served in Egypt for a short time as he was transferred to the Western Front, embarking from Alexandria on the 29th February and disembarking at Marseilles, France on the 9th March 1916. He was on leave in England from the 7th to 14th April 1916 and then returned to the Western Front.

He was posted to ‘C/14’ Battery, Royal Horse Artillery on 27th January 1917 and remained with the Battery when it became 400th Battery, Royal Field Artillery. He was appointed Lance Bombardier on the 14th April 1917. After another spell of leave in the UK, from the 9th to the 19th September 1917, he returned to France. He then served in Italy from the 29th November 1917 to 27th March 1918 and then France from 28th March 1918.

He was admitted to 4 Field Ambulance on 19th September 1918 having been gassed in action. Two days later he transferred to 32nd Stationary Hospital before returning to England on 30th September 1918. He was admitted to East Leeds War Hospital, Harehills Road, Leeds and then later moved to Catterick Military Hospital.

By 1919 he was serving with 416 Agricultural Labour Company, Labour Corps, at Lancaster. He transferred to Class Z, Army Reserve on 23rd April 1919 and was then discharged on demobilization on the 31st March 1920, having served 5 years 22 days. His Military Medal was gazetted on the 11th February 1919, which confirms that the medal was awarded whilst he was serving with 400th Battery, 14th Artillery Brigade. By 1921 he was living at 14 Spring Grove View, Burley Fields, Leeds, Yorkshire. He had two older brothers serving in the Army.

Frank Brooks
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Brooks of Liverpool Road, Cadishead received news that their son, Private Frank Brooks of the Manchester Regiment, had been awarded the Military Medal. He had enlisted three years earlier and was only 23 years old when he received the medal. Before the war Frank was employed at the CWS Soap Works. He attended at the Cadishead Wesleyan Sunday School and was listed on their Roll of Honour.

Arthur Potts
Corporal Arthur Potts (Service no. 251048) of the 6th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the 27th September 1918. His father, William Potts of 103 Liverpool Road, Cadishead, received news of the award in October. The letter included the medal ribbon which had been presented to him by the Commanding Officer of the Battalion. His medal was gazetted in the London Gazette 13th March 1919. Arthur was the only soldier remaining in France from his draft that went out to Gallipoli in 1915. Before the war Arthur was employed at the Wallpaper works of Messrs. Kinder and Co., Dean Road, Cadishead. He attended the Cadishead Primitive Methodist Mission and Sunday school, where he filled the position of secretary. He was well known and respected in the district. He returned to the wallpaper works after the war and worked there for many years. Arthur married Edith Wright on the 18th December 1918 at the Primitive Methodist Chapel, Glazebrook. He chose Clement Wright, the man he had saved on the battlefield, as his Best Man.

Stanley Stocks
Company Sergeant Major Stanley Stocks of the Kings Royal Rifles was awarded both the Distinguished Conduct Medal and the Military Medal. He ended the war in hospital in Netley suffering from the effects of mustard gas. He had enlisted in November 1914 and was among the first volunteers from the district. He had been wounded three times previously. At the time, he was 27 years old. Before the war Stanley lodged in Silver Street, Irlam, and was employed as a foreman by Mr. J. J. Upton, farmer and nurseryman. He married during the war. 

General
Before the opening ceremony, Mr. Cooper presented five medals for bravery won in the war. The first was the DCM to Councillor and ex-Sergeant (Acting Battery Quartermaster) Tom Cordingley of the Royal Garrison Artillery, which was awarded for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He had done good work with the battery during the enemy advance and, although wounded, got a rifle and ammunition and helped to check the advance until reinforcements arrived. Cordingley was loudly cheered as Mr. Cooper pinned the medal on his chest. Ex-Private Tom Povah of the 12th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, was given the welcome of a popular favourite by his colleagues, when he was presented with the Military Medal for carrying dispatches under shell-fire on August 4th, 1916. The Military Medal was also presented to Sergeant Samuel Wilkes of the 2nd Battalion of the Manchester Regiment, for devotion to duty whilst leading his platoon into action on October 1st 1918. Ex-Sergeant McArthur, of the 10th Battalion of the Lancashire Fusiliers was presented with the Military Medal for carrying wounded under shell-fire, although he was also wounded, on February 16th, 1918. The Battalion was at the time in the trenches at Graincourt. Ex-Private George Briggs, a former Lewis gunner, was awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in carrying wounded under fire on October 4th, 1917.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: timberman on December 20, 2009, 09:48:26 AM
Hi Pete

That is brilliant. When are you hoping to have the book published ???

Timberman
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on December 20, 2009, 02:38:31 PM
Hi Pete, Many thanks for your help.The man you are looking for is 54953 SJT JAMES A LEEDER 10/BN R.W.FUS. Won the MM as a Cpl MM L/GAZ 16.8.17. He later served as 55513 YORK AND  LANCS REGT.MM Awarded for the Battle of ARRAS. Medal entitlement MM/BWM/VIC HOPE THIS IS HELPFUL, LET ME KNOW ANY OTHER MM PROBLEMS. Best wishes, Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on December 21, 2009, 12:38:09 PM
Dear Keith ,Your Grandfather was John Levi Kendall. He enlisted as 1360 in the Manchester Regt and landed in Gallipoli on 21.7.15.He was at some stage transferred to the MGC and served with 42nd Battalion /mgc with whom he won the MM London Gazette 13.3.19. this indicates MM won for  The Battle of Amiens most awards for this L/G date are for 8th August 1918. His MGC number was 39627 and at the time of his award his rank was Corporal.His MGC BN is noted in action on21/23 .8 18. and this may be the action for his award.(Battle of the ANCRE)Hope this is helpful. Best w. Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 21, 2009, 12:47:30 PM
051 Company Sergeant Major J. Ashworth, 24th Manchester Regiment
D.C.M. London Gazette 1.1.1919 14051 C./S./M. J. Ashworth, M.M., 24th (S) Bn. (P), Manch. R. (Oldham) (Italy).

''He has performed exceptionally valuable services as C.S.M. for over twenty months. Always courageous and energetic, he sets an excellent example to the N.C.O.s and men under him. During the offensive operations at Beaumont Hamel, 16th December-17th January; at Bullecourt, May-17th July; and east of Ypres, September-17th October, his coolness under the heaviest shell fire and his personal influence with his men were frequently and largely instrumental in the completion of urgent work. On several occasions during the period under consideration he was in charge of important wiring to No Man''s Land, south of Asiago, when his energy and determination contributed largely to the quality of the results achieved.''

M.M. London Gazette 9.12.1916 14051 Sjt. J. Ashworth, Manch. R.

14051 Company Sergeant Major James Ashworth, D.C.M., M.M., served with the 24th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers), Manchester Regiment in the French Theatre of War from 9.11.1915; his Battalion took part in the operations during the Somme offensive, including the attack on Mametz, 1.7.1916, where they were employed working in the communication trenches and strong points, and wired the whole of the front during the following night; later took part in 7th Division''s operations on the Bazentin Ridge, 14-17.7.1916; and the attack on High Wood, 20.7.1916; later worked on the roads in the Delville Wood area, and took part in the operations around Guillemont, 3-7.9.1916, before moving onto the Ypres sector. Awarded the D.C.M. for his gallantry during the Asiago offensive, serving with the 7th Division, which culminated with the Austrian retreat, 31.10.1918.

James ashworth, whilst commanding a platoon during the night of 1 – 2 September 1916, he was wounded in the leg and knocked down by a piece of shrapnel, but still carried on. He continued to supervise the work of his platoon until wounded a second time, when he had to be carried away. He returned to duty 16.09.16,

He was born 1890 and lived 36 Ogden st chadderton. He attended the 50th annual reunion when he was chairman of the old comrades association. He attended all the meeting except for one. 1950 – 1968, he was chairman from 1957, his address in 1964 was 35 parkway chadderton

this was passed on to me from davesmedals  from the British Medals Forum
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on December 21, 2009, 06:04:05 PM
Many thanks for that one. Best w. Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on December 30, 2009, 02:33:42 AM
A storming group, thanks for the info. Best wishes, Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 30, 2009, 04:03:40 PM
 pte 5780- 357034 Thomas Robinson Hoyle kings Liverpool
lg 7 oct 1918   

 pte 9549 john kirkham  2bn LANCS FUS l.g. 1/9/1916 credited with being the first LAN FUS  to be awarded the mm.
both men given life memberships to the layton institute Blackpool in recognition of their awards John Kirkham  worked has a postman for many years in Blackpool he died in 1978 aged 83, a layton man, taken from my research and bl/pool evening gazette 3/0ct/1978 i am not sure if this is the date john  died or the date in the paper.
i will post more info later,
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on December 31, 2009, 01:05:32 AM
Hi Tonyrod,From the L/G Date 1.9.16 it would appear to be for 1st Day of the Somme.There may be others from this day. If you have any other names for the Battalion with 1.9.16 .gazette dates I may be able to use the Registered Paper numbers to verify the claim. Best wishes, Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 31, 2009, 09:23:25 AM
HI HOWARD, i have the full book of mm awards for the lanc fusiliers ww1 i will have a look
but the mm could have been won any time before that as it was back dated , if you would like a copy of the pages let me know i can email them to you if you pm me your email address.
roll of honour Layton institute bl/pool my research for Hoyle  l/pool scottish and kirkham in photo frames,
all the very best for 2010. tonyrod

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on January 08, 2010, 03:08:15 PM
Hi Tony, Thanks for the additional reply.Your list would be most helpful. My email address has been removed to protect you from Spam.  Please provide this information via our personal messaging system.  Thank you. The first MMs were announced in the 3.6.16 gazette.Overall if awards were won together or recommended together they bear consecutive Schedule nos thats where Ican establish who won what first!!!The first MMawards were as early as 1914 when 2 were awarded for the bombardment of Hartlepool.Best w. Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 11, 2010, 09:01:15 AM
found on ebay
A 1915 star fullisize correctly named to:
13030 PTE. J. CARTER. LAN.FUS..
in Very fine condition with old original ww1 ribbon
also with the lot is an unusual find:

Hallmarked Silver Card Case engraved:
"Presented to: Pr. James Carter. M.M. by the Teachers & Scholars of the Central Council School Radcliffe, May 1918."
The Case is battered and shuts ok but does not lock close.  The silver alone must be worth something now! Not seen one of these before.

Awarded the Military Medal for Bravery in the field, LG: 23/2/1918. Came from Radcliffe.
M.I.C.: France, 15/7/1915. M.M. awarded for service in France with the 10th Battalion.
comes with copy research:
mic confirms  james carter entitled to a 1915 trio and went to france 15th july 1915

 mm card  for france as a pte with 10th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers London gazette 23rd Feb 1918 (copy included of gazette that says he was from Radcliffe) Bootle and that the mm was for bravery in the field)
there is also a handwritten note:
"A stretcher bearer MM for attending and rescuing his officer
This man the company stretcher bearer displayed a gallantry and disregard for danger which is beyond all praise. He went about attending the wounded and brought back his wounded officer." mm lg 23-2-1918
 
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on January 12, 2010, 01:29:01 AM
Hi Tony,I previously owned this medal and case. I may try and retrieve it price depending!! Thanks , Howard.Itried to advise email address for the Lan fus Roll.Harribob will advise how to contact me. Best w, Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 12, 2010, 07:56:31 AM
Lancs fusiliers mm awards  dated in London gazette the earliest i can find,
 i would think j kirkham was the first in his battalion  going by the dates

PTE 9410 J RIGBY 1/6 BN    3-6-16
SGT 12019 A SMITH 16 BN    3-6-16
PTE 2647 W KNIGHTON 1BN   10-8-16
SGT 7788 W PAYNE 11 BN    23-8-16
PTE 9549 J KIRKHAM 2 BN    1-9-16
SGT 5105 A MORRIS 10 BN    1-9-16
PTE 7700 B ROBERTS 11 BN   1-9-16
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 12, 2010, 01:22:30 PM
a medal parade took place on the 28th oct 1918 KINGS LIVERPOOL 25th BATTALION
MM GAZETTED 14-5-1919 25 KLR, extracted from 25 klr war diary 28-oct-1918
TOUFFLERS, weather fine. casualties battalion training.
PRIVATE 108487 F TICKLE
PRIVATE 25232 J KIRKHAM  14TH BN transferred to 25th kings liverpool
PRIVATE 407123 F WALTERS
PRIVATE 82719 L PECKOVER
AWARDED MILITARY MEDAL . DATE OF AWARD 26-10-1918.
31st OCTOBER 1918 TOUFFLERS.
PRESENTATION PARADE TO GIVE MEDAL RIBBON TO ALL FOUR MEN FOR GALLANTRY IN ACTION.

14 Kings left 22 Div in Salonika (11.06.18) to move to France, joining 66 Div on 23.07.18. 66 Div was out of the line for reconstitution at the time. 18th Kings absorbed 14 Kings on 13.08.18, so this may well be the date that Kirkham left 14 Kings.

25 Kings landed in France in May 1918 as a Garrison Guard battalion, but was converted to an infantry battalion with 59 Div. It came came into action as part of 59 Div 21-22 Aug 18 in the Battle of Albert. Between 02/10/18 and 11/11/18 59 Div took part in the Final Advance in Artois and Flanders.

To summarise, 14 Kings was out of action from at least 11.06.16 (and the Order of Battle suggests that 22 Div had not been in major action since May 1917 (Battle of Doiran). 25 Kings kicked off on 21 Aug. Seems likely that he was awarded the MM with 25 Kings. It would almost certainly be worth a trawl through the war diaries of the two battalions.

                                                            TONYROD
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: nthornton1979 on January 17, 2010, 06:58:01 PM

Hello Howard,

Sounds like a fascinating project (aswell as a marathon task !)

I have quite a few MM groups with research/citations/photos/original docs etc etc

Here is one I purchased direct from the recipients daughter. I have put together a brief write-up (see below)
I have a large coloured photo of Pte Peters aswell as all original documents including orignal hand written MM reccomendation,LG entry,newspaper article,photo with mate,2 x bibles,business card and photo of his friend and Officer Lt Glover,over 100 postcards he wrote home,cap badge etc etc :-

I can provide photos if you let me know what you want  :)

Joseph William Peters was born on 5th June 1897 in Neston, Wirral, in Cheshire. He was the eldest Son of Mr and Mrs Henry Peters of Raby Rd, Neston who ran a local greengrocery business.

Joe was working in the Neston coalmine when war broke out and having turned 18 he enlisted into the 3rd Battalion Cheshire Regiment on 8th December 1915. This Battalion was a Reserve Battalion which provided drafts and when Joe had completed his training he was transfered to The 6th Battalion, The Royal Warwickshire Regiment via another 'active' Cheshire Battalion.


After been involved in heavy fighting, the 1/6th Warwicks left France and entered Italy in November 1917. Going off the dates on the postcards Joe sent back home, I can establish he was with the Battalion when they entered Italy.
They were kept behind the lines and were trained in hill fighting until March 1918 where they held a position on the Montello.
Joe was to send many postcards home during his time in Italy, most of which are very interesting and give an insight into Joe as a person. According to Joe's youngest daughter Elaine, (from whom I bought the medals) he was a very modest man and never really talked about the war. Judging from his writing on the postcards this would seem to be true. He makes no comment on any of the horrors he must of seen and endured. On several cards he apologies for not writing sooner. Here are several examples.

"I'm sorry, I will reply when I can as I have a lot to do at present"

"My Dear Sister, I am very sorry in that not having wrote you a letter for such a long while but I have been very busy. I hope you don't mind".

"I am so sorry at not having wrote you a letter lately but I could not, but will in a few days".

"My dear Mother & Dad, I have been unable to write for a few days but still I hope you are not upset."

I suppose what Joe meant by 'been busy' and having "a lot to do at present" was been in the thick of the action. These apologies from Joe correspond with when the 6th Warwicks were heavily engaged. One such event was on 15th June when the 1/5th Battalion were heavily bombarded before been overrun by Austrian Infantry. The 1/7th in the rear along with 1/8th in support held the line whilst Joe's 6th Battalion were brought forward. The book "The Battle on the Asiago" states : -
"In the course of the day the 6th & 7th recovered Perghele, together with the guns which had been lost the day before, thus completely re-establishing the line; the 6th carried their counter attack that evening into Ambrosini across the Ghelpac. The loss of the enemy was severe, that on our side light."
It goes on to say - "Early October General Diaz decided to take the offensive, and gave Lord Cavan the command"

This offensive involved trench raids, one of which was carried out on the 4th October. Joe was to take part in this raid and win the Military Medal. The raid was to take place on an Austrian sector of trench called 'The Ave'.

'History of the 1/6th Warwickshire's describes :-
"On the night of 3rd/4th October, under the temporary command of Major R W Fox we left our huts in support and filed through the woods down Star Track to the South Sisto Road. Jumping-off tapes had been laid out well infront of our line by the Battalion Scouts, and on these the Battalion formed up about 4am. At 4:30 our barrage came down and the leading Companies found the enemy's front and support lines pulverised and almost empty. Red Redoubt gave one kick and then expired, yeilding up the ghosts of some Eighty prisoners and Two machine guns. A and C Companies passed through and dealt very faithfully with the Quarry "B" Redoubt and Lone Tree House. Prisoners everywhere abounded ; it seemed as if they came trickling from an inexhaustible resevoir in Asiago at the first sound of a barrage, to supply the wants of the Royal Waricks.After an hours stay in the Austrian lines scouring holes and crannies for more victims to grace the triumph, the Battalion withdrew and counted out itself and its captures. Four machine guns were taken that morning and 148 prisoners to the Battalion's Twenty-one casualties all told. The same day we went out into huts at Granezza to gloat over our prowess."

The Battalion War Diary extract for the raid is as follows :-
"At 04:30 hrs the 6th Battallion R War R carried out a most successful raidon Ave N and enemy trench system in the vacinity 150 prisoners and 4 M.Guns were taken and the remainder of the garrison killed or wounded. Dugouts and shelters were bombed and in most cases set on fire. Our casualties were - 1 killed, 2 missing and 26 lightly wounded"

A week after the raid Joe sent one of his many postcards to his Sister. Again he apologizes for not writing sooner and explains "I am quite well and having a good time. We are having glorious weather here now". - No mention of anything other than day to day things like the weather !

The original recommendation for Joe's award reads :- "For bravery and devotion to duty on Oct 4th 1918 ............... and he showed great coolness and determination especially in the clearing of dugouts (several of them unaided) - thereby taking several prisoners. He was exceptionally cool throughout and proved of immense assistance in the location of enemy positions and dugouts.
In previous occasions he has shown great ability and daring. He has been with me on every patrol and has been an excellent example to others"

The following article appeared in Joe's local newspaper,
"MM FOR LOCAL SOLDIER - Distinction has been confered upon another Neston soldier. Private Joseph Peters, eldest Son of Mr & Mrs Henry Peters, Raby Rd, who has gained the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery on the battlefield. Before enlisting he was employed by Mr J Glynne, Moorside and joined the colours as soon as he was old enough. He has already seen much active service on the Italian Front. In a recent letter he writes: "I have reached my Battalion after a weeks leave, and on arriving was decorated with the Military Medal which I won on the 4th of October". He can be assured of a hearty welcome on his return."

The Officer who reccomended Joe for th Military Medal was Lt Montigue Charles Glover who was also decorated for his part in the raid. He was awarded the Military Cross :- LG 01.02.1919
"For conspicuous gallantry and determined leadership in a raid on 'Ave' on 4th October 1918. He led his platoon with courage and ability, and set a very fine example to those under him"


I have with the medal group an envelope addressed to Joe from Lt Glovers parents after the war. It held a letter, thanking Joe for saving their Son's life. Joe's daughter informed me that Lt Glover was wounded and Joe saved him by carrying him out of harms way. I also have what looks like a 'Business Card', with Lt Glover's name and address on it (Leamington Spa) According to Joe's daughter, Lt Glover and Joe became good friends after the war and sent each other letters and cards frequently. (I have been told these letters will be passed on to me when they are found)

Joe was discharged on 12th Jan 1919 and returned home.....No doubt to his hearty reception.

The following paragraph gives a brief account of Joe's life after the war. (Kindly supplied by Elaine, Joe's daughter)

He married my mother,Sarah Edge, from Heswall, Wirral on 19.10.1922. He was born, and lived all his life in Neston, Wirral. Cheshire. They had five children (me being the youngest)
Before joining the army he worked in the Neston coalmine (I believe this closed in th 20's sometime). When he came home from the war, he worked for his parents in their greengrocery business . In 1932 he bought his first shop (fishmongery and greengrocers) and eventually went on to buy four more. He was a very hard worker and was well liked by his staff and his customers. The whole family worked in the business with him.
He retired in 1963 and my brothers carried on the business until the mid 70's when they sold and retired.
As I told you, he was very modest and did not talk about the war very much. He had a large circle of friends and when he retired he and my mother enjoyed a lot of holidays abroad. He passed away in August 1986.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on January 23, 2010, 11:40:42 AM
Many thanks for your interesting info which I have added to list for processing on the Roll.Any info or photos are gratefully received on MM groups, I hope to include all photos on the roll.Best wishes, Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 23, 2010, 11:54:19 AM
PHOTOS and not forgetting sgt charles harry coverdale VC who also RECEIVED THE MM 2-NOV-1917 AND THEN PROMOTED TO 2/LIEUTENANT. TONYROD
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: spingo on January 26, 2010, 08:54:10 AM
Also in same action as Sgt Harry Coverdale, 4th October 1917--buried Chapel Corner Cemetery Sauchy-Lestree, France. Original photo of grave.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on January 27, 2010, 01:57:09 PM
Thanks Spingo
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 19, 2010, 07:59:27 PM
For sale  on ebay is a First World War Military Medal group of four awarded to A SJT T J SOUTHEY RE - although all his medals show his regiment as the Royal Artillery, which he was badged as prior to transferring to the Royal Engineers.

The medal group consists of the Military Medal named 39492 SJT RFA, the 1914-15 Star 39492 GNR RA, with the 1914-18 War Medal and 1914-1919 Victory Medal 39492 A SJT RA.

Thomas John SOUTHEY was Killed in Action on 19th August 1917 whilst serving with the 3rd Field Company Royal Engineers and he is buried in the Roisel Communal Extension. Although shown as the 3rd Field Company RE on the CWGC site, it is most likely that he actually served with the 3rd Field Survey Company RE which would have been involved with producing up to date topographical (trench) maps, carrying out battery surveys as well as producing map boards for the Royal Artillery. Additionally they also had Flash Spotting and Sound Ranging sections which were employed in OP's to find enemy artillery positions to allow counter- battery fire. This might perhaps explain his transfer from the Royal Artillery to the Royal Engineers.

The award of the Military Medal for Bravery in the Field is listed in the Fourth Supplement to the London Gazette dated Friday 25th May 1917, some 3 months before he was KIA, aged just 23 years old.

Thomas John Southey was born in Chelsea, Middlesex, lived in Clapham and then enlisted at Chelsea. He initially served as a Gunner in the Royal Field Artillery and he entered the France/Flanders theatre of war on 26 July 1915. As a Serjeant in the RFA he was awarded the MM. He was later transferred to the Royal Engineers as 245914 Serjeant with the 3rd Field Company RE. He was the son of Thomas and Frances Eliza Southey of 92 Broxash Road, Clapham Common, London.

Along with the medal group is some copied research, including the London Gazette detailing his name, a copy of the Medal Index Card which clearly shows that the medals were awarded under the Royal Engineers medal lists along with another copied sheet showing his details as shown above and a print-out of the CWGC page.

Admittedly a little confusing, requiring further research as to why the medals show his regiment as the Royal Artillery when by the time he died he was clearly serving with the Royal Engineers, albeit with a transfer difference of only 3 months between regiments/corps.

a World War 1 medal with ribbon in very good condition
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on February 21, 2010, 11:41:16 PM
THANKS TONY,HE SERVED WITH 3RD AND FOURTH FIELD SURVEY COYS RE BEST W. HOWARD
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: harribobs on March 08, 2010, 09:45:19 PM
these men of the 23rd Battalion were awarded the MM for their good work during a raid in the Neuve Chapelle area on the 8th May

22745 Sgt  A Hare
22144 Cpl J O'Connor
28512 Pte A Lee
21526 Pte W Townley
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 14, 2010, 07:58:33 AM
RARE & Desirable VICTORY MEDAL awarded to a MILITARY CROSS WINNER of the 14th LONDON REGIMENT, the Famous ‘LONDON SCOTTISH’.

Correctly named to 2. LIEUT. J. A. SMITH.

In Very Fine Condition.

James Alexander Smith was Commissioned as 2nd Lieutenant into 2nd / 14th Battalion, London Regiment (London Scottish) on 30th January 1918 & immediately posted to the Battalion in France. In July 1918, they transferred into 90th Brigade, 30th Division. He was Awarded the MILITARY CROSS for his Gallantry in the YPRES Salient, during the Capture of the villages of NEUVE EGLISE & WULVERGHEM in Late August 1918.

The announcement & Citation was made in the London Gazette on 7th November 1918, & It states…

2nd Lt. James Alexander Smith, Lond. R.

‘FOR CONSPICUOUS GALLANTRY IN ACTION. HE LED HIS MEN WITH GREAT COOLNESS & DETERMINATION THROUGH HEAVY FIRE TO THEIR FINAL OBJECTIVE. LATER, WITH A FEW MEN, HE RUSHED A HOUSE FROM WHICH A MACHINE GUN WAS CAUSING CASUALTIES, & KILLED AN OFFICER & MOST OF THE GUN CREW. HE SET A SPLENDID EXAMPLE OF GALLANTRY & GOOD LEADERSHIP’.

He ended the war as a 2nd Lieutenant, & left the army in Spring 1919. This 'M.C WINNING OFFICER' Victory Medal comes with copy entries from the London Gazette for MC CITATION, Gallantry awards, 'Officer List', & Unit details.



Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on April 26, 2010, 05:07:24 PM
War Medal, Campaign Medal and Military Medal, awarded to Private H. S. Sutcliffe
of the 11th West Yorkshire Regiment.  Medals come with his discharge certificate,
photocopy of local newspaper announcement of the MM and also photocopy of London Gazette
announcement (1917).   All items found in a drawer when clearing relatives house.
Original condition, uncleaned and with one or two scuff marks, as would be expected,
but overall in good condition with original ribbons.
Item number: 230467006019
Item location: Corwen, Denbighshire, United Kingdom

 howard, could be worth getting in touch with the seller
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on April 28, 2010, 07:29:05 AM
WW1 TRIO,  MISSING THE MM,
Item number: 250623000598
Item location: St Andrews, fife, United Kingdom

EDINBOUGH GAZETTE. SEPT 5 1916,
 MANCHESTER REGIMENT AWARDS ALSO,
PTE 9563 M DALE
SGT 14017 J FISHER
L/CPL 18125 A FRASER
PTE 20854 F GARDNER,
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on May 03, 2010, 07:09:25 AM
original Military Medal (MM) awarded to 10272 Pte Arthur Walter Hill,
 6th Battalion Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry (KOYLI).
 Medal has a very shiny patina, but I think the medal ribbon is probably a replacement.
 The medal is correctly impressed on the rim: 10272 Pte A. Hill. 6/Yorks.L.I.
 The swivel is a little free but secure. 

Also included in the auction is my research into the medal which includes:
 a timeline for Pte Hill/6 Bn KOYLI up to his death on 15th Sep 1916,
a copy of the London Gazette awarding the MM (dated 14 Nov 1916),
 CWGC printout and a copy of his Medal Record Card (MIC).
 Pte Hill was awarded the MM for his part in 6 KOYLI/14 Light Div's attack
in the Battle of Flers-Courcellette at the infamous Delville (Devil's) Wood.
 Interestingly, tanks were first used in this battle, and there is record of 1 x tank
 assisting the advance of Pte Hill's Company. 
 A nice medal with an interesting background
Item number: 180502285817
Item location: Ripon, United Kingdo
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on May 04, 2010, 08:00:07 AM
This is a medal issued to Private   John Freddrick Siddall
 from the 7th battailian east yorkshire on  8th Jan 1919
he had served 4 years 123 days he was aged 21.
it is edgraved around the edge 12205 J . F Siddall 7/ east yorkshire r..
he was discharged from the army due to being wounded i
 also have the wounded papers issued with the medal.
THIS MEDAL and PAPERS are  THE REAL ITEM
Item number: 110528174610
Item location: WALSALL, West Midlands, United Kingdom

Military Medal awarded to Corporal Andrew McDonald, 6th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders,
 for a trench raid in September, 1916, when it was found that three men of the raiding
party were missing he went back with an officer to the German trenches three times
bringing in a wounded man each time.   Corporal McDonald was mortally wounded on the
opening day of the Arras offensive on the 9 April, 1917, and died three days later.

Military Medal (GVR), (2266 Corpl. A. McDonald. 1/6 Seaforth Highlanders T.F.).
 Medal in GVF condition.  Accompanied by copy MIC for war medals and MM. 
Copy extracts from local newspapers.  Copy extracts from war diary.
 Copy of London Gazette entry.

A photograph of the raiding party appears in Derek Bird’s book on the
6th Seaforth Highlanders, “The Spirit of the Troops is Excellent”,
and Corporal McDonald is presumably one of the men in the group.
 Further research may be able to put names to faces.

Andrew McDonald was born on 29 February, 1895, in Tomdhu, Nethy Bridge, Inverness-shire,
 the second son of Alexander McDonald a crofter of Ballieward, Grantown-on-Spey,
 his mother was Jane McDonald (daughter of James Grant).  He had been residing in
Morayshire since he was five years old and was educated at Grantown Grammer School.
 After leaving school became a Stone Mason.   He joined the 6th Seaforth Highlanders
on 22 September 1914 and was allocated regimental number 2266.[1]

On the 5 September, 1916, the 6th Battalion took over front line trenches from the
 4th Gordon Highlanders near Armentieres.   Generally the situation was quiet.
 Several times daily the enemy trenches were bombarded by Stokes’ guns and trench mortars
in conjunction with artillery.  The enemy retaliated with minnenwerfer and artillery fire.  The battalion was planning a trench raid, planned for the 16 September, and patrols were sent out nightly, patrolling right up to the enemy wire.[2]  It was later reported that: -
 

Much of the success of the operation was due to the determination displayed by
 Corporal Hamilton and Private Andrew Macdonald, and to the excellent patrol work carried
out by them for a fortnight prior to the raid. [3]


Between the 6–15 September the situation was reported as normal.  Working parties were
supplied by day and night and patrols went out nightly opposite Railway Salient. 
The raid had been for sometime been practised on duplicates of the enemy trenches.

On the night of the 16 September the raid by the 1/6th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders on
enemy trenches located on Railway Salient was carried out.  It was for this raid and in
helping to bring away three wounded men Private McDonald was awarded the Military Medal.
 Private McDonald formed part of No. 2 Raiding Party and an abridged version of the report
 made after the raid is shown below: -  [4]

 

No. 2 Party under Lieut. D. F. Jenkins left our trenches at 7.57 pm and placed Torpedo as
arranged under the German wire at [trench map reference].  This Party then returned to
our trenches and the Officer led his Party out to within 20 yards of the German wire.
This Party was waiting about ten minutes in “No man’s land” before the Torpedo exploded.

The placing of the Torpedos in position was done without difficulty and though some noise
was made it was not spotted by the enemy’s sentries.

Punctual on Zero time the two Torpedoes [one for each Raiding Party] exploded almost
simultaneously, leaving Gaps absolutely clear through the German wire 15 feet broad and
25 yards deep.
No. 2 Party entered by gap made by Torpedo and found a ditch full of water and mud in
front of the parapet.  This may be an old German trench.  No sentries were seen at this
point but rifles and equipment were found hanging up on the parapet.  This trench had a
dummy parapet made of boards about three feet high behind which were the dug-outs. 
Four dug-outs were bombed with good results and after proceeding ten yards along the
trench the Party encountered an organised German Bombing Party.  These were bombed for
about two minutes and seemed to be all knocked out.  Our Party sustained five casualties,
two slightly wounded, and three seriously.  Orders were given to retire by Gap of
entrance.  The Party met a number of Germans coming from the rear.  Three men of our Party
caught one and carried him out into a shell-hole in “No man’s land”.  The remainder were
bombed and many killed.  The Party then retired by the Gap of entrance having been in the
German trenches for about six minutes.

The trenches were found to be in good condition and revetted with wicker work.
On a bugle sounding (the withdraw) and three Very lights being fired in quick succession
No. 2 Party withdrew to our trenches where Lieut. Jenkins found that three men of his Party
were missing and went back to the German trenches accompanied by No. 2266 Pte. A. McDonald.  They made three journeys bringing in a wounded man each time.  No fire to speak of was opened by the Germans till this Party were bringing in their last wounded man.  The Parties were reported all in by Lieut. Macdonald at 9.35 pm
The Barrage opened punctually and can only be described as perfect.[5]  All ranks taking
part in the Raid were unanimous in their praise.  The efficiency of the Barrage is borne
out by the fact that no German machine gun fired for 40 minutes.  The casualties caused by
the Barrage must have been fairly heavy as both Parties report on entering the trenches
parties of the enemy were rushing away from the Salient and thus running into our Barrage.

The enemy were evidently taken by surprise and nearly all seemed to be in a
dazed condition, only two beside the bombing party offering any resistance.
 The prisoners taken were all so frightened that they refused to move over the parapet,
and the sight of the lassoos seemed to make them worse.  All had therefore to be killed
except the one, whom Lieut. Jenkins had bodily carried out.

The Parties wore Dayfield Bombing Shields which were found to be a great success saving
many minor casualties from splinters.
Although it is impossible to calculate with any degree of accuracy the exact number of
German casualties killed and wounded the citation for Corporal Hamilton’s Distinguished
Conduct Medal awarded for his part in the raid states, “…Some 50 of the enemy were killed
and one captured during the raid.” 

Writing home about the raid one of the men later wrote [6]
A great night’s fun…One prisoner was taken back.  A few more were seized, but they refused
to come over, so they had to pay the price that so many of our own brave lads have paid.
 Our prisoner seemed quite pleased with himself, but he was rather shaky at first.  He
handed to his captor a photograph of his wife.

The success of the raid was greatly appreciated by the Corps Commander who awarded a
total of two Military Crosses, one Distinguished Conduct Medal and five Military Medals
 to the raiding party, one of which was awarded to Corporal Andrew MacDonald who became
the first soldier in the Grantown district to be awarded the Military Medal.[7]. 

The 6th Seaforths were heavily involved in the next major offensive on the 8 April, 1917,
at Arras.  A & C Companies were in the trenches east of Roclincourt.  B Company moved from
Anzin to the assembly trenches.  D Company marched from “X” Hutments to assembly trenches.  Enemy artillery was very active on our trenches.
The following day the offensive was opened by the Third Army who attacked in compliance
with a directive from the new French Commander in Chief, General Robert Nivelle, which was
to be a curtain raiser for a larger French attack to the south, along the Chemin des Dames.
   The 6th Battalion Seaforth Highlanders attacked three lines of enemy’s trenches East
 of Roclincourt at 5.30 a.m. and succeeded in capturing its objective known as the
“BLACK LINE.  Corporal Andrew McDonald, “C” Company, was hit in the thigh and both legs
during the attack and dangerously wounded he was evacuated to hospital.[8]
 Tragically on the 13 April he succumbed to his wounds at Etaples Hospital and was buried
in Etaples Cemetery. 

Andrew McDonald’s parents subsequently received a number of letters from those who were
with their son during his last moments.   One was from the chaplain at the hospital where
Andrew McDonald lay mortally wounded.  He wrote: [9]

When I saw him to-day he was very weak, but even in his weakness he shows a fine spirit,
 and was anxious that I should send you a cheery letter for him.  Poor Lad!  I don’t know
whether he will be able to pull through or not, for he is very seriously ill, but you may
 rest assured that all that can be done for him will be done.  He is in the loving hands
of a Heavenly Father, and before I left him we had a short prayer together.

Writing the following day the Chaplin’s worst fears were realised:
It is a very great grief to us all when these brave men pass from our midst, but yours
is the sorest grief, and we should like to offer you our deep sympathy in your sorrow. 
Corporal Macdonald has, like many others, made the supreme sacrifice, and ‘greater love
hath no man this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.’  Those who have yielded
themselves unto death are in the Heavenly Father’s gracious keeping, and in Him they are
safe.  His body rests in the British military cemetery at Etaples.[10]

Sergeant G. Dixon[11] also wrote to Alexander and Jane McDonald that their son was:
….wounded while the first German trench was being stormed.  “Andy” was a great favourite
with everyone.  He was in my platoon, and I shall miss him greatly, for he was a good and
brave soldier.  The battalion was in the thick of it, and suffered a good deal.  [12]
The final word is contained in The Strathspey Herald:

A local Territorial writes thus of the late Corporal Macdonald, winner of the Military
Medal – “He was one of the very few of the original battalion who had served with it since
 its arrival in France.  A faithful, brave soldier, he earned his decoration.  For a
considerable time he acted as stretcher-bearer, and gained the admiration of all for his
 untiring energy and devotion to the wounded.  Latterly he was promoted corporal, and
proved himself a competent n.c.o.  His death will cast a gloom over C Company, in which
he was so popular.”[13]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[1] Morayshire Roll of Honour, page 258.
[2] WO95/2867
[3] The Strathspey Herald, 12 October 1916.
[4] WO95/2867
[5] During the raid the 2” Mortars fired 228 rounds.  Stokes Guns 981 rounds.
   Vickers Guns 29,500 rounds.  18-Pounders about 1,200 rounds.  4.5” Howitzers about
   100 rounds.  Rifle Grenades several hundreds. [WO95/2861 – 152nd Infantry Brigade
   War Diary]
[6] The Strathspey Herald, 28 September 1916.
[7] The Strathspey Herald, 19 April 1917.
[8] WO95/2867 and The Strathspey Herald, 26 April 1917.
[9] The Strathspey Herald, 26 April 1917.

[10] Etaples is a town about 27 kilometres south of Boulogne.
The Military Cemetery is to the north of the town, on the west side of the road to
Boulogne.  During the First World War, the area around Etaples was the scene of immense
concentrations of Commonwealth reinforcement camps and hospitals. It was remote from
attack, except from aircraft, and accessible by railway from both the northern or the
southern battlefields. In 1917, 100,000 troops were camped among the sand dunes and the
hospitals, which included eleven general, one stationary, four Red Cross hospitals and a
convalescent depot, could deal with 22,000 wounded or sick. In September 1919, ten months
after the Armistice, three hospitals and the Q.M.A.A.C. convalescent depot remained. The
cemetery contains 10,773 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, the earliest dating
 from May 1915. 35 of these burials are unidentified.

[11] 265426 (previously 1724) Sergeant George Dixon, 6th Battalion.
[12] The Strathspey Herald, 26 April 1917.
[13] The Strathspey Herald, 3 May 1917.
Item number: 160430831785
Item location: West Midlands, United Kingdom
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: hesadevil on May 05, 2010, 09:30:15 PM
In 2003 Chris Bate,and myself were advised by William Spencer that the Original MM Cards were available to us as the MOD wished to dispose of them.We went to Hayes and collected approx 118,000 cards in 45 large boxes.Since then the card info has been transferred to disc and work is concluding on entering the info from the back of the cards onto the nominal roll.The Roll will contain the following details..NAME/RANK/NUMBER/BATTALION OR SUB UNIT/L/G DATE/CASUALTY DETAILS ,CWG,SOLDIERS DIED/IF COMMISSIONED DETAILS, DATE COMMISSIONED/NOTES IF ANY FROM BACK OF CARD/REG PAPER AND SCHEDULE NUMBERS/BIOGRAPHICAL DETAILS IF AVAILABLE/and finally CITATIONS/RECOMMENDATIONS taken from literally hundreds of sources.Currently I have accumulated over 20,000 recommendations which are currently being laid on the Roll. I have all the AIF CITATIONS,and am on the trail of the CANADIANS about 8000 in all.

Have I understood correctly that you have all the record cards of soldiers awarded the Military Medal in WW1? I have been searching for details of my great Uncle Lance Corporal James A(Alfred) Ryder MM (Reg no 303395) who was killed on 21 March 1918. He served with the 2/6th Battalion Manchester Regiment. All I have been able to find is his record on Wargraves and 1 medal card which does not mention the MM and which gives his rank as Private. So far, I have been unable to track any mention of the citation or recommendation. Various contacts are scouring the 2/6th War Diaries for any mention of him. If they find anything I will pass them on to you for the roll.

In the meantime, if you could give me any details about his MM, I would be so grateful. I am visiting the Pozieres Monument where he is commorated on a plaque, later this year.

regards
Pat
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on May 07, 2010, 05:09:51 PM
Military Medal, 1914-15 Star Trio, Memorial Plaque and Service Papers


 10084 L.CPL F.H. HIGGINS. 5/DORSET: R. mm.

These guaranteed 100% genuine medals and plaque come with: copy Medal Index Card (colour –
 front and back), copy Medal Rolls for the 1914-15 Star and British War and Victory Medals
(confirming the award of the trio), Military Medal Index Card, copy London Gazette entry
and header for the Military Medal (5th January 1917), Commonwealth War Graves Commission
and Soldiers Died in the Great War details, copy Battalion War Diary for September,
October and November 1916 and September and October 1918, extracts from the History of
the Dorsetshire Regimental History, copy Overseas Death Certificate, colour photographs
of his  grave and most importantly a copy of his Service Papers (23 pages).

 

Frederick Henry Higgins was born in Bristol, Gloucestershire.  He was living in Puddletown
, Dorset when he enlisted voluntarily into the Army in Dorchester on the 28th August 1914.  
He was 19 years and 3 months old and gave his occupation as ‘dairyman’.  At a medical the
same day he was described as being 5 feet 7 inches tall, weighing 119 pounds and as having
 a 35 inch chest.    He also had brown hair, hazel eyes and a ‘fresh’ complexion.  
Frederick was passed ‘fit’ for military service and joined the Depot of the
 Dorsetshire Regiment in Dorchester the next day, as Private 10085.  On the 1st September
 1914 he was posted to the newly formed 5th (Service) Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment.

The 5th Battalion was formed in August 914 in Dorchester as part of Kitchener’s
First New Army (K1) and moved to Belton Park (Grantham), initially attached as Army Troops
to 11th (Northern) Division.  On the 29th September 1914, Frederick was posted to
11th Divisional Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps at Sheffield, presumably to
undertake some sort of basic medical training prior to his battalion’s deployment overseas

After eleven days at Sheffield he was posted back to his Regiment, rejoining them on the
 10th October 1914.  On the 8th January 1915 the 5th Battalion transferred to 34th Brigade
in 11th Division.  After further training in the UK the battalion finally sailed from
Liverpool aboard the Aquitania on the 3rd July 1915, going via Mudros (11th) and landing
at “A” Beach, Suvla Bay on 6th August 1915.  Whilst on the peninsular they received the
Battle Honours “Suvla”, “Landings at Suvla”, “Scimitar Hill” and Gallipoli 1915”
(for more information on the 5th Battalion’s time at Gallipoli go to the Regimental Museum website here).

The 5th Battalion was evacuated from Gallipoli on the 16th December 1915 and went to Egypt
 via Mudros.  They remained in Egypt until the 3rd July 1916, when they left Alexandria
for France aboard the Transylvania, arriving at Marseilles on the 9th, moving to the Somme
 and arriving in position opposite Mouquet Farm on the 16th September.  The battalion
attacked at Mouquet Farm on the 26th September 1916, during the Battle of Thiepval and it
was during this action on the 26th and 27th that Frederick was awarded his Military Medal*.  

Frederick was appointed Lance Corporal on the 23rd October 1916 and a month later, on the
15th November, the battalion war diary records that he was awarded his military medal
(probably just the ribbon) whilst the battalion were at Pernois, north of Amiens.  
The award was later announced in the London Gazette of the 6th January 1917.

Frederick was promoted to Corporal on the 9th June 1917 and was then granted leave from
the 22nd November to 6th December 1917.  He continued to serve with the 5th Battalion
throughout 1918, until on the 1st October 1918 Frederick Henry Higgins, MM, was killed in
action, during the Battle of Canal du Nord.  He was one of 16 ordinary ranks killed in
action that day and was buried in the Chapel Corner Cemetery, Sauchy-Lestree north west
 of Cambrai, France.

After the war his medals were sent to his mother, Fanny Higgins of Stockton, Codford St.
 Mary in Wiltshire.

*The attack on Mouquet Farm was the only major action by the 5th Battalion during the
Battle of the Somme.  Other men named in the war diary as receiving gallantry awards at
the same time as Frederick (November 1916) are named as displaying exceptional bravery
during this action, so it is safe to say that although  not named, his award was for the
same action.


Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on May 11, 2010, 07:29:44 AM
not a  military medal but a little info on the 19th bn manchesters.

A 1917 Military Cross GV, British War & Victory Medals to 2/Lieutenant Wilfred John May,
2nd Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment from Northwood, Middlesex who was awarded the MC
for patrol work around Hendecourt 29 May 1917 and later died of wounds 1st August 1917
received during the battle of Pilckem Ridge. With his father's Special Constabulary
Long Service Medal clasp 'The Great War 1914-18'
Military Cross GV
Unnamed as awarded
British War & Victory Medals named

2.Lieut W J May
Special Constabulary Long Service Medal GV clasp 'The Great War 1914-18' named
John A May
With copy Medal Index Card confirming the award of the British War & Victory Medals only,
 London Gazette entries & headers, copies from Regimental History etc.

Wilfred John May first served with the 15th London Regiment (Civil Service Rifles) as
 Private number 1427. Commissioned 2/Lieutenant 26 February 1917 into the West Yorkshire
 Regiment he served in France with the 2nd Battalion. Military Cross London Gazette 26 May 1917

'For conspicuous gallantry. He led a patrol in the most gallant manner, and inflicted heavy casualties on the enemy. He set a splendid example of courage and initiative'.

The Regimental History records..............

'On 29 May a brisk little affair took place. At dusk 2/Lieutenants May & Yorke proceeded,
each with fifteen men and a Lewis gun, to enter and occupy Hendecourt. The latter and his
 men got close to a hostile post just south of the village, and there met heavy rifle and
machine gun fire which caused about seven casualties and stopped the operations of that
patrol. 2/Lieutenant Yorke was severely wounded and carried away with difficulty. All other
s got back except one man. 2/Lieutenant May was more fortunate and entered Hendecourt,
 but opening fire on enemy machine guns to assist 2/Lieutenant Yorke's party, the enemy
began closing in on him from all directions and in superior numbers. On these groups he
opened a lively fire and did some damage, and then was abliged to withdraw his men
adroitly. Hednecourt was captured the following day by the Middlesex & Devons'.

On 31 July the opening day of the Third Ypres, battle of Pilckem Ridge the 2nd West
 Yorkshires were part of 21st Brigade, 30th Division which attacked at 0350.
 The 2nd supported by 19th Manchesters and 2nd Wiltshires. The Brigade was held up in the
 dug outs by enemy shell fire and they just missed the barrage. This caused confusion in
the subsequent advance through Sanctuary Wood, with the result that the Battalions became
intermixed. On leaving Sanctuary Wood they came under machine gun fire at Stirling Castle
500 yards to their front. Unable to cature the Castle until reinforced by 89th Brigade in
 support. Bodmin Copse was taken.

Wilfred John May died of wounds 1 August 1917 he almost certainly received his fatal
wound on 31 July the attack cost the 2nd West Yorkshires three officers killed, three
officers died of wounds, five officers wounded, twenty one other ranks killed and 152
wounded with a further thirty six missing. Agged 22 Wilfred John May was the son of
John A May and Clara Elizabeth May of 14 Roy Road, Northwood, Middlesex. CWGC records
he was born South Hackney, London and now rests in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery,
 Belgium.
Item number: 220603809667
Item location: Warsash,Hampshire,  
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on May 14, 2010, 06:34:53 PM
Thanks Tony,Interest in Roll continues.NZEF Citations arrived airmail today.Still no luck with Tomlinson DCM 18/ Manch R. Think he was a runner pow same time as Evans VC AT GUIILEMONT JULY 1916.cANT FIND ANY DETAIL. bEST W, hOWARD
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on May 14, 2010, 06:58:12 PM
TO hesadevil.....The Roll shows PTE J A RYDER 303395 2/8TH BN MM L/G 14.1.18.My info on this gazette says YPRES POSSIBLY 9.10.17.BUT NO REAL EVIDENCE. All my entries so far on this gazette show Oct 1917.The 2/8 may be a clerical error for 2/6th. hope this is helpful best w, Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on May 14, 2010, 07:02:46 PM
Hi Tony, I got the trio to Craig thanks MM for 1st july 1916 with 2/Seaforth as a m/gunner. Best w, Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: hesadevil on May 14, 2010, 07:53:29 PM
TO hesadevil.....The Roll shows PTE J A RYDER 303395 2/8TH BN MM L/G 14.1.18. My info on this gazette says YPRES POSSIBLY 9.10.17.BUT NO REAL EVIDENCE. All my entries so far on this gazette show Oct 1917.The 2/8 may be a clerical error for 2/6th. hope this is helpful best w, Howard

Thank you so much for this, Howard. I had surmised that the medal had been won at the Third Ypres and this more or less agrees. The 2/8th Battalion were at the Battle of Poellcapelle on 9 October 1917 -  82 casualties. From his Reg. number, Dave on the Manchester Regiment Forum confirmed that James enlisted at Manchester with 2/8th Battalion. They were disbanded in Feb 1918 and many men were sent to 2/6th. James' medal card gives his rank as Private. The wargraves entry gives it as Lance Corporal. I assume he was promoted on his move to the 2/6th Battalion. James was killed at the Battle of St Quentin, 21 March 1918. His Company was at Fervaque Farm. The 2/6th War diaries for the day are as follows.

Quote
21 March Bombardment of front support line ... opening by enemy at 4.35am by HE gas shells. Thick mist prevailed all morning. Boys unable to  assume Battle positions. All communicarions ground .... out.
11am Casualties up to now light 2nd Lt G. Carmichael Killed. Enemy reported in view on RED LINE.

11.15am Enemy reported to have ....RED line between left and right Coys (A & C) hand to hand fighting took place, but swing in mist enemy was able to surround both Coys. Bn NQs formed defensive line on COTE WOOD (N.Line)

The remains of Btn relieved the line running N through CARPEZA COPSE & got into .... with right and left joining our one remaining coy. This coy was re... to to forwards & re... line 500 W of FRERVAQUE FARM to HESBECOURT - MAGICOURT Road. Btn HQ CARPEZA COPSE.
.... of Btn now found to be 12 officers & 150 ORs. on night of 21/3/18. 2 squadrens of dismounted cavalry joined  as reinforcements.
This line was held until morning of 22/3/18, unit surrounded on three sides owing to heavy mist which delined at dusk 21/3/18.

C.A. Anderton Capt

Thanks again.

Pat
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on May 15, 2010, 06:45:27 AM
Military Medal GV named
15948 Pte-L.Cpl J Jameson 8/R Lanc R

British War Medal
15948 A-SJT J Jameson R Lanc R

With copy Medal Index Card and London Gazette entry & headers
John Jameson served in France from 27 September 1915 he was awarded the Military Medal
London Gazette 14 May 1919 the recipient came from Warrington. The 8th (Service) Battalion
was formed at Lancaster in October 1914 and landed in France on 27 September 1915 it
ended the War near Solesmes, France
Item number: 250631088357
Item location: Warsash, Hampshire, United Kingdom

A very good George V Military Medal for Bravery in the Field correctly named to:

35247 Pte. F. G. BURNELL 16/R.WAR.R.
in GVF condition complete with ribbon, ex DNW auctions and comes complete with MIC,
 MM card, LG entry 14th May 1919 and a copy of the Wellington Journal and Shrewsbury News
from May 1919.

The 16th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment were known as the 3rd Birmingham Pals.
The MIC confirms the award of a BWM/VM pair.
The MM card confirms Francis George Burnell was awarded the MIlitary Medal for France with
the LG entry 14/5/19.
The LG entry confirms the award of the MM and states Private Burnell was from Wellington,
Shropshire.
Finally a copy of the Wellington Journal and Shrewsbury News from May 1919 again confrims
the award of the MM.
Other item info
Item number: 110532916593
Item location: Bromsgrove, United Kingdom


Identity Disc s DOG TAG  original  "as worn" named to
QUINLAN D  P 644522 116 BN Can
     
this is the stay with the soldier octagon double hole tag ..never to leave the body
Identity disc
Transfered  to the Veteran Durham County CEF Battalion ll6th Canadian Infantry Fighting
Line Regiment of the CEF Canadian Expeditionary Force
The verification photocopy of Military Medal MM recipient card with this  Tag with dates
and reference numbers for further research possibilities
Other item info
Item number: 200472109053
Item location: Ontario, Canada

WWI Military Medal and Trio to the Somerset Light Infantry named to
3-6040. Pte. A.S.Moore. Som.L.I. The M.M. is named to 6/Som.L.I. All impressed as issued
and mounted to wear. Slight knocks on M.M. Otherwise in nice condition. Genuine, full size
with original ribbons.
Item number: 270576692270
Item location: somerset, United Kingdom

A GROUP OF FOUR WORLD WAR ONE MEDALS
NAMED TO ALBERT A BENNIS - G-35481 PTE A. A. BENNIS MIDDX'R
THESE ARE GENUINE MEDALS BUT HAVING CHECKED THE MEDAL INDEX CARD FOR ALBERT A BENNIS,
IT WOULD APPEAR HE WAS ONLY ENTITLED TO THE BRITISH WAR MEDAL AND THE VICTORY MEDAL!
THE MILITARY MEDAL IS GENUINE BUT HAS BEEN RENAMED AS HAS THE BRITISH WAR MEDAL,
THE 1914-15 STAR MUST ALSO BE RENAMED
Item number: 180505340560
Item location: Aylesford, United Kingdom



Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on May 30, 2010, 09:43:25 PM
Military Medal GV to Lance Corporal Bernard Murphy who won his MM whilst serving with
 XV Corps Army Cyclist Corps later transferring to the Tank Corps he was discharged in
August 1918 due to sickness contracted on active service
5611 L Cpl B Murphy XV Cps Bn ACC
With copy Medal Index Card and London Gazette entry & headers and Silver War Badge roll
entry
Bernard Murphy originally enlisted into the Somerset Light Infantry Private No 15850 on
25 October 1914 and first served with the Army Cyclist Corps in France from 9 September
1915 winning his Military Medal with XV Corps Cyclist Battalion London Gazette 14 December
1916. Murphy later transferred to the Tank Corps and was discharged 5 August 1918 the
result of sickness contracted on active service.
Item number: 250641941769
Item location: Warsash, Hampshire, United Kingdom



Medal group consisting of MM, 1914/15 trio and LSGC. WW1 medals named correctly to
 8054 L/Cpl to Sgt J T Fearon Essex Regt (1/Essex on MM) and LSGC  5998051 Sgt J T Fearon.
 Silver medals are all dark toned. Ribbons a bit tatty but original. WW1 medals mounted on
a brooch for wear.  LSGC loose on ribbon. Comes with copy MIC showing all WW1 entitlement
and lists service as Balkans from 25/04/15.  A very desireable gallantry group.
 Item number: 250641844952
Item location: Doddington, Cambridge, United Kingdom

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 06, 2010, 07:16:00 AM
 
WW1 Military Medal named to Artists Rifles Prisoner POW   
764631 Pte Robert Brown 1/28 London Regiment  WW1   
George V Military Medal   
for Bravery in the Field     
Named to: 764631 Pte R Brown 1/28 Lond R   
   
This is a super opportunity to acquire a Military Medal that has been partly researched.   
Robert Brown was born in 1882, home address Leggatts Farm, Kings Walden, Hitchin, Herts. and was a Bank Clerk, before joining up.   
1/28th London Regiment, also known as Artists Rifles.   
   
This is only one of 15 Military Medals awarded to the Regiment. As mentioned below, Pte Brown was also entitled to the Meritorious Medal, of which only 14 were awarded to the Artists Rifles. This makes this individual and medal extremely rare.
He was also a Prisoner of War, this needs to be researched further.
   
Accompanying copy documents as listed.   
I am happy to email docs, as they are slightly easier to read than the copies printed. His service papers as downloaded are of poor quality.   
Military Medal - London Gazette - Number 30540, page 2409, Saturday 23rd February, 1918.   
   
Copy of confirmation of his award of the Meritorious Service Medal, London Gazette, Number 30750, Page 7133, Monday 17th June 1918.   
   
Casualty Form Active Service   
Embarked  Southampton 16.02.1917
Disembarked Le Havre 17.02.1917
Joined Battalion In the Field 26.02.1917
   
Military History Sheet   
Clearly shows   
Awarded Military Medal   
Awarded Meritorious Medal   
   
Protection Certificate And Certificate of Identity   
Dated & Stamped 12-Feb-19 
   
Statement as to Disability   
Dated & Stamped 22-Feb-19 
He has signed the disclaimer, that he is not suffering, which for a POW must be unusual.   
   
Service Record v1   
Recorded as MISSING in the Field, entry made on the 5th April 1918. 23-Mar-18 
   
Short Service Attestation   
Statement of Service   
This clearly states that he was listed as a POW   23-Mar-18 
   
Copy Letter from his Mother to the Army. With a Compliment slip from the Manager of The
St Neots Branch of the London County Westminster & Parrs Bank. 24-Apr-18 
I think this letter is a request to the Army to send a food parcel to her son, presumably
as a POW.   
The compliment slip shows MM and MSM has been written.   
Robert Brown is listed as a Bank Clerk   
The family address is shown as Leggatts Farm in Kings Walden, Hitchin, Herts.   
I include a copy of his family tree. Confirmed by the fact that his Father is listed as
Alfred Brown on several documents and the note from Elizabeth Brown to the Army is shown
as Mother.   
Other documents include   
Medical history   
Enlistment description   
Medal Card from National Archive, which intriguingly does not list MM or MSM. 
   
I will also include 3 pages from;   
The Regimantal Roll of Honour and War Record of The Artists Rifles. 
These will name Robert Brown as recipient of both awards and enable the researcher to confirm
that he is in fact the only soldier to receive both awards.   
Item number: 350363250661
Item location: Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 07, 2010, 05:36:03 PM
WW1 5 Medal MSM MONS STAR GROUP + Photos 17th LANCERS
WW1 military medal set of three consisting of George V MM,
British War medal and Allied victory medal. The medals were awarded to
242362 Pte J Rycroft 2/5 E Lan R”. The medals have been mounted for display
along with a regimental cap badge, photocopy picture of Private Rycroft wearing
 the MM ribbon on his tunic. The group comes with a folder of research which
details that the MM was London Gazette 27th June 1918.

over 20 photo's

Item number: 120580318174
Item location: Snodland, United Kingdom
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 11, 2010, 06:59:56 PM
A rare Military Medal, 1914-15 Star trio, Memorial Plaque and surviving Service Papers to a man of the 5th (Service) Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment who was Killed in Action in October 1918.  Frederick Henry Higgins was awarded his Military Medal during theBattle of the Somme for ‘bravery in the field’ in action at Mouquet Farm* on the 26th/27th September 1916, during the Battle of Thiepval.  Having already served in Gallipoli, he was killed just a month before the Armistice, during the Battle of the Canaldu Nord on the 1st October 1918.

Military Medal, 1914-15 Star Trio, Memorial Plaque and Service Papers
Frederick Henry Higgins, MM

5th (Service) Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment
Killed in Action on the 1st October 1918
During the Battle of the Canal du Nord


Frederick Henry Higgins was born in Bristol, Gloucestershire.  He was living in Puddletown,Dorset when he enlisted voluntarily into the Army in Dorchester on the 28th August 1914. He was 19 years and 3 months old and gave his occupation as ‘dairyman’.  At a medical the same day he was described as being 5 feet 7 inches tall, weighing 119 pounds and as
having a 35 inch chest.    He also had brown hair, hazel eyes and a ‘fresh’ complexion. Frederick was passed ‘fit’ for military service and joined the Depot of the Dorsetshire Regiment in Dorchester the next day, as Private 10085.  On the 1st September 1914 he was posted to the newly formed 5th (Service) Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment.

The 5th Battalion was formed in August 914 in Dorchester as part of Kitchener’s First New Army (K1) and moved to Belton Park (Grantham), initially attached as Army Troops to 11th (Northern) Division.  On the 29th September 1914, Frederick was posted to 11th Divisional Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps at Sheffield, presumably to undertake some sort of basic medical training prior to his battalion’s deployment overseas.

After eleven days at Sheffield he was posted back to his Regiment, rejoining them on the 10th October 1914.  On the 8th January 1915 the 5th Battalion transferred to 34th Brigade  11th Division.  After further training in the UK the battalion finally sailed from Liverpool aboard the Aquitania on the 3rd July 1915, going via Mudros (11th) and landing at “A” Beach, Suvla Bay on 6th August 1915.  Whilst on the peninsular they received the Battle Honours “Suvla”, “Landings at Suvla”, “Scimitar Hill” and Gallipoli 1915”
(for more information on the 5th Battalion’s time at Gallipoli go to the Regimental
Museum website here).

The 5th Battalion was evacuated from Gallipoli on the 16th December 1915 and went to Egypt via Mudros. They remained in Egypt until the 3rd July 1916, when they left Alexandria for France aboard the Transylvania, arriving at Marseilles on the 9th, moving to the Somme and arriving in position opposite Mouquet Farm on the 16th September.  The battalion attacked at Mouquet Farm on the 26th September 1916, during the Battle of Thiepval and it was during this action on the 26th and 27th that Frederick was awarded his Military Medal*.
  
Frederick was appointed Lance Corporal on the 23rd October 1916 and a month later, on the 15th November, the battalion war diary records that he was awarded his military medal (probably just the ribbon) whilst the battalion were at Pernois, north of Amiens.  The award was later announced in the London Gazette of the 6th January 1917.
Frederick was promoted to Corporal on the 9th June 1917 and was then granted leave from the 22nd November to 6th December 1917.  He continued to serve with the 5th Battalion throughout 1918, until on the 1st October 1918 Frederick Henry Higgins, MM, was killed in action, during the Battle of Canal du Nord.  He was one of 16 ordinary ranks killed in action that day and was buried in the Chapel Corner Cemetery, Sauchy-Lestree north west
of Cambrai, France.

After the war his medals were sent to his mother, Fanny Higgins of Stockton, Codford St.Mary in Wiltshire.

*The attack on Mouquet Farm was the only major action by the 5th Battalion during the Battle of the Somme.  Other men named in the war diary as receiving gallantry awards at the same time as Frederick (November 1916) are named as displaying exceptional bravery during this action, so it is safe to say that although not named, his award was for the same action.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on July 04, 2010, 08:26:30 AM
Military Medal (MM) GV named
18328 Pte J Oldfield 20-Manch R
British War & Victory Medals named
18328 Pte J Oldfield Manch R

With copy Medal Index Card, British War & Victory Medal roll entry, London Gazette entry
& headers for MM and War Diary mentioning Pte Oldfield.

The Medals are late issues, the MM with the later fixed suspender and the impressed
naming style that seen on 1930's GSM & IGS medals.

James Oldfield was awarded the British War & Victory Medals only, these were returned to
the Medal Office 29 October 1923 almost certainly due to the fact he had changed address,
the medals were re issued in October 1930 almost certainly along with his MM. The award
of the MM was announced in the London Gazette dated 17 December 1917 the recipient came
from Salford. The Battalion War Diary records Pte Oldfield of 'A' Company
(Right front Company) was awarded the MM for bravery during the fighting at Passchendaele in 1917
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on July 13, 2010, 07:12:12 AM
nice Military Medal group issued to Frederick W. Wood, RFA. No. 806214.
MM named 806214 DVR F.W. Wood B. 296 BDE RFA - TF. with original ribbon.
Other two medals impressed 806214 DVR F.W. Wood R.A..  All in good condition with no edge knocks and come with the original box they were issued in. Also included is his Wound Badge.

Wood was born in Birmingham in 1894 and enlisted in Sept. 1914 and was  transferred to 147 Brigade, RFA (later 296 Bde - documented). His records show he spent several months in hospital after returning home after being gassed in Sept. 1917.
There is a letter from the RFA Records officer on issuing the Military Medal and a Certificate of Discharge (Mar 1919) recording the Military Medal and the mention in the London Gazette (Jan 28, 1918), Wound Stripe (one), Chevron Two Blues. All documents contained in their original wallets.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on July 16, 2010, 04:13:26 PM
 rare Military Medal, 1914-15 Star trio, Memorial Plaque and surviving Service Papers to a man of the 5th (Service) Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment who was Killed in Action in October 1918.  Frederick Henry Higgins was awarded his Military Medal during the Battle of the Somme for ‘bravery in the field’ in action at Mouquet Farm* on the 26th/27th September 1916, during the Battle of Thiepval.  Having already served in Gallipoli, he was killed just a month before the Armistice, during the Battle of the Canal du Nord on the 1st October 1918.
 
Military Medal, 1914-15 Star Trio, Memorial Plaque and Service Papers

Frederick Henry Higgins, MM

5th (Service) Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment Killed in Action on the 1st October 1918
During the Battle of the Canal du Nord

Military Medal:
10084 L.CPL F.H. HIGGINS. 5/DORSET: R.
1914-14 Star:
10084 PTE F.H. HIGGINS. DORSET: R.
British War and Victory Medals:
10084 CPL. F.H. HIGGINS. DORSET. R.
Memorial Plaque:
FREDERICK HENRY HIGGINS
 
These guaranteed 100% genuine medals and plaque come with: copy Medal Index Card
copy Medal Rolls for the 1914-15 Star and British War and Victory Medals
(confirming the award of the trio), Military Medal Index Card, copy London Gazette entry
and header for the Military Medal (5th January 1917), Commonwealth War Graves Commission
and Soldiers Died in the Great War details, copy Battalion War Diary for September,
October and November 1916 and September and October 1918, extracts from the History of
the Dorsetshire Regimental History, copy Overseas Death Certificate, colour photographs
of his  grave and most importantly a copy of his Service Papers (23 pages).

Frederick Henry Higgins was born in Bristol, Gloucestershire.
He was living in Puddletown, Dorset when he enlisted voluntarily into the Army in
Dorchester on the 28th August 1914.  He was 19 years and 3 months old and gave his
occupation as ‘dairyman’.  At a medical the same day he was described as being 5 feet 7inches
tall, weighing 119 pounds and as having a 35 inch chest. 
He also had brown hair, hazel eyes and a ‘fresh’ complexion.  Frederick was passed ‘fit
for military service and joined the Depot of the Dorsetshire Regiment in Dorchester the
next day, as Private 10085.  On the 1st September 1914 he was posted to the newly formed
5th (Service) Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment.

The 5th Battalion was formed in August 914 in Dorchester as part of Kitchener’s First New
Army (K1) and moved to Belton Park (Grantham), initially attached as Army Troops to 11th
(Northern) Division.  On the 29th September 1914, Frederick was posted to 11th Divisional
Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps at Sheffield, presumably to undertake some sort
of basic medical training prior to his battalion’s deployment overseas.
 
After eleven days at Sheffield he was posted back to his Regiment, rejoining them on the
10th October 1914.  On the 8th January 1915 the 5th Battalion transferred to 34th Brigade
in 11th Division.  After further training in the UK the battalion finally sailed from
Liverpool aboard the Aquitania on the 3rd July 1915, going via Mudros (11th) and landing
at “A” Beach, Suvla Bay on 6th August 1915.  Whilst on the peninsular they received the
Battle Honours “Suvla”, “Landings at Suvla”, “Scimitar Hill” and Gallipoli 1915”


The 5th Battalion was evacuated from Gallipoli on the 16th December 1915 and went to Egypt
via Mudros.  They remained in Egypt until the 3rd July 1916, when they left Alexandria
for France aboard the Transylvania, arriving at Marseilles on the 9th, moving to the
Somme and arriving in position opposite Mouquet Farm on the 16th September.  The
battalion attacked at Mouquet Farm on the 26th September 1916, during the Battle of
Thiepval and it was during this action on the 26th and 27th that Frederick was awarded
his Military Medal*. 


Frederick was appointed Lance Corporal on the 23rd October 1916 and a month later, on the
 15th November, the battalion war diary records that he was awarded his military medal
(probably just the ribbon) whilst the battalion were at Pernois, north of Amiens. 
The award was later announced in the London Gazette of the 6th January 1917.
 
Frederick was promoted to Corporal on the 9th June 1917 and was then granted leave from
the 22nd November to 6th December 1917.  He continued to serve with the 5th Battalion
throughout 1918, until on the 1st October 1918 Frederick Henry Higgins, MM, was killed in
action, during the Battle of Canal du Nord.  He was one of 16 ordinary ranks killed in
action that day and was buried in the Chapel Corner Cemetery, Sauchy-Lestree north west
of Cambrai, France.

After the war his medals were sent to his mother, Fanny Higgins of Stockton,Codford St.
Mary in Wiltshire.

*The attack on Mouquet Farm was the only major action by the 5th Battalion during the
Battle of the Somme.  Other men named in the war diary as receiving gallantry awards at
the same time as Frederick (November 1916) are named as displaying exceptional bravery
during this action, so it is safe to say that although not named, his award was for the
same action.
 
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on August 22, 2010, 06:47:46 AM

This is an original World War 1 Military Medal group of 4 awarded to Harold Lowock M.B.E., M.M.  The group also includes Harold Lowcock’s birth certificate (a copy issued in 1909!), wedding certificate from 1922, a copy of his Will and a couple of obituaries from local papers.

Harold Lowock was awarded the MM for services in France whilst serving with the Royal Field Artillery, which was announced in the London Gazette dated 29/08/1918. 

In later life he was awarded the MBE (Member of the British Empire) for services to local government in Ripon and Pateley Bridge, Yorkshire, which was announced in the London Gazette dated 12/06/1971.

The group for sale consists of the following:

Military Medal – Named to 72968 Sjt H Lowock B.83/BDE RFA

1914 – 15 Star – Named to 72968 Gnr H Lowock RFA

British War Medal – Named to 72968 Sjt H Lowock RA

Victory Medal – Named to 72968 Sjt H Lowock RA

One of the obituaries goes into a great detail about his life stating that he was a master tailor by trade and served the local government for over 40 years as a local councillor and alderman (a service for which he received the MBE).  The obituary also mentions his service in the 1914-18 war with the Royal Field Artillery for which he received the MM and was also mentioned in despatches (MID).

Unfortunately I am unable to find an entry in the London Gazette for the MID, so am unable to confirm whether he was mentioned in despatches.  The reference in the obituary possibly could mean that he received a Brigade Certificate during his service.

The condition of the group is fantastic, I do not think that they have been worn as the medals are very ‘crisp’, ie no edge knocks or rubbing.  The ribbons are original.

The Medal Index Card confirms the entitlement of the 1914-15 star trio and states that he entered France on 26/06/1915.  Also included is a copy of the index card showing that he is awarded the MM which was listed in the London Gazette on 29/08/1918.

Relevant copies of the London Gazette and medal index cards are included.

Please note that the group does not include the MBE, however these can be picked up relatively easily if you wish to complete the group.

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on August 30, 2010, 06:57:14 AM
Military Medal (MM) GV named

47091 SJT H G Puckett 64/FD Coy RE

(64th Field Company Royal Engineers)

With copy Medal Index Card, London Gazette entry & headers and details extracted from his
service record

Henry George Puckett was born in Preston, Dorset a brass moulder he enlisted into the
Royal Engineers for the second time on 31 August 1914 at Weymouth. Puckett had previously
served 8 years in the Regular Army, during this time he served in South Africa from 20
November 1899 to 28 June 1904 receiving the Queen & King's South Afica Medals, discharged
as a 2nd Corporal. Puckett was promoted 2nd Corporal 1 September 1914, Corporal 6 November
1914 and Sergeant 15 December 1914 he served in France from 11 May 1915. Awarded the
Military Medal London Gazette 11 October 1916 he was later Mentioned in Despatches by
Field Marshall Sir Douglas Haig for distinguished service in France London Gazette
4 January 1917. Demobalized at the end of hostilities his home address is recorded as
2 Carter's Cottages, Park Street, Weymouth, Dorset
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on September 04, 2010, 06:54:03 AM

1918 WORLD WAR ONE ORIGINAL TYPED CITATION CARBON COPY
FOR THE AWARD OF THE MILITARY MEDAL TO
260244 JOHN SAMUEL DAVIES OF THE GLOUCESTER REGIMENT,
DATED 4TH NOVEMBER 1918 ,  NICE ITEM
Item number:   200515691705
Item location:   Nash,Newport, Newport, United Kingdom
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on September 07, 2010, 10:03:00 AM
Many thanks for your posts Tony very useful and much appreciated.I have just had in nearly 300 South African citations,over half those awarded.Information comes at present in a steady flow.2014 still the date for publication.Keep up the good work .Best wishes, Howard
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on September 26, 2010, 07:26:54 AM

First time on the market since May 1980!

An Exceptionally RARE opportunity to bid for this MILITARY MEDAL & MGC Badge to a
CORPORAL & No.1 of his gun in the 58th Company, MACHINE GUN CORPS
for his CONSPICUOUS GALLANTRY around 21st MARCH 1918 during the Opening phase of
'Operation Michael' - The great German Spring Offensive.

GENUINE & ORIGINAL MM (GvR) on long riband, with Correctly Impressed naming to :-

54773 CPL. E. J. AXELL. 58-M.G.C.

In Extremely Fine Condition, on old long riband.
This comes with an Original, double lugged 'M.G.C' Brass Shoulder Title & another old MM
Riband. The medal & items are exactly as they were purchased 30 years ago.
Additionally, the lot is accompanied by copy entries from the  London Gazette for MM,
Medal TWO Index Details (One shows Corporal & the other Acting Sergeant),
plus Unit & short Divisional history.

Corporal & Acting Sergeant Edward J. Axell came from RYE, East Sussex & served on the
Western front with 58th Machine Gun Company, part of 19th (Western) Division - named the '
Butterfly's' after their Divisional badge.

He was a veteran of many battles including in 1917 - Messines, Menin Road/Polygon Wood,
Broodseinde & the dreaded Passchendaele. But it was to be during the German Spring
Offensive of 1918, that Axell would really distinguish himself in action.

On 21st MARCH 1918, the Germans attacked & pressed hard towards St. QUENTIN & BAPAUME.

Manning & firing his Vickers gun, Axell fought the masses of German infantry that were
swamping the British positions. For his Conspicuous Gallantry & Devotion to Duty during
this epic battle for survival, he was Awarded the MILITARY MEDAL for 'BRAVERY IN THE FIELD'.

It appeared in the London Gazette on 16th September 1918.

The youngest Regiment of the British army, yet with one of the highest casualty rates.
Known as "The SUICIDE CLUB", the Gun teams of the M.G.C regularly drew unwanted attention
from German artillery, machine gun & rifle fire. Of some 220,000 Officers & men of the
Corps, 170,500 were Killed, Wounded or 'Missing'.

A highly desirable MACHINE GUN CORPS MILITARY MEDAL to a brave Corporal & GUN No.1 on the
Vickers Mk.5, for this Epic battle which stopped the German drive on the town of AMIENS.



Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on October 01, 2010, 01:45:51 PM
sent to me by forum member david123,
 You know about the researching on Robert Conkie my uncle.

 
    His father George Conkie ( my Grandfather ) was also in the Kings Regiment Liverpool in the First World War.  He was awarded the Military Medal which is a great honour of course.  Unfortunately, the medal vanished and I don't where it went.  It was actually promised to my husband by my Grandfather because he knew my husband would look after it.  Alas, it vanished as the years went by as my Grandfather lived with his son ( brother to Robert Conkie ) and his wife ( my parents ).  They are now deceased.
 
    I am attaching the documents I have so you can see my Grandfathers achievements.
 
    I do not know the date the action took place or where my Grandfather won his Military Medal.  Though it was in France.
 
    The story in the family was that, my Grandfather and others were ordered over the top to attack a German machine gun emplacement.  Through heavy fire my Grandfather reached the machine gun emplacement and killed two Germans and captured others.  The odd thing was, he was on his own and was surprised that his chums had hesitated because of heavy gun fire.  This may be only a family tale embellished over the years.  Who knows ?
 
        After the war my Grandfather became a horse jockey ( he was only 5 ft 4in's tall ).  Later he became Head Stable Lad for Lord Wavertree.  He rode a horse for Lord Wavertree in the Grand National around 1934 and came fourth I believe.  The horse was named All White.
 
    My Grandfather was born in Scotland in the village of Maybole in Ayrshire.  His parents were bakers.  I have a copies of his birth and marriage certificates.
 
    I am sure you will find the attached documents of interest and may be visitors to your website would like to read about my Grandfather.  He was a wonderful man.
Medal card of Conkie, George
Corps   Regiment No   Rank
Liverpool Regiment    94371    Private Paid Lance Corporal
Date    1914-1920

 
  
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on October 01, 2010, 01:47:31 PM
more on george
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: David123 on October 02, 2010, 07:20:56 AM
Tony.

Really nice to see my Grandfather George Conkie MM posted by you.

Hope the Forum find it interesting as a new addition to the recipients of the Military Medal.

Linda and David Medland.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on October 04, 2010, 08:21:44 AM
-----------------------------------------------------------------
An Exceptionally RARE opportunity to bid for this MILITARY MEDAL, BRITISH WAR MEDAL & VICTORY MEDAL to Private William 'Bill' Woodward, a Brave Soldier of the 26th (Queensland & Tasmania) Battalion, AUSTRALIAN IMPERIAL FORCE,  who having suffered Shell-Shock in 1916 & only returned to duty in October 1917, received this MM in the Battalion's last action of WW1 on 3rd OCTOBER 1918, when he led a party forward & personally "STORMED A GERMAN MACHINE GUN POST, CAPTURING 25 PRISONER'S including the GUN & CREW, PLUS A BATTALION COMMANDER & PART OF HIS STAFF".

If ever the VC was deserved - It was by Bill Woodward...

The hard fighting 26th were led by 29 Year Old Lieutenant Colonel William MacIntyre Davis MC.

Consists of Period Court mounted Trio for display - Nice for ANZAC Day celebrations.

GENUINE & ORIGINAL MILITARY MEDAL (GvR), British War Medal & Victory Medal all with Correctly Impressed naming to :-

On MM:-  4533 PTE. W. T. WOODWARD. 26/AUST. INF.
On Pair:-  4533 PTE. W. T. WOODWARD. 26 BN. A.I.F.
All in Nearly Extremely Fine Condition.

Private William Thomas Woodward was born in Bundaberg, Queensland, & was a 32 year old Single Carpenter when he Enlisted at Rockhampton on 18th September 1915.

NOK: Father. Mr John Woodward, Mount Larcom, Queensland.

Service number: 4533

Rank: Private

Height 5'10". Weight 10 Stone. Dark complexion, hazel eyes, dark hair.

Religion: Roman Catholic

Unit: 26th Infantry Battalion, 11th Reinforcements

The 26th Battalion formed part of 7th Brigade, 2nd Australian Division

Date of embarkation: 30th March 1916

Place of embarkation: Brisbane

Ship embarked on: HMAT Star of Victoria

Ship number: A16

After joining 2nd Platoon, 'A' Company of 26th Battalion in France, he was soon in action, but was then admitted to 26th General Hospital, Etaples with D.A.H - Displaced action of the heart - later known as an acute form of "Shell Shock".  He was admitted to Middlesex War Hospital on 4th September 1916 for one month, before going to 69th Training Battalion on Salisbury Plain, Hampshire, England. Now Officially 'recovered', after two days leave, he finally returned to 26th Battalion in Belgium in late October 1917. They were  holding the line in the mud beyond the Broodseinde Ridge, & just below Passchendaele.

Like many AIF battalions, the 26th fought to turn back the German spring offensive in April 1918, and in the lull that followed mounted �peaceful penetration� operations to snatch portions of the German front line. In one such operation in Monument Wood on 14th July the 26th Battalion captured the first German tank to fall into Allied hands � No. 506 �Mephisto�. In another, on 17th July, Lieutenant Albert Borrella was awarded the Victoria Cross. Later in the year the 26th participated in the great offensive that began on 8th August at AMIENS, its most notable engagement being an attack east of Mont St Quentin on 2nd September.

The Battalion�s last action of the war was to fight through the deep fields of barbed wire & numerous German machine guns to capture Lormisset. In this part of the operation to breach the Beaurevoir Line on 3rd October 1918, they succeeded & inflicted a spectacular defeat on the Germans.

During the Battle on 3rd OCTOBER 1918, Private William Woodward displayed Exceptional personal Courage & initiative. For his actions, he was recommended for the award of the MILITARY MEDAL for 'Bravery In The Field'.

His Extraordinary Citation of 16th October states:-

"DURING THE ATTACK NEAR BEAUREVOIR, EAST OF PERONNE, ON 3rd OCTOBER 1918, THIS MAN WAS IN CHARGE OF A PARTY WHICH HE HAD ORGANISED ON OUR RIGHT FLANK. OBSERVING THAT AN ENEMY MACHINE GUN  WAS FIRING INTO OUR TROOPS FROM THE RIGHT, HE WITH HIS PARTY TOOK UP AN EXPOSED POSITION. SNIPING AT THE MACHINE GUN POSITION & GRADUALLY MOVING UP TO IT, EVENTUALLY RUSHED THE GUN & CREW, CAPTURING IT.

25 PRISONER'S WERE TAKEN IN THIS MACHINE GUN POST INCLUDING A BATTALION COMMANDER & PART OF HIS STAFF.

HIS COOLNESS & COURAGE IN A DIFFICULT POSITION GAINED THE ADMIRATION OF HIS COMRADES, & SET A FINE EXAMPLE TO THEM ALL. THROUGHOUT THE WHOLE ACTION THIS MAN DISPLAYED GREAT FIGHTING QUALITIES & ABSOLUTE DISREGARD FOR PERSONAL SAFETY".

If a VC was ever more deserved - it was by Bill Woodward.

The MM announcement finally appeared in the London Gazette on 17th June 1919, & the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette on 10th October 1919.

The 26th Battalion were behind the lines in training when the Armistice was signed on 11th November 1918.  During the Influenza epidemic in early 1919, Private Woodward was taken ill with Bronchitis at 1st Australian General Hospital - Sutton Veny, England. He was discharged to return to Australia on 6th May 1919 as "Invalided" aboard the hospital ship "Karoola".

This Brave man survived the war & the peace, & died in 1953.

This important group comes with copy entries from London Gazette for MM, the AWM for FULL SERVICE RECORD, Embarkation Roll, Nominal Roll, MM Citation & confirmation & a 3 page short Unit history.

A Rare & highly desirable AIF GALLANTRY Group of a brave 'Shell-Shocked ANZAC', awarded the MM for the last Australian battle of the Great War. 
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on October 05, 2010, 03:25:26 AM
Military Medal

Named to: 17338 PTE. T. H. FINCH. S.STAFF.R.

17338 Private Thomas Henry Finch served in the 7th (Service) Battalion of the South Staffordshire Regiment.

His Military Medal appears in the London Gazette on the 23rd July 1919 and was most likely awarded for the actions at Cambrai in October 1918.

The medal is correctly named and in EF condition with ribbon.

A total of 68 Military Medals were awarded to the 7th Battalion during the First World War of which 12 were for Cambrai.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on October 06, 2010, 05:30:46 AM
FOUND ON EBAY WITH  PHOTOS
here i have 4 ww1 medals a solid silver working perfect pocket watch and key engraved
to the hero of the village, a trench art letter opener with hill 60 engraved on it and two photos of the hero himself.

the medals are as exactly engraved

BRAVERY OF THE FIELD   MM    L- 12004 SJT. W. TURGOOSE . C 168 / BDE. R.F.A
14-15 STAR                           L- 12004  CPL. CA. SJT. W. TURGOOSE   R.F.A

WAR MEDAL                           L -12004   SJT  .W.  TURGOOSE  RA

CIVILISATION MEDAL               L - 12004   SJT. W.  TURGOOSE  RA

THE SILVER POCKET WATCH WITH CHAIN/ SHEILD/ KEY

on the inside case of the pocket watch is engraved

presented to W. Turgoose in recognition of his distinguished service

in the Great War South Kirkby  Sep 1919.

THE TRENCH ART LETTER OPENER IS ENGRAVED HILL 60 WITH A SHEILD ATTACHED
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on October 09, 2010, 06:51:11 AM
FULL SIZE

GENUINE

Military Medal GV named
150041 Gnr H Payne 151/SGE Bty RGA

British War & Victory Medals named
150041 Gnr H Payne RA

With copy Medal Index Card recording Harry Payne was awarded the
British War & Victory Medals only and copy London gazette entry & headers
announcing the award of his MM London Gazette 13 March 1918 the recipient
came from Cheetham (Manchester).
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: MMROLL on October 26, 2010, 02:01:37 AM
Thanks everybody for your continuing efforts.Have established contact in Canada and hundreds of Canadian citations have come in.The GSWA citations arrived this week from South Africa to go with the South African awards for France and east African ones received a few weeks back.We are definitely going places with this.Best wishes, Howard
Title: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: englandphil on October 27, 2010, 11:19:18 AM
I am currently in the process of researching the names of 377 WW2 casualties that had strong associations with the the town of Widnes, lancs.  One of the civilian casualties listed is the Military Medal winning Richard Mercer shown below who was killed whilst working at Liverpool Docks during the blitz.

A search of the online Gazete Records, identified the medal winner as 61433 Pte. (L./C.)- Mercer, R., 12th Bn. (Widnes). of the Manchester Regiment, whose award was gazetted as follows  (Gazette Issue 31338 published on the 13 May 1919. Page 37 of 64 )

I would appreciate any assistance that is available in finding out about this mans WW1 service and the situatoin under which he was awarded the M.M.

Due to the circumstances of his death in 1941, it is possible that he was buried in the mass grave at Anfield Cemetery, but at this stage I have not been able to confirm this.

Name: MERCER, RICHARD
Nationality: United Kingdom
Rank: Civilian
Regiment/Service: Civilian War Dead
Age: 44
Date of Death: 03/05/1941
Awards: M M
Additional information: Son of the late Richard and A. Mercer, of 7 Irwell Street, Widnes; husband of Elizabeth Mercer, of 146 Blenheim Street. Died at Salthouse Dock.
Reporting Authority: LIVERPOOL, COUNTY BOROUGH

Regards

Phil
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on October 28, 2010, 07:06:44 PM
hi phil, and welcome to the forum, unless its recorded in the 12 battalion war dairy, it could be very hard to find out how he won his mm, in the same SUPPLEMENT TO THE EDINBURGH GAZETTE, MAY 16, 1919. 1689 (same as London gazette) some 64 mm were won by the Manchester regiment, you can read up on this 12 battalion link, http://www.themanchesters.org/12th%20batt.htm not a lot on 1917-18 work in progress i think.
 good luck with your search. tonyrod

link to my family site, http://tonyrod.webs.com/

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on November 05, 2010, 02:08:39 PM
A rare Military Medal, 1914-15 Star trio, Memorial Plaque and surviving Service Papers
to a man of the 5th (Service) Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment who was Killed in Action
in October 1918.  Frederick Henry Higgins was awarded his Military Medal during the
Battle of the Somme for �bravery in the field� in action at Mouquet Farm* on the 26th/27th
September 1916, during the Battle of Thiepval.  Having already served in Gallipoli,
he was killed just a month before the Armistice, during the Battle of the Canal du Nord
on the 1st October 1918.

Military Medal, 1914-15 Star Trio, Memorial Plaque and Service Papers
Frederick Henry Higgins, MM

5th (Service) Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment
Killed in Action on the 1st October 1918
During the Battle of the Canal du Nord
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on November 20, 2010, 08:37:20 AM
Military Medal GV named
13517 Dvr A T Taylor 55 Bty RFA

With copy Medal Index Card and some details extracted from his service record

Alfred Thomas Taylor was born in 1895 he attested for the Royal Field Artillery
11 March 1912 and served in France with 37th Brigade Royal Field Artillery from
23 August 1914. Wounded in France on 25 July 1917 he was awarded the Military Medal
London Gazette 21 October 1918 and discharged 23 May 1919. The recipient resided at
58 Queens Street, Rochester, Kent.
Item number: 250729488805

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: nomansland on November 25, 2010, 09:38:51 PM
Hi Howard i have a full?? list of all the manchester regiment MM awards which i have been sorting for work on a book on the Manchesters you are most welcome to a copy if you P/M me with you address will put on disc for you have managed to find all their service numbers but do not have the citations good luck with your project and if you have anything on 2nd batt would apreciate a copy cheers David
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: hesadevil on November 25, 2010, 10:05:24 PM
have been sorting for work on a book on the Manchesters.

Three questions for you.

How far advanced are you with the book? What is its title? Are you concentrating on a particular battallion or war?

Pat
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 03, 2010, 07:39:38 AM
Consists of MILITARY MEDAL (GvR) with Correctly Impressed naming to :-

8569 PTE - L. CPL. G. KIRKMAN. 9 / M.G.C.

British War Medal & Victory Medal, both with Correctly Impressed naming to :-

8569 PTE. G. KIRKMAN. M.G.C.

All three medals in Extremely Fine Condition with old, stitched ribands.

Private & Lance Corporal George Kirkman came from the Greek Island of RHODES in the Aegean Sea, was a very early enlistment into the Machine Gun Corps as No. 8569. He served on the Western front with 9th Machine Gun Company, part of 3rd (Regular) Division.

9th Machine Gun Company arrived in France in early February 1916, confirming his entitlement to the BWM/Victory PAIR ONLY.

He was a veteran of many battles including the SOMME in 1916, & in 1917 - ARRAS, PASSCHENDAELE & CAMBRAI. But it was to be during the German Spring Offensive of 1918, that Kirkman would really distinguish himself in action.

On 21st MARCH 1918, the Germans attacked & pressed hard towards St. QUENTIN. Lance Corporal Kirkman helped to man & fire his Vickers gun against the masses of German infantry that were swamping the British positions.

For his Conspicuous Gallantry & Devotion to Duty during this epic battle for the British Army's survival, he was Awarded the MILITARY MEDAL for 'BRAVERY IN THE FIELD'. It appeared in the London Gazette on 25th JUNE 1918.

M.G.C - The youngest Regiment of the British army, yet with one of the highest casualty rates. Known as "The SUICIDE CLUB", the Gun teams of the M.G.C regularly drew unwanted attention from German artillery, machine gun & rifle fire. Of some 220,000 Officers & men of the Corps, 170,500 were Killed, Wounded or 'Missing'.

Comes with copy entries from the London Gazette for MM, Medal Index Details, plus short Unit & Divisional research.

A highly desirable 'MACHINE GUN CORPS' MILITARY MEDAL & PAIR to a brave Lance Corporal & Gunner on the Vickers Mk.5, for this Epic battle which slowed the German drive across the SOMME in 1918.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 05, 2010, 08:17:11 AM
A Scarce MILITARY MEDAL to a SERJEANT of 1st / 8th DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY,
who was KILLED IN ACTION during the GERMAN SPRING Offensive,
whilst Defending the SOMME CROSSING�S near St. QUENTIN on 25th MARCH 1918.
He was 30 Years old.

Consists of MILITARY MEDAL (GvR) with Correctly Impressed naming to :-

4-8780 SGT. F. W. MULLETT. 1 / 8 DURH. L.I. - T.F.

In Nearly Extremely Fine Condition.

Sergeant Fred W. Mullett came from Gillingham, Kent.
 He was living with his parents at 215 Pier Road, Gillingham,
when he Enlisted into the Durham Light Infantry.
He served on the Western front with 8th (Territorial Force) Battalion,
part of 50th (Northumbrian) Division. He was a veteran of many battles
including the SOMME in 1916, ARRAS & PASSCHENDAELE in 1917.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

A Scarce MILITARY MEDAL to a CORPORAL of 2nd / 5th LOYAL NORTH LANCASHIRE Regiment,
who was KILLED IN ACTION during the BATTLE OF THE CANAL DU NORD near PROVILLE on
2nd OCTOBER 1918.

Consists of MILITARY MEDAL (GvR) with Correctly Impressed naming to :-

241405 CPL. J. MATHER. 2 / 5 L.N.L. - T.F.

In Nearly Extremely Fine Condition.

Corporal Joseph Mather came from Gillingham, Kent. He was living with his parents at
215 Pier Road, Gillingham, when he Enlisted at Bolton into the Loyal North Lancs in
late 1916. Given the Service No. 3248, he served on the Western front with
2nd / 5th (Bolton) - (Territorial Force) Battalion, part of 55th ( West Lancashire)
Division. He was a veteran of many battles including ARRAS & PASSCHENDAELE in 1917,
& AMIENS in 1918.

The men of the Territorial Force were all re-numbered in 1917, so he became No. 241405.

Comes with copy entries from CWGC, the London Gazette for MM, Medal Index Details,
plus Unit & short D
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Wendi on December 14, 2010, 05:29:17 PM
Discussion going on here (http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=501528.new#new) regarding E K Newhouse
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 17, 2010, 09:47:36 AM
cheers wendi, i have replied , but i don't have anything on him myself, just posted info on were he was at the time of his death,  ;D
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 18, 2010, 10:15:54 AM
A rare Military Medal, 1914-15 Star trio, Memorial Plaque and surviving Service Papers
to a man of the 5th (Service) Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment who was Killed in Action
in October 1918.  Frederick Henry Higgins was awarded his Military Medal during the
Battle of the Somme for ‘bravery in the field’ in action at Mouquet Farm*
on the 26th/27th September 1916, during the Battle of Thiepval. 
Having already served in Gallipoli, he was killed just a month before the Armistice,
during the Battle of the Canal du Nord on the 1st October 1918.

Military Medal, 1914-15 Star Trio, Memorial Plaque and Service Papers
Frederick Henry Higgins, MM
5th (Service) Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment
Killed in Action on the 1st October 1918
During the Battle of the Canal du Nord
Item number: 120661648014
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Roughyed on December 27, 2010, 05:00:29 PM
Hi

My great uncle William Mayall 1st COY MGC Reg No 67720 won the MM and was cited in the LG on 23 Feb 1918.  I wonder if you could shed any light on how he came to be awarded with the medal?  I understand it was for bravery in the field.

Any help would be appreciated!

Phil
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 27, 2010, 06:33:29 PM
hi phil,  check out the two links, this will give you a  start,  search local papers, you could have a good chance of finding out how he won his award,  you will be very lucky if you find anything in army records 
good chance he won his mm  at the Second Battle of Passchendaele, 26 October - 10 November 1917.
it was no unusual for mm awards being listed  in the LG. 3 months later and more,
 i am sorry i can not help you any more on this, good luck and all the best for the new year. tonyrod

http://www.1914-1918.net/1div.htm
http://www.1914-1918.net/bat20.htm                     
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Roughyed on December 27, 2010, 09:36:26 PM
Cheers Tonyrod, I'm hoping to get up to the Oldham Local Studies archive soon to trace the newspaper reports of the time - I'll let you know how I get on!!

Thanks for your help.

Phil
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 20, 2011, 08:27:16 AM
A VERY NICE 100% GENUINE FULL SIZE & CORRECTLY NAMED WW1 BRONZE VICTORY MEDAL TO A MILITARY MEDAL RECIPIENT WHO WAS KIA F&F 22-9-1917

IMPRESSED ON THE RIM TO- 18175.A-SJT.J.FISHBURN.YORK.R

JAMES FISHBURN FIRST LANDED OVERSEAS IN EGYPT 14-9-1915 AS A MEMBER OF THE 6TH BATTALION YORKSHIRE REGIMENT ( GREEN HOWARDS. HE LATER TRANSFERED TO THE 9TH BATTALION OF THE YORK & LANCASTER REGIMENT WITH SERVICE NUMBER 34588 AND WAS AWARDED THE MILITARY MEDAL FOR SERVICE IN FRANCE & FLANDERS IN THE LONDON GAZETTE 16-8-1917

JAMES FISHBURN WAS KILLED IN ACTION IN FRANCE & FLANDERS 22-9-1917 STILL SERVING WITH THE 9TH BATTALION OF THE YORK & LANCASTER REGIMENT. HE WAS BORN IN HETTON-LE-HOLE, COUNTY DURHAM & ENLISTED IN HOUGHTON-LE-SPRING WHILST STILL LIVING IN HETTON-LE-HOLE.

THE C.W.G.C RECORDS THE FACT THAT HE WAS THE 22 YEAR OLD SON OF MR & MRS T FISHBURN OF, 19 BARRINGTON TERRACE, HETTON DOWNS, HETTON-LE-HOLE, COUNTY DURHAM & HE IS BURIED IN THE BEDFORD HOUSE CEMETERY IN FLANDERS

THE MEDAL IS NEF OR BETTER AND COMES COMPLETE WITH THE FULL LENGTH ORIGINAL SILK RIBBON &
DETAILS FROM BOTH S.D.G.W, C.W.G.C, THE LONDON GAZETTE & THE RECIPIENTS MEDAL INDEX CARD
DETAILS

Item number: 260724124129
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 26, 2011, 06:38:08 AM

A Scarce “IMMEDIATE” MILITARY MEDAL, WAR MEDAL & VICTORY MEDAL TRIO to a Lance Corporal
in the 9th Company, MACHINE GUN CORPS for his CONSPICUOUS GALLANTRY at ST. QUENTIN around
21st MARCH 1918, during the Opening phase of 'Operation Michael' - The great German
Spring Offensive.

Consists of MILITARY MEDAL (GvR) with Correctly Impressed naming to :-

8569 PTE - L. CPL. G. KIRKMAN. 9 / M.G.C.
British War Medal & Victory Medal, both with Correctly Impressed naming to :-

8569 PTE. G. KIRKMAN. M.G.C.

All three medals in Nearly Extremely Fine Condition.

Private George Kirkman came from the Island of RHODES in the Aegean Sea,
& served on the Western front with 9th Machine Gun Company, part of 3rd (Regular) Division.
 
He was an early, direct enlistment into the MGC with the Number 8569.
9th Brigade Machine Gun Company arrived in France in early February 1916, confirming his
PAIR.

He was a veteran of many battles including the SOMME in 1916, & in 1917 -
ARRAS, PASSCHENDAELE & CAMBRAI. But it was to be during the German Spring Offensive of 1
918, that Knight would really distinguish himself in action.

On 21st MARCH 1918, the Germans attacked & pressed hard towards St. QUENTIN. Kirkman
helped to man & fire his Vickers gun against the masses of German infantry that were
swamping the British positions. For his Conspicuous Gallantry & Devotion to Duty during
this epic battle for survival, he was Awarded the MILITARY MEDAL for 'BRAVERY IN THE FIELD'. It appeared in the London Gazette on 25th JUNE 1918.

The youngest Regiment of the British army, yet with one of the highest casualty rates.
Known as "The SUICIDE CLUB", the Gun teams of the M.G.C regularly drew unwanted attention
from German artillery, machine gun & rifle fire. Of some 220,000 Officers & men of the
Corps, 170,500 were Killed, Wounded or 'Missing'. Comes with copy entries from the London
Gazette for MM, Medal Index Details, plus Unit & short Divisional history.

A highly desirable MACHINE GUN CORPS MILITARY MEDAL & PAIR to a brave Private & GUNNER on
the Vickers Mk.5, for this Epic battle which slowed the German drive across the SOMME in 1918.
Item number: 220729980638
--------------------------
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: Roughyed on January 27, 2011, 11:09:44 PM
Re: William Mayall post above.

I have managed to look William up in the local archives and the first mention of his MM is on December 29th 1917.  The paper states that he had won the MM for 'devotion to duty under heavy shell fire'.  There isn't any more than that so it looks like this is going to be the full extent of my knowledge unless something else turns up.

Thanks everyone for your help.

Phil
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 29, 2011, 09:02:12 AM

An outstanding Australia Battle of Amiens 18th August 1918 Military Medal to

 Private G.E. Barnard, 23rd Australian Infantry, AIF, an original member of the battalion, he served with the ANZAC forces at Gallipoli in September 1915 and later on the Western Front from April 1916. His M.M. was awarded for coolness and courage of the highest order when in the face of heavy machine gun fire and bombing attacks, he ran out a telephone line to within 20 yards of the enemy trenches, and as German reinforcements were coming up called down Stokes mortar fine on them with great success all the while under grenade attack from the enemy trenches.

Military Medal, GVR, correctly named to: (961 PTE G.E. BARNARD. 23/AUST:INF.)

George Edward Barnard was born in Croydon, Surrey, England. He later emigrated to Australia with his parents, settling in Moonee Ponds, Victoria where he worked as a Leadlight importer. With the outbreak of the Great War he enlisted into the Australian Imperial Forces on 9th April 1915, aged 18, giving his next of kin as his father - Joseph Barnard, of Sydenham Street, Moonee Ponds, Victoria.

He joined the 'C' Company, 23rd Infantry Battalion, as a Private (No.961). He was one of the Battalion originals - the 23rd Battalion was raised in Victoria in March 1915 as the third battalion of the 6th Brigade. After initial training it left Australia and arrived in Egypt to complete its training. Barnard embarked from Melbourne on board HMAT A14 Euripides on 10th May 1915.

As part of the 2nd Australian Division, the 6th Brigade landed at Anzac Cove in early September, and the 23rd Battalion was soon manning one of the most trying parts of the ANZAC frontline - Lone Pine. The fighting here was so dangerous and exhausting that battalions were relieved every day. The 23rd manned Lone Pine, alternating with the 24th Battalion, until they left Gallipoli in December 1915.

Barnard himself was admitted to hospital sick with an abscess and diarrhoea on 23rd September 1915, having been admitted to the 6th Field Ambulance a day earlier, and was considered sick enough to be put aboard the hospital ship 'Grampion' and evacuated to England on 28th September being admitted to the 2nd Southern General Hospital at Bristol on 11th October 1915.

The Battalion was posted to France in early 1916, and Barnard rejoined it on 9th March 1916. On 10th April 1916 the Battalion was moved into the line, and occupied forward trenches in the Armentieres sector in northern France. This relatively gentle introduction to the Western Front was followed in July by the battle of the Somme, with the battalion taking part in the horrific battles of Pozieres and Mouquet Farm, after which it was estimated that the Battalion lost 90 percent of its original members, however Barnard made it through unscathed.

After manning the frontline through the bleak winter of 1916-17, the battalion's next trial came at the second battle of Bullecourt in May 1917. After the failure of the first attempt to capture this town, by troops from the 4th Australian Division, the new attack was heavily rehearsed. The 23rd Battalion succeeded in capturing all of its objectives, and holding them until relieved, but, subjected to heavy counter-attacks, the first day of the battle was the battalion's single most costly of the war. Barnard is noted as AWOL from 11th May, however he then appears to have returned from hospital on 18th May. On 19th June he is again admitted to hospital this time suffering from trench fever, being admitted to the 1st London General Hospital. He was continually in and out of hospital through to 13th March 1918 when he rejoined the 23rd Battalion.

In April 1918 the 23rd helped to turn back the German spring offensive, and then took part in the battles that would mark the beginning of Germany's defeat - Hamel, Amiens, and Mont St.Quentin, the fighting for the latter resulting in the battalion's only Victoria Cross, awarded to Private Robert Mactier.

Barnard himself was decorated with the Military Medal for his bravery 'at Herleville, east of Amiens, during operations on the 18th August 1918, this man in the face of heavy machine gun fire, ran out a telephone wire and established a telephone within 20 yards of the enemy. Although the enemy were being reinforced and he was subject to severe bombing he remained at his post and directed the fire of the Stokes guns on the enemy re-inforcements coming forward with great success. His coolness and courage were of the highest standard.' His award was published in the Commonwealth Gazette No.109 on 15th September 1919.

The Battalion fought its last battle around the town of Beaurevoir between 3rd and 4th October. It left the front for the last time on the night of 5th October and was resting when the Armistice was declared on 11th November 1918. The 23rd Battalion was disbanded in Belgium on 30th April 1919, Barnard as one of the originals had returned to Australia on 9th March 1918.

With quantity of research.   

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 08, 2011, 04:03:31 PM
Military Medal, George V 1916-1930 issue, attributed, Northumberland Fusiliers casualty, Somme 1916


e to ‘1849 CPL L. WOOD. 5 / NTH’D. FUS: - T.F.’; on original ribbon.

The Military Medal was instituted on 25 March 1916 to be awarded to non-commissioned officers and other ranks for acts of bravery worthy of especial recognition but not meriting the award of the Distinguished Service Medal and was the equivalent of the Military Cross awarded to officers. The Medal became redundant in 1993 when the award of the Military Cross was extended to all ranks.

Corporal Leslie Hope Wood was born at Seaton Burn in Northumberland in late 1890 to John Wood, a coal miner, and his wife Elizabeth. At the outbreak of war, Corporal Hope was a member of the 5th Battalion (Territorial Force), Northumberland Fusiliers. He landed in France on 20 April 1915 (qualifying date for his 1914-15 Star). On 11 September 1916 he was killed in action in the latter stages of the Somme offensive aged 25 and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial. The award of his Military Medal was listed in the London Gazette on 11 October 1916. He was also entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal 1914-1920 and the Inter-Allied Victory Medal. Sold with a copy of his Medal Index Card and Commonwealth War Graves Commission Memoriam.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 14, 2011, 01:53:35 PM
Full-size medals, correctly inscribed to S-7234 Pte R. Feld, Rifle Brigade (L.Cpl. on Military Medal). In very good condition. Probably never worn and with original full length silk ribbons. Medals had been cleaned prior to my purchase but absolutely NOT over-cleaned, rubbed or abraded.

The 1901 Census shows Rueben Feld as being 5 yrs old (born 1896). He lived with his parents and five siblings at 182, Brunswick Buildings, Goulston Street, Whitechapel, London. His father, Jacob, then aged 42, worked as a Presser. Born in Poland Jacob appears to be of Jewish decent. Rueben’s mother, Julia, then aged 30, was from Mile End, London. Rueben had three brothers, Harry (aged 7 yrs), Aaron (aged 3 yrs.) and a one year old brother. Additionally he had two elder sisters, Fanny (aged 12 yrs) and Eva (?) aged 10 years. Harry later married and moved to number 126, in the same building.

The brothers Harry and Aaron joined the army during WW1. Harry was Pte 18589 Coldstream Guards and Aaron, Pte. 233753 with the 2nd  London Regiment (Royal Fusiliers). According to their Medal Index Cards, they were both entitled to just the British War Medal and Victory medals, suggesting they joined post-1915. Both were wounded and subsequently discharged, receiving Silver War Badges.

Rueben, aged 18 yrs., joined the 7th (Service) Battalion, Rifle Brigade, which had been raised in Winchester on 21st August 1914 as part of K1 and was attached to 41st Brigade in the 14th (Light) Division. They entered France in May 1915, through the port of Boulogne. Rueben’s MIC shows the actual date as 20th May.

. The 14th (Light) Division served on the Western Front throughout the war. It took part in the following engagements:

1915
The Action of Hooge, in which the Division had the misfortune to be the first to be attacked by flamethrower.
The Second Attack on Bellewaarde

1916
The Battle of Delville Wood*
The Battle of Flers-Courcelette*
The battles marked * are phases of the Battles of the Somme 1916

1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line
The First Battle of the Scarpe**
The Third Battle of the Scarpe**
The battles marked ** are phases of the Arras Offensive
The Battle of Langemark***
The First Battle of Passchendaele***
The Second Battle of Passchendaele***
The battles marked *** are phases of the Third Battles of Ypres

1918
The Battle of St Quentin+
The Battle of the Avre+
The battles marked+ are phases of the First Battles of the Somme 1918

In the above two actions the Division suffered very severe casualties, losing almost 6,000 troops. XLVI and XLVII Brigades RFA lost all their guns. The Division was withdrawn from the line and placed on the construction of a new defensive line in the rear. On 26 April, the infantry battalions were reduced to a training cadre. Various units were temporarily attached before the Division was moved to England for re-establishment on 17 June 1918. The refreshed Division, although still short on numbers, moved back to France and joined Second Army 2-6 July 1918.

The Battle of Ypres 1918 and the final advance in Flanders

1919

On 24 March 1919 the Division ceased to exist, having suffered more than 37,100 casualties during the war.

Supplement 11332 of the London Gazette, dated 2nd November 1917, shows Rueben’s award of the Military Medal. There is no citation but given the usual 3 months lead-in before publication, it is likely he won the M.M. in the Third Ypres offensive, possibly at Pilckem Ridge in early August 1917? Indeed, there were only 72 M.M.s to the 7/RB of which 17 have this London Gazette date.

There is a write up of the 7th Battalions war record in "The Rifle Brigade Chronicle 1920" as well as in "The History of the Rifle Brigade in the War of 1914-1918". They were involved in some of the most significant actions at Hooge 1915, The Somme 1916, Flers Courclette 1916, Arras 1917, Ypres 1917 and the Spring offensive 1918.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 22, 2011, 03:07:51 PM
FOR BRAVERY IN THE FIELD’ to ‘1849 CPL L. WOOD. 5 / NTH’D. FUS: - T.F.


Corporal Leslie Hope Wood was born at Seaton Burn in Northumberland in late 1890 to John Wood, a coal miner, and his wife Elizabeth. At the outbreak of war, Corporal Hope was a member of the 5th Battalion (Territorial Force), Northumberland Fusiliers. He landed in France on 20 April 1915 (qualifying date for his 1914-15 Star). On 11 September 1916 he was killed in action in the latter stages of the Somme offensive aged 25 and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial. The award of his Military Medal was listed in the London Gazette on 11 October 1916. He was also entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal 1914-1920 and the Inter-Allied Victory Medal. Sold with a copy of his Medal Index Card and Commonwealth War Graves Commission Memoriam.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 10, 2011, 09:13:24 AM
An original full sized First World War Military Medal (MM) for Bravey In The Field.
Awarded to Corporal John Henry Spencer who served during the Great War
with 'C' Battery 178th Brigade Royal Field Artillery.
He Died of Wounds on 29 November 1917.
Military Medal named in impressed capitals to:

L-8234 CPL J. SPENCER. C. 178 BDE. R.F.A.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
about John Spencer
Name:   John Spencer
Residence:   Lenton, Nottingham
Death Date:   29 Nov 1917
Death Location:   France & Flanders
Enlistment Location:   Nottingham
Rank:   Corporal
Regiment:   Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery
Number:   L/8234
Type of Casualty:   Died of wounds
Theatre of War:   Western European Theatre
Comments:   M.M
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 20, 2011, 07:17:09 AM
257206  SAPr F. JEFFREY, 263/RLY COY, R.E.

This is a very scarce Railway Company MM awarded for gallantry on December 8th, 1917 in the Ypres Salient, whilst constructing light rail spurs the party came under heavy shell fire. Sapper Jeffrey was one of those men who reacted positively under fire and jumped out to save his wounded officer. It is the only MM awarded to the unit, until the German Spring Offensives of 1918 when they were involved in evacuating trains and demolishing goods stations and rail supplies as well as rail bridges.

It is easy to under-rate such awards made ot men in the back-areas, but the urge to save the lives of comrades was a very powerful one and was constant across all areas of the battlefield. Some of the most impressive gallantry awards made for WW1 are in fact lifesaving awards, simply because this act above all others represented the willingness of one man to lay down his life for his comrades. Other battlefield acts are carried out with different underlying motivating factors. Lifesaving, I feel, is the closest to true heroism. Here is an extract from a book I'm writing, about the nature of bravery 1914-18:

      "In the early part of December, 1917, the company was losing men to shell fire daily. It was a particularly unpleasant time for them. On the second of the month, one sapper was evacuated wounded to a Casualty Clearing Station (CCS); on the 5th, a 2.Lt. Robinson was evacuated with shell shock. Next day, Corporal MacKay was killed by a shell fragment; the following day 2.Lt. Farrin was mortally wounded, a Sapper was wounded in the head by an aerial bomb and another man was evacuated with shell shock. A third officer was struck off strength due to shell shock the following week and seventeen sappers were evacuated to a CCS on the 19th December. December 21st finds an entry in the unit war diary: "Good progress made on construction of Y.6 Extension Line, despite frequent heavy shelling in clear vision of enemy". This, then was the cause of the casualties, as so much of the work in the Ypres Salient was carried out in full view of the enemy who occupied surrounding ridges and hills. The company received congratulations; "on the progress made on the forward lines, the good finish to the work, and the good management shewn in handling attached labour". On the day after that note was received, 257391 Lance Corporal Baker was posted missing "believed killed". Two days later, his body was discovered in a shell hole, "he having been killed by shrapnel". On Christmas Eve, 1917, 257211 Sapper A. Snow was "mortally wounded by shrapnel and died in a Dressing Station". Four other sappers were evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station wounded.

      In spite of the operational importance and danger of their tasks, the 263rd Railway Company won just one gallantry award for all their work in the Salient in 1917, it was a Military Medal and was awarded to 257206 Sapper Frank Jeffrey, "for conspicuous gallantry on the day 2.Lt. Farrin was mortally wounded". As is so often the case with the MM, further details are unavailable, but the award was certainly for gallantry under heavy shelling and possibly for attempting to save the life of his officer and other men who may have been part buried by explosions in the forward area. The continual loss of men to shell shock illustrates the strain of working daily for relatively long periods in shelled areas. At least the infantry got regular respite from that".

 
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 23, 2011, 10:00:40 AM
‘FOR BRAVERY IN THE FIELD’ centrally, the crowned cipher of King George V above, all within a laurel wreath; attributed on the edge to ‘1849 CPL L. WOOD. 5 / NTH’D. FUS: - T.F.’; on original ribbon.

The Military Medal was instituted on 25 March 1916 to be awarded to non-commissioned officers and other ranks for acts of bravery worthy of especial recognition but not meriting the award of the Distinguished Service Medal and was the equivalent of the Military Cross awarded to officers. The Medal became redundant in 1993 when the award of the Military Cross was extended to all ranks.

Corporal Leslie Hope Wood was born at Seaton Burn in Northumberland in late 1890 to John Wood, a coal miner, and his wife Elizabeth. At the outbreak of war, Corporal Hope was a member of the 5th Battalion (Territorial Force), Northumberland Fusiliers. He landed in France on 20 April 1915 (qualifying date for his 1914-15 Star). On 11 September 1916 he was killed in action in the latter stages of the Somme offensive aged 25 and is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial. The award of his Military Medal was listed in the London Gazette on 11 October 1916. He was also entitled to the 1914-15 Star, the British War Medal 1914-1920 and the Inter-Allied Victory Medal. Sold with a copy of his Medal Index Card and Commonwealth War Graves Commission Memoriam.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 28, 2011, 08:59:15 PM
GENUINE

Military Medal GV named
300408 Cpl G Lee 8/Manch R

1914/15 Star named
2418 Pte G Lee Manch R

British War & Victory Medals named
300408 Cpl G Lee Manch R
.With copy Medal Index Card, London Gazette entry & headers

George Lee first served in Egypt from 25 September 1914

The 1/8th (Ardwick) Battalion TF was before the outbreak of war
based at Ardwick near Manchester it sailed from Southampton to Egypt
arriving at Alexandria 25 September 1915. The Battalion landed in
Gallipoli 26 May 1915 and moved back to Egypt following the evacuation
in January and in March 1917 moved to France.
 MM London Gazette 22 November 1919.

Slight ek to MM otherwise
Item number: 220761366434
---------------------------
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on May 31, 2011, 12:33:34 PM
Military Medal, George V 1916-1930 issue, attributed
 38th Overseas Battery, Canadian Field Artillery

‘301767 DVR: A. GILLESPIE. 38 / BY: CAN: F.A.
Arthur A. M. Gillespie was born in Dunfermline, Scotland on 3 October 1895
and moved to Winnipeg, Canada in the early years of the 20th Century
 (the 1901 census for Scotland shows him living with his parents and siblings
in Dunfermline). He joined the Canadian Field Artillery at Winnipeg on
23 November 1915. The 38th Battery was part of 10th Brigade which sailed for England
on 26 February 1916. It arrived in France on 14 July 1916 and provided field artillery
support as part of 3rd Canadian Divisional Artillery in France and Flanders until the
end of the war. The brigade was disbanded on 23 October 1920.
Driver Gillespie survived the war. Sold with a copy of his attestation papers
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 02, 2011, 09:32:03 AM

 A nice WW1 Military Medal Group of 3 to a Sjt Percy Pressley in the 16 Manchester Regiment
The Military Medal is inscribed: 40890 SJT: P.PRESSLEY. 16/ MANCH.R.
The BWM and the Victory Medal are inscribed: 40890  SJT.P.PRESSLEY. MANCH.R.
The medals are all in a very good condition with the Military Medal having
one tiny rim knock above the PRE or Pressley.

seelink for more info.
http://themanchesters.org/forum/index.php?topic=5746.0
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 05, 2011, 07:40:42 AM
A RARE ‘PASSCHENDAELE 1917’ MILITARY MEDAL & ‘EPEHY - HINDENBURG LINE 1917’
BAR to the M.M of a former Hampshire Yeomanry soldier,
who won this MM with 14th (1st Portsmouth) Battalion, & the BAR with 2nd Worcestershire Regiment.

MM London Gazette 28th JANUARY 1918. BAR to MM 25th AUGUST 1919.

Consists of MILITARY MEDAL (GvR) with SECOND AWARD BAR

Correctly Impressed naming to :-

33276 L/CPL. L. HUNNEYBELL. 14 / HANTS: R.

In Deep toned Very Fine Condition, with slight edge bump at 6 o’clock.

He was ENTITLED to BWM/VICTORY PAIR.

Lance Corporal & Sergeant Leonard Hunneybell was a native of Aldershot, Hampshire.
He enlisted in early 1915 as No. 1969 in 1/1st Hampshire Yeomanry at Winchester.
He went to France in 1916 with the rank of Sergeant, & served with the unit until
they were dismounted for Infantry training on 25th August 1917. A month later,
he was posted to 15th (Hampshire Yeomanry) Battalion, then attached to 14th
(1st Portsmouth) Battalion, Hampshire Regiment as No. 33276 - also losing his
Sergeant rank.

As part of 116th Brigade, 39th Division, he went into action at the 2nd Battle of
PASSCHENDAELE on 26th October 1917. The battlefield was a shattered morass, dotted
with German Machine Gun ‘PILLBOXES’. During this dreadful battle, he displayed great
courage in the bitter fighting for which he was awarded this Military Medal.

Due to heavy losses, 14th Battalion were disbanded on 22nd March 1918, & likely due
to being wounded in the meantime, on his return he was posted as a reinforcement to
2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, part of 100th Brigade of 33rd Division.

Serving as No. 238141 in several actions during in 1918, he received a Bar to his M.M -
his second award for bravery - in action at EPEHY, during the assault on the Hindenburg
Line.

Comes with copy entries from London Gazette for MM & BAR, Medal Index Card, MM & Bar Card, plus Unit & short Divisional history for the three regiments/Division etc. A highly desirable MILITARY MEDAL & BAR.

115, 589 MM's awarded - ONLY 5,196 Second Award Bars
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 10, 2011, 11:02:09 AM
On offer is a VERY SCARCE, ULTRA RARE, Guaranteed Original and Genuine ( INCLUDING IMPRESSED NAMING ) 1st World War Gallantry Medal Group.

The Group Consists of a 1914/15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal with Mentioned in Despatches Oakleaf and French Medaille Militaire.

To: 8/13857  SJT/ W.O.CL 2. S. WILKINSON. 8th Battalion ( EAST BELFAST VOLUNTEERS ) ROYAL IRISH RIFLES.

Mentioned in Despatches ( London Gazette 4/1/1917 )

Medaille Militaire ( London Gazette 14/7/1917 )

Wilkinsons Medaille Militaire is noted in Cyril Falls book THE HISTORY OF THE 36TH ( ULSTER ) Division, in the section Honours and Awards.

No Other Research Done.

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 12, 2011, 04:28:57 AM
WW1 Military Medal to
13695 Pte F Parr 9/ Suff Regt,
15 trio to 13695 Pte F Parr Suff Regt. With London Gazette copy page of 23 February 1918,
listing him as coming from Shipped (sic) Hill, should be Shippea Hill on the border of
Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, between Littleport and Mildenhall.
Also comes with box lid of box for pair.

According to his MIC Pte Frederick Parr landed in France on 31/8/15
indicating him to be an original 9th Battalion man.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 17, 2011, 12:47:38 PM

Ernest Ashcroft a native of Ashton-under-Lyne, Lancashire, Served in The Great War as
Sergeant 351125 with the 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment surviving the Great War in
which he served with honour having been awarded The Military Medal for bravery in the
 field, The confirmation for the award of The Military Medal was published in
The London Gazette dated 23 July 1919.
Ernest Ashcroft was also entitled to The British War and Victory Medals

pte 2838 ernest ashcroft
3/9th manchesters
110 hillgate st,hurst,ashton
parents,will+martha
age 24
on 7th july 1915 the 3/9th went to southport,ernest didnt go with them,he was transferred to the 2/7th lancs fusiliers.
he later transferred back to the 9th manchesters as 351125
born,20-11-1890
died thursday 28-9-1978 aged 87
cremated at dukinfield crematorium on 4-10-1978,ashes scattered in rose bed B
resided 20 silverton place,ashton
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 19, 2011, 09:48:55 AM

A RARE ‘PASSCHENDAELE 1917’ MILITARY MEDAL & HINDENBURG LINE 1917’ BAR to the M.M of a former Hampshire Yeomanry soldier, who won this MM with 14th (1st Portsmouth) Battalion, & the BAR with 2nd Worcestershire Regiment.

MM London Gazette 28th JANUARY 1918. BAR to MM 25th AUGUST 1919.

Consists of MILITARY MEDAL (GvR) with SECOND AWARD BAR

Correctly Impressed naming to :-

33276 L/CPL. L. HUNNEYBELL. 14 / HANTS: R.

In Deep toned Very Fine Condition, with slight edge bumps at 6 o’clock (See photos).

He was ENTITLED to BWM/VICTORY PAIR.

Lance Corporal & Sergeant Leonard Hunneybell was a native of Aldershot, Hampshire. He enlisted in early 1915 as No. 1969 in 1/1st Hampshire Yeomanry at Winchester. He went to France in 1916 with the rank of Sergeant, & served with the unit until they were dismounted for Infantry training on 25th August 1917. A month later, he was posted to 15th (Hampshire Yeomanry) Battalion, then attached to 14th (1st Portsmouth) Battalion, Hampshire Regiment as No. 33276 - also losing his Sergeant rank.

As part of 116th Brigade, 39th Division, he went into action at the 2nd Battle of PASSCHENDAELE on 26th October 1917. The battlefield was a shattered morass, dotted with German Machine Gun ‘PILLBOXES’. During this dreadful battle, he displayed great courage in the bitter fighting for which he was awarded this Military Medal.

Due to heavy losses, 14th Battalion were disbanded on 22nd March 1918, & likely due to being wounded in the meantime, on his return he was posted as a reinforcement to a different Division - 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regiment, part of 100th Brigade of 33rd Division.

Serving as No. 238141 in several actions during in 1918, he received a Bar to his M.M - his second award for bravery - believed to be for his bravery in action at EPEHY, during the assault on the Hindenburg Line.

Comes with copy entries from London Gazette for MM & BAR, Medal Index Card, MM & Bar Card, plus Unit & short Divisional history for the three regiments/Divisions etc. A highly desirable MILITARY MEDAL & BAR.

115,589 MM's awarded 1916/1920 - ONLY 5,196 Second Award Bars.
------------------------------
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 26, 2011, 07:21:15 AM



Correctly Named :-  4230 SJT.  A. GLAYSHER.  R.F.C.

4230 Serjeant ALFRED GLAYSHER of the ROYAL FLYING CORPS

Alfred went to FRANCE/FLANDERS with the RFC landing there on 24th July 1915.  This date would suggest that he served with either the 10th, 11th or 12th SQUADRONs.

He was ranked 2AM ( 2nd Class Air Mechanic ) at the time. On 18th September 1916 he is shown on a list of men " Struck off the strength of the Royal Flying Corps, British Army in the Field ". He is mentioned as being Hospitalised on 31st August 1916.

At some time he transferred to the TANK CORPS serving in the 14th Battalion and with the new service number  309305. He is shown on the Medal Index Card and War & Victory Medal Rolls as having attained the Rank of ACTING COMPANY QUARTERMASTER SERGEANT

Alfred was awarded the MILITARY MEDAL in the London Gazette dated 23rd July 1919. He is shown as being from HORSHAM in SUSSEX


Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on August 24, 2011, 05:58:31 PM

1509 PTE. W. J. BINGHAM, R. IR. RIF.

William J. Bingham came from 64 Rowland Street, Sandy Row. He enlisted to the 17th (Reserve) Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles but was posted almost immediately to the 8th (Service) Battalion (East Belfast Volunteers) as part of the 36th (Ulster) Divisoin, landing in France in October 1915.

He was to win the Military Medal with the East Belfast Regiment in June 1916 and was reported as being 'Dangerously Wounded' on the 1st July 1916. His father, Rfn W.J.N. Bingham served with the 10th Battalion (South Belfast Volunteers) and was wounded in action on the same date.

extracts from the Belfast Telegraph of the award of the MM for remaining at his post whilst under heavy bombardment,
 his father D.O.W   whilst serving with the 10th Battalion.

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on August 25, 2011, 05:00:10 PM

Military Medal and Mons Star/bar group of 5 to former cavalryman (Trooper with the 106th Coy Imperial Yeomanry) and Gunner with Royal Field Artillery.

Gunner Thacker joined the Imperial Yeomanry and served in the Boer War. His group is missing two clasps (South Africa 1901 and South Africa 1902).

He was also awarded a Silver War Badge for either wounds or illness in WW1.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on August 29, 2011, 08:32:37 AM
Death Plaque - Named -  CORNELIUS CAFFERTY
MM - Impressed - 24774 PTE C .CAFFERTY 4 / R.LANC .R
BWM & VM - Impressed -  24774 PTE C CAFFERTY R.LANC.R
Lancaster Peace Celebration 1919 Medal

Also comes with original medal slips  for the  BWM and VM. Copy of birth certifcate, service papers , death certificate and  court of enquiry for accident.

24774 Private Cornelius CAFFERTY  - 1/4  The Kings Own ( Royal Lancaster Regiment )

Date of recommendation: 29/08/18


Award recommended: Military Medal

"For gallantry and initiative in action near GIVENCHY on August 24th, 1918. This man, orderly to his Company Commander, displayed great vigour in the assault. He was foremost in the attack and afterwards repeatedly brought back to his Company Commander valuable reports of the progress of the operation and the positions of the platoons and sections. During the attack a hostile machine gunner was over-run and was about to open fire from the rear. Private CAFFERTY, however, promptly killed him."

He later returned to England and unfortunately was killed in the following accident .

The evidence at the inquest held by the Manchester Coroner ( Mr C W W Surridge ) today on Capt Adrian Brown ( 28) a test pilot, in the RAF of Annadale House Victoria Park, Manchester and Pte Cornelius Joseph Cafferty (31) Kings Own Royal Lanc Regt, residing at 7 Primrose St, Lancaster. The two victims of the aeroplane accident at the Aeroplane Acceptance Park, near Alexandra Park Railway Station, on Wednesday afternoon – showed that Capt Brown made an error of judgement in turning his machine when a sudden rain squall came on.

The commander of the aerodrome stated that turning and trying to land with the wind instead of against it was the cause of more fatal accidents than anything else. Sergt Major W J Davidson of the Gordon’s, a patient, Fell lane Hospital said that in company with Pte Walker and Cafferty he went to Alexandra Park aerodrome on Wednesday. They asked some of the girls if there was any chance of getting a flight and a air mechanic took them to where a plane was going up to see what could be done. When the plane was ready to go up Capt Brown asked for a mechanic to accompany him “We” witness preceded “asked if it was possible for one of us to go up and permission was given by Capt Brown.

Cafferty and I were the only two who wanted to go up, so we tossed for it and Cafferty won. Cafferty got into the machine and was tied in.

Major Williamson, commander of the aeroplane Acceptance Park, said that on Wednesday afternoon he was watching the engine of this particular aeroplane, in charge of Capt Brown, being tested and preparatory to a flight.

Witness only arrived when the engine was actually ready to take off and the passenger was then in his place. He (witness) thought the passenger was a mechanic as usual. The engine was running quite satisfactorily. The machine taxied out and started in the usual way against the wind. It roses in less than the usual run, which indicated that the engine was satisfactory at the time. “I was rather surprised” proceeded witness “to see it almost turn with quiet sufficient bank to the left. It was quite a safe turn, although it was closer to the ground than usual. He travelled in that direction for 200 yards and turned again to the left rather than flat, which is without bank, the planes being almost level. “The machine then developed a slow spin, which means that if the machine is turned flat she tends to side-slip outwards.

Then she made a rather rapid dive towards the ground – a safe manoeuvre had he had sufficient height, but he was less than 100 feet high and struck the ground before the “plane could recover” The dive was not so acute added witness, that a good landing could not have been made at that stage so far as he could see from 1200 yards distance.

Witness estimated that the machine, which was a British fighter, was travelling at a speed of about 140 miles an hour when the accident happened,. When the machine turned over the first thing that would come in contact with the ground would be the men’s heads as they were about a foot over the top of the fuselage.

Major Williamson explained that before a passenger not on duty could be taken up his (witness) consent must be obtained and in most cases that a higher authority. That was not only a rule of the aerodrome, but an Air ministry instruction.

Witness didn’t give Capt Brown permission to take a passenger and was not present when either the observer or the pilot got into the machine.

Asked as to Capt Browns skill, Major Williamson said that no man attained the position of Capt in the RAF and flew the number of types of machines that Capt Brown did without being classed as a pilot of considerable experience.

The Coroner – Do you think on this occasion Capt. Brown perhaps made an error of judgement.

Witness - It was undoubtedly an error of judgement. What made him turn, of course, is all speculation. Just at the time Capt Browns “took off” preceded witness, a sudden rain squall set across the ground and Capt Brown would meet it before he (witness) became aware of it. “I do not know, “he added whether he then decided to turn back to the aerodrome or whether the rain put him off his course. I think the former is more likely, as the rain would not put a machine of that power to any extent off its course.” If either supposition were correct Capt Brown made a grave error of judgement in turning at all. It was an error that was very prevalent and one that was probably responsible for more deaths in the Air Force than anything else – that of turning back in the aerodrome and running with the wind. “At all costs” said witness “run against the wind even if it means running against a fence or a house, or something like that. It gives a much safer landing.”

A verdict of “Accidental Death” was returned and the coroner expressed sympathy with the relatives.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on September 07, 2011, 07:33:20 AM
Military Medal and 1915 star trio to a survivor of the 5th Durham's "Gallant Last Stand at
Pontevert" 28th May, 1918

Just one DCM and two MMs for this action which the War Diary describes in the most
startling terms: "Casualties for this battle amounted to 33 Officers and 650 O/Rs".
The remnants of just one Company made it back to receive a small clutch of gallantry
medals.
 Private Robert Fleming Kerr, born Roxburgh, Scotland.
A flower gardener at Bradley Hall, Wylam on Tyne in 1911, Robert Kerr entered France
20th April 1915. Awarded MM London Gazette 18th October 1918 page 13. Disembodied
16th April, 1919. We might well wonder whether he was one of those men who had packets of
seeds sent out from home to plant and tend behind the lines.
Wylam-on-Tyne is a nice little town, to this day noted for its market gardening activity. Died 20th February 1960 at Woodburn House, Hill Street, Corbridge-on-Tyne, a 64 year old County Council Labourer, of a heart attack in combination with "chronic bronchitis". It is thought that Kerr was employed as a flower gardener by the County Council.

 With copies of War Diary entries for the relevant period, which indicate that:
"the Battalion suffered extremely heavy, and only B-Coy was to be found.....
they held up the enemy in their front for a considerable time. Ammunition was very short".
There was one DCM awarded to R.S.M. W. E. Holmes "when sent back for ammunition for a party
without any". The Diary continues noting that the enemy got around the back of the
detachment and was now surrounded and cut off; "only a few escaping across the Aisne
before the bridge was blown. This was the last organised body of the Battalion".

 A real measure of the dark days of March, April and May 1918.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on November 05, 2011, 06:38:36 AM
VERY GOOD CONDITION BRITISH ARMY MILITARY MEDAL GALLANTRY GROUP & RESEARCH PAPERWORK.
AS AWARDED TO SERGEANT H. W. DAVIES, HONOURABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY.
INCLUDED ARE 4 MEDALS, MOUNTED ON A CARD BACKING, INCLUDING:

GEORGE V MILITARY MEDAL: 624861 SJT H. W. DAVIES, R.H.A.
1914/15 STAR: 599 DVR. H. W. DAVIES, H.A.C.
BRITISH WAR MEDAL: 599 SJT. H. W. DAVIES, H.A.C. ART.
VICTORY MEDAL: 599 SJT. H. W. DAVIES, H.A.C. -ART.-

A SMALL OVALL CARD BORDERED BLACK & WHITE PHOTO OF DAVIES,
AN H.A.C. CAP BADGE AND RESEARCH PAPERWORK RELATING TO DAVIES,
INCLUDING THE MM DETAILS. (SEE PICTURE NUMBER 8).

BRIEFLY, DAVIES WAS AWARDED THE MM ON THE 14/5/19 FOR UNLOADING A
BURNING WAGON FULL OF HIGH EXPLOSIVE SHELLS WHILST UNDER TURKISH SHELL FIRE.
HE WAS IN B BATTERY, HAC, 19TH BRIGADE, RHA.
HE CAME FROM EAST FINCHLEY, LONDON, JOINING THE HAC ON THE 16/12/14,
SERVED OVERSEAS WITH B BATTERY HAC 9/4/15 TO 1919. WHILST ISERVING OVERSEAS,
HE WAS ONE OF 6 NCO'S WHO WERE URGED TO TAKE UP A COMMISSION,
BUT ALL REFUSED IN ORDER TO REMAIN IN THE HONOURABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY.
INTERESTINGLY, DAVIES AND B BATTERY (IN APRIL 1918) WERE ALSO SERVING ALONGSIDE
THE 4TH AUSTRALIAN LIGHT HORSE BRIGADE (SEE PICTURES 10 & 11)
IN THE CROSSING OF THE JORDAN RIVER.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 02, 2011, 07:59:30 AM
Military Medal GV
282189 SJT H S Monk 2/4 Lond R

British War & Victory Medals
5038 SJT H S Monk 4-Lond R

With copy MM London Gazette entry & headers, Medal Index Card confirming the award of the British War & Victory Medals only and change in service number, casualty details, copies from the Battalion War Diary covering the MM action and attack in which he was killed.

Herbert Sidney Monk enlisted at Shaftesbury Street, North London and lived Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire awarded the MM London Gazette 18 July 1917

'On the night of 12 / 13 May 1917 the 2/4th Londons entered the front line the enemy shelled communication trenches very heavily and the Battalion suffered a few casualties among them was the Medical Officer killed and one 2/Lieutenant wounded. The men were magnificent despite the heavy shelling and the relief was completed by 0130 on 14 May. At 0400 12 'boche' with a machine gun attacked 'C' Company, all wiped out three boche and their machine gun were captured but were killed by their own shellfire while going down our trenches. The enemy shelled intermittently until 12 noon when he put on a heavy barrage on our line lasting about 19 hours the trenches were leveled to the ground the Battalion had many casualties. At 0430 15 May the enemy attacked our line with the 3rd Prussian Guard, but was hopelessly beaten suffering tremendous casualties, not one hostile getting near our line. Relieved by 2/1st London Regiment sent to Reserve Line in Sunken Road, relief completed by 0230, one casualty during relief not much shelling'

Sergeant Monk is noted with five others as being awarded the MM on 27 May 1917.

'On 15 June the 2/4th London's 'A' Company was attached to 2/2nd Londons for the attack on the German front line trenches of the Hindenburg line, the attack was successful. The following day 16 June 'B' and 'D' Companies were attached to 2/2nd Londons for the attack on the support line trenches Hindenburg line. 'B' and 'D' Companies 2/4th Londons gained their objective but went beyond it into the German support line and owing to the failure of the Division on the left to gain their objective 'B' and 'D' companies were surrounded and cut off, no official news has been received about these two companies, but from the German communique it was learnt that the boche had taken about 70 prisoners so it is presumed these belong to 'B' and 'D' companies'.

Sergeant Herbert Sidney Monk is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 11, 2011, 08:26:25 AM
Military Medal (GvR) - '74080 Pte J.H. Hopkins. 139/F.A. R.A.M.C.'
BWM & VM - '74080 Pte J.H. Hopkins. R.A.M.C.'

Medals mounted as worn by recipient.
Military Medal (F&F) London Gazette 29/8/1918.

James H. Hopkins came from Birmingham and served in WWI with 139 Field Ambulance R.A.M.C.
On 28th August 1918, it was announced in the London Gazette that Hopkins was to be awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field, which was likely for his actions during the German Spring Offensive in 1918.

139 Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps were formed in September 1915 (along with 138 and 140 Field Ambulance) and they were all attached to the 41st Division. They served in France and Flanders from May 1916 and were concentrated around Hazebrouck and Bailleul. However, in November 1917 they were moved along with five other Divisions to serve in Italy and took over a sector of front line behind the River Piave, north west of Treviso.

With the Italian crisis over in March 1918, they returned to Western Front just in time for the German Spring Offensive, and they remained there until the end of the war. The 41st Division also had the distinction of being part of the first BOAR in 1919, where they took over the left section of the Cologne bridgehead.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 14, 2011, 06:36:25 AM
WW1 GALLANTRY GROUP OF 3 MEDALS AS FOLLOWS:- 
WAR MEDAL & VICTORY MEDALS both correctly inscribed to 5135, PTE. E. BURLEY K.O.Y.L.I.   THE MILITARY MEDAL (MM) correctly inscribed to  242042, PTE-L/CPL E. BURLEY 5 YORKS L.I. 

NB. - HIS BROTHER'S medals (WILLIAM BURLEY of the M.G.C.) with DOCUMENTS AND DEATH PLAQUE are also being offered for auction - SEE MY OTHER ITEMS. 

EDWARD (TED.) BURLEY JOINED THE KING'S OWN YORKSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY ON 11TH DEC. 1915 AND WAS GIVEN THE NUMBER 5135.  HIS NEXT OF KIN WAS GIVEN AS HIS FATHER, JAMES BURLEY and they lived at HIGH ST.  KIPPAX,  LEEDS. 

HE WAS PROMOTED TO L/CPL ON 2/6/1916.  IT WASN'T UNTIL 14/01/1917 THAT HE JOINED THE B.E.F. IN FRANCE WITH THE 2/5 YORKS L.I. 

IT WAS WHILE HE WAS IN THE TRENCHES WITH 'C' COMPANY ON 13th MARCH 1917 THAT TED WAS ORDERED TO  TAKE 3 GUNNERS AND A PARTY OF BOMBERS TO AN ADVANCED POSITION TO ENGAGE THE ENEMY.  AFTER SOME TIME, WHEN TED AND HIS MEN DID NOT REAPPEAR,  A SEARCH COULD NOT DETERMINE WHAT HAD HAPPENED TO THEM.   A LONG AND POIGNANT LETTER FROM A COMRADE TO TED'S FATHER RECOUNTS THAT THEY COULD ONLY ASSUME THAT THEY MAY BE PRISONERS OF WAR WHEN THEY WERE NOT NOTED WITH THE SLAIN.  THIS LETTER AND MANY OTHER DOCUMENTS WILL ACCOMPANY HIS MEDALS. 

ON THE 3rd JUNE 1917  IT WAS OFFICIALLY REPORTED THAT TED HAD BEEN TAKEN PRISONER OF WAR BY THE GERMANS.  AFTER 7 MONTHS IT WAS HEARD THAT TED HAD ESCAPED INTERNMENT IN GERMANY, AND ON 13th OCTOBER 1917 NEWS FROM HOLLAND CONFIRMED THIS.  FOLLOWING A DEBRIEF AND MEDICAL, TED WAS GIVEN 2 MONTHS LEAVE IN UK. 

AFTER RECUPERATION, TED WAS RE-MUSTERED AND GIVEN THE NUMBER  242042.  HE WAS PROMOTED TO ACTING PROVOST SERGEANT AT A HOLDING UNIT IN UK. 

TED WAS DEMOBBED IN JULY 1919 AT YORK.  FOR HIS REMARKABLE FEAT OF ESCAPING FROM THE GERMANS AND ENDURING GREAT HARDSHIP IN REACHING SAFETY WITH THE ALLIES, TED WAS AWARDED THE MILITARY MEDAL.  IT WAS GAZETTED ON 30th JANUARY 1920

AT A SPECIAL CEREMONY AT KIPPAX, TED WAS PRESENTED WITH A GOLD MEDAL(WHEREABOUTS UNKNOWN)  AND HAILED A HERO BY FAMILY AND FRIENDS.  A PRESS CUTTING ABOUT THIS ACCOMPANIES ALL THE PAPERWORK YOU WILL RECEIVE. 
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on December 30, 2011, 06:18:28 PM
 2nd LIEUT. S.A. FITCH. '

Stephen Arthur Fitch came from Tunbridge Wells in Kent.

He served in WWI with 30 Field Ambulance, R.A.M.C. which was attached to 10th (Irish) Division, and he first enters the Theatre of War in Egypt on 27 July 1915.

On 28 January 1916 (London Gazette) 33542 Corporal S.A. Fitch was mentioned by General Sir Ian Hamilton in his dispatch dated 11 December 1915:

"For gallant and distinguished services in the Field"
On 11 March 1916 (London Gazette), 33542 Corporal S.A. Fitch was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his actions with the Ambulance at Suvia Bay (Gallipoli), with his citation reading as follows:
"For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty at Suvla Bay on 23rd August 1915, when he went out under heavy fire to collect the wounded."

On 19 March 1918 (London Gazette) Sergeant S.A. Fitch was awarded the Military Medal in the Egyptian Theatre for further gallantry in the Field.

On 15th June 1918, Stephen A Fitch, DCM, MM was commissioned into the Indian Army Reserve of Officers as a Second Lieutenant (London Gazette 2 November 1918). The Army Lists for November 1918 and April 1919 also confirm this.

R.A.M.C. Field Ambulance Units of the 10th (Irish) Division.

The 30th, 31st and 32nd Field Ambulances R.A.M.C. were formed for the 10th Division in Ireland in August 1914
In May 1915 they were moved to England and concentrated around the Basingstoke area.
On 27 June 1915 the Division received orders to prepare for service on Gallipoli.
6-7 August 1915 : Landed on Gallipoli at Suvla Bay, less 29th Brigade, which went to ANZAC Cove.
29 September 1915: Moved to Mudros, and on 4-5 October to Salonika, landing there 5-10 October.
18 August 1917, the Division was ordered to concentrate at Salonika for embarkation.
Early in September 1917 the 10th Irish Division moved to Egypt, completing their assembly near Rafa by 16 October 1917.

The Division was involved in the Palestine campaign thereafter between April and June 1918, and after this a major re-organisation took place with many British units being replaced by Indian ones, and Fitch's 30 Field Ambulance was one of them.

When 30th, 31st and 32nd Field Ambulances were replaced by Indian units, they handed over all stores and equipment to the 154th, 166th and 165th Camel Field Ambulances. In December 1918 they were based around Cairo, and eventually left Egypt on 20 May 1919, returning to base. It appears very likely that Fitch then stayed-on with the Indian units in Egypt as a newly commissioned 2nd Lieutenant.

The only minor discrepancy in these documents is that someone has written his name as Sidney on his Medal Index Card, yet his London Gazette entries for his commission etc give his name as Stephen Arthur Fitch, DCM, MM. His Medal Index Card also confirms these dates he was commissioned and no other officers served in the Great War named S.A. Fitch.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 19, 2012, 02:43:07 PM
‘3187 B.S MJR. W.G. SANDYS. R.G.A.’
The Military Medal was instituted on 25 March 1916 to be awarded to non-commissioned officers and other ranks for acts of bravery worthy of especial recognition but not meriting the award of the Distinguished Service Medal and was the equivalent of the Military Cross awarded to officers. The Medal became redundant in 1993 when the award of the Military Cross was extended to all ranks.
 
Battery Sergeant Major William Sandys, M.M., M.S.M. was a regular soldier who enlisted in February 1899.
From 1914 to 1916 he was engaged on what the National Roll of the Great War describes as ‘important home duties’ which seem to have been as part of the batteries defending Portsmouth naval base. In 1916 he was sent to the Western Front and fought on the Somme and at Arras and Cambrai. He was awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery in the field (London Gazette: 20 August 1919) and the Meritorious Service Medal (London Gazette: 18 January 1919) and was also entitled to the British War Medal 1914-1920 and the Inter-Allied Victory Medal 1914-1919. After the War, he returned to Portsmouth and joined 154th Siege Battery.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 20, 2012, 12:19:10 PM
*WW1 BRITISH ARMY MILITARY MEDAL GALLANTRY MEDAL GROUP HONOURABLE ARTILLERY COY*

 599 DVR. H. W. DAVIES, H.A.C.

BRIEFLY, DAVIES WAS AWARDED THE MM ON THE 14/5/19 FOR UNLOADING A BURNING WAGON FULL OF HIGH EXPLOSIVE SHELLS WHILST UNDER TURKISH SHELL FIRE. HE WAS IN B BATTERY, HAC, 19TH BRIGADE, RHA. HE CAME FROM EAST FINCHLEY, LONDON, JOINING THE HAC ON THE 16/12/14, SERVED OVERSEAS WITH B BATTERY HAC 9/4/15 TO 1919. WHILST ISERVING OVERSEAS, HE WAS ONE OF 6 NCO'S WHO WERE URGED TO TAKE UP A COMMISSION, BUT ALL REFUSED IN ORDER TO REMAIN IN THE HONOURABLE ARTILLERY COMPANY. INTERESTINGLY, DAVIES AND B BATTERY IN APRIL 1918 WERE ALSO SERVING ALONGSIDE THE 4TH AUSTRALIAN LIGHT HORSE BRIGADE IN THE CROSSING OF THE JORDAN RIVER
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 22, 2012, 06:02:28 AM

WW1 MILITARY MEDAL F BRAVERY IN THE FIELD.BELIEVED FOR THE MENIN ROAD RIDGE 20-24TH SEPT 1917
AWARDED TO FREDERICK WILLIAM DUGAN GUNNER 645240 . FORMALLY GUNNER 265 R.F.A.TERRRITORIAL FORCE.

1ST WESSEX BRIGADE ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY ATTACHED TO THE 51ST DIVISIONAL AMMUNITION COLUMN.
LONDON GAZETTE14/1/1918
COMES WITH A DETAILED BOUND OLDER OF RESEARCH INCLUDES:

MEDAL INDEX CARD, 1914/15 STAR AND BRITISH WAR MEDAL/VICTORY MEDAL ROLS. LONDON GAZETTE ENTRY, DETAILS ON THE DIVISION, B/M/D DETAILS, 1901 AND 1911 CENSUS DETAILS, FAMILOY TREE DETAILS, BIRTH AND MARRIAGE CERTIFICATES, ( NEWLY ORDERED).

BORN 13/11/1895 PORTSMOUTH HE WAS AN ACCOUNTANCY CLERK. MARRIED 1921 IVY REEVES .
I BELIEVE THAT THERE MAY BE A WRITE UP IN A LOCAL NEWSPAPERS ABOUT HIS AWARD BUT I HAVE BEEN UNABLE TO GET TO THE PORTSMOUTH ARCHIVES TO VERIFY THIS
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 24, 2012, 08:09:59 AM
HERE WE HAVE AN ORIGINAL FULL SIZE WW1 MILITARY MEDAL '' 113449 SJT S.A GOODE K SPEC COY R.E ''. OFFICIAL ALTERATION TO THE INITIAL S. THE MEDAL COMES WITH SOME RESEARCH AND A WRITE UP ON SGT COODE '' H.M KING GEORGE APPROVED THE AWARD OF THE MILITARY MEDAL TO CORPORAL SIDNEY A. GOODE FROM BIRMINGHAM NOTICE OF WHICH WAS GIVEN IN THE LONDON GAZETTE ON 4TH FEBRUARY 1918, FOR BRAVERY IN THE FIELD DURING GAS ATTACKS ON THE GERMAN TRENCHES FROM 1915 ONWARDS IN THE FIRST WORLD WAR. CORP GOODE WAS ASSIGNED TO SPECIAL COMPANY K OF THE SPECIAL BRIGADE OF THE ROYAL ENGINEERS AND LED A TEAM RESPONSIBLE FOR DISCHARGING POISONOUS GAS FROM CANISTERS OF CHLORINE & OTHER GASES FROM BRITISH TRENCHES TOWARDS THE ENEMY FORCES.
 HE WAS PREVIOUSLY WITH THE 14TH ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REG. CORPRAL GOODE ALONG WITH OTHERS IN THE SPECIAL BRIGADE DISEMBARKED IN FRANCE ON 14TH SEPTEMBER 1915. CORPORAL GOODE WAS PROMOTED TO SERGEANT AND THE END OF THE WAR WAS TRANSFERED TO Z RESERVE ON 26TH FEBRUARY 1919. HE WAS ENTITLED TO THE MILITARY MEDAL, 1914-15 STAR, BRITISH WAR MEDAL AND VICTORY MEDAL ''. THE MEDAL COMES WITH RESEARCH AND A ROYAL ENGINEERS CAP BADGE, THIS MEDAL WAS PURCHASED IN 2006 FOR £335, BIDDING STARTS AT 99P....I AM LISTING A COLLECTION OF MEDALS THIS WEEK, I WILL COMBINE POSTAGE. £5.35 U.K OR £7.49 WORLDWIDE FOR A SINGLE MEDAL OR A QUANTITY.PLEASE SEE PHOTOS FOR MORE DETAILS. WE POST WORLDWIDE. SORRY NO BUY IT NOW...
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on January 26, 2012, 07:12:06 AM
A MILITARY MEDAL GROUP TO A SOLDIER KILLED IN ACTION AN FORGOTTEN BY HIS HOME TOWN.

MILITARY MEDAL

CORRECTLY NAMED TO:

L-3941 GNR J GREENHALGH B.165 /BDE R.F.A.

1914/15 STAR AND BRITISH WAR MEDAL

CORRECTLY NAMED TO

L-3941 GNR J GREENHALGH R.F.A. (R.A ON THE BWM)

HE WAS AWRDED THE MILITARY MEDAL FOR EXTINGUISHING A BURNING DUMP OF AMMUNITION WHILST THE BATTERY WAS BEING HEAVILY SHELLED ON THE 28TH AUGUST 1917.

HE WAS KILLED AS A RESULT OF GUN SHOT WOUNDS TO THE ABDOMEN AND DIED ON THE 28TH SEPTEMBER 1917.   BURIED IN DUISANS BRITISH CEMETERY

THE SON OF MR J GREENHALGH OF 3 SMETHURST ST, BOLTON, LANCS.

INCLUDED ARE COPIES OF THE REPORTS OF HIS MILITARY MEDAL AND DEATH INCLUDING PHOTOS FROM THE LOCAL PAPER.

IN 2011 IT CAME TO LIGHT HIS NAME HAD BEEN OMITTED FROM THE BOLTON WAR MEMORIAL AND A CAMPAIGN WAS STARTED TO RECTIFY THE MISTAKE, INCLUDED IS A COPY LETTER FROM DAVID CRAUSBY MP AND SUBSEQUENT ARTICLES REPORTING THAT JOHN GREENHALGH'S NAME WAS TO BE ADDED TO THE BOLTON WAR MEMORIAL.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 29, 2012, 03:16:40 PM
Military Medal ( GV) ( 266561 L/Cpl J Santos 1/7 L’POOL  R.-T.F.)  British War Medal and Victory (4227 Pte J Santos L’POOL R.)
Awarded MM Fighting in FRANCE,
http://www.liverpoolregt.co.uk/Santos_266561.html
 
SANTOS, Lance Corporal, J, Military Medal, 266561. 7th Battalion. King's Liverpool Regiment. 3rd June 1918. Age 35. Son of the late Hypolito and Annie Santos; husband of Grace Mary Santos, of 503, Southdown Rd., Liverpool. I. U. 440. (Liverpool (Anfield) Cemetery - United Kingdom)

Born 22/8/83. Husband of Grace Mary Santos of 7 Olivedale Rd, Mossley Hill later of 503 Smithdown Rd, Liverpool - they had one son Reginald Josph Santos b. 1/1/15. Enlisted Bootle 22/5/15. Aged 31years 9 months at enlistment, address 7 Olivedale Rd, Mossley Hill, occupation joiner, height 5' 7" with good physical development. He has previously served in 4 VB KLR and 7 KLR for 12 years attaining the rank of Col Sgt being voluntarily discharged in March 1912. Appointed unpaid L/Cpl 15/12/16. Reverted to Pte on crossing to France (Folkestone - Boulogne) 24/11/16. Joined 24 Infantry Base Depot (Etaples) 24/11/16. Joined 7 KLR in the Field 13/12/16. Appointed unpaid L/Cpl 15/12/16. Appointed paid L/Cpl 11/7/17. Wounded (gsw l hand - mild) 31/7/17 and admitted to 2/1 Wessex Field Ambulance. Admitted 46 Casualty Clearing Station (Remy Siding) 31/7/17. Admitted 18 General Hospital (Camiers) 1/8/17. Joined 6 Convalescent Depot (Etaples) 4/8/17. Joined 24 Infantry Base Depot (Etaples) 6/8/17. Rejoined Battalion 28/8/17. To 3 Army Gas School 15/10/17. Rejoined Battalion 20/10/17. Granted Class 2 proficiency pay @ 3d per day 22/5/17. Granted Class 1 proficiency pay 1/7/17. Granted leave to UK 19/12/17 to 2/1/18. He fell ill on 6/1/18 complaining of sickness and headache. Awarded the Military Medal gazetted 14/1/18. Admitted 1/3 West Lancs Field Ambulance 20/1/18 (TB of lung). Admitted 12 Stationary Hospital (St Pol) 21/1/18 (phthsis). Transferred to 3 Canadian General Hospital (Etaples). To UK 26/1/18 on the HS Stad Antwerpen and admitted to No 2 Eastern General Hospital, Brighton. Discharged 24/3/18. He served with 'A' Coy. Died 3/6/18. (Soldiers Papers - National Archives)

1901 Census Class: RG13; Piece: 3504; Folio: 30; Page: 5.
Joseph Santos
Occupation joiner's apprentice
Age: 17
Address : 10 Britannia Ave, Wavertree
Estimated birth year: abt 1884
Relation: Brother
Gender: Male
Where born: Liverpool,
Robert B Santos 25, fishmonger's assistant, b. Liverpool
Sarah A Santos 21, b. Liverpool
Mattie Santos 19, b. Liverpool
Polito Santos 13, b. Liverpool

1891 Census Class: RG12; Piece: 2915; Folio 40; Page 10; GSU roll: 6098025.
Joseph Santos
Age: 8
Address 22 Mona St Liverpool
Estimated birth year: abt 1883
Relation: Son
Father's Name: Hypolito Santos, 48, mariner, born Cape De Vere
Mother's Name: Ann Santos, 39, b. Flintshire
Gender: Male
Where born: Liverpool
Robert Bell Santos 16, cab driver, b. Liverpool
Sarah Santos 12, b. Liverpool
Matzine Santos 9, b. Liverpool
Polito Santos 3, b.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 12, 2012, 05:47:01 PM
 very rare British War Medal and Victory Medal Welsh Guards pair, correctly named  in impressed capitals PTE C SENDEY W GDS who was entitled to the Military Medal. The British War Medal and Victory Medal are in fantastic condition and the Victory Medal still has the full gold flash plating - and therefore retains its original colour.

Also included is copy of his service record and medal index card.He was gassed twice.

The pair is mounted on a WW1 medal mounting bar with a jewelers copy name erased Military Medal.

Private Sendey is named in the Welsh Guards History as leading from the front in the Welsh Guards last engagement of the War in November 1918 at Bavai. All those named won the Military Medal, so this must be where Sendey won his. I have done a full write up detailing his civil;ianand military history:-

CHARLES GEORGE SENDEY - WELSH GUARDS

Charles George Sendey was born on 31st July 1892. He attested into the army on 10th December 1915, and was placed into the Army Reserve, to be called upon when required. He was mobilized on 18th September 1916 and was posted to the Welsh Guards, being given the army number 3069.

His description was:- apparent age 26 years 5 months, height 5 feet 7 ¾ inches, chest 36 inches (with 2 ½ inches of expansion). Sendey‘s religion was Wesleyan and his occupation a farmer labourer. His address was 8 Mason Street, Litherland (a suburb of Liverpool). His next of kin was given as his mother, Mrs Harriet Sendey of Dean Prior, Buckfastleigh, Devon.

After over a year spent in England, during which time he trained as a signaller, Sendey embarked from Southampton on 31st January 1917 to join the Welsh Guards. He was part of their 19th draft. He disembarked from Havre on 1st February 1917 and would have been sent to the Guards Division Base Depot to undergo further training. He joined the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards in the field on 20th February 1917.

The 1st Battalion Welsh Guards were part of the 3rd Guards Brigade, together with the 4th Battalion Grenadiers, 2nd Battalion Scots and 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

?

Private Sendey was gassed on 17th October 1917, initially receiving treatment at No 3 Field Ambulance. He was admitted to 6 General Hospital at Rouen on 19th October and was then evacuated to England on 5th November.

He remained in England for nearly five months before embarking from Southampton on 31st March 1918 to re-join the Welsh Guards. He disembarked from Havre on 1st April to become part of the Welsh Guards 32nd draft. He joined the Guards Division Reinforcement Battalion in the field on 6th April, and re-joined the 1st Battalion Welsh Guards in the field the following day, 7th April.

Private Sendey was gassed for a second time on 17th September 1918 and was admitted to No 19 Casualty Clearing Station in Boulogne on the same day. He was admitted to 1 Convalescent Depot, also in Boulogne on 25th September, and then to 10 Convalescent Depot in on 27th September.

After recovering he transferred to the Guards Division Base Depot at Harfleur on 6th October, and re-joined the 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards in the field on 18th October.

Although the war was entering it’s final stage, Sendey was about to take part in the action for which he would be awarded the Military Medal.

The last action of WW1 for the Welsh Guards was the attack on Bavai in the first week of November 1918. Even though so late in the war the Battalion suffered casualties of one officer and ninety three other ranks. Sendey is mentioned by name as one of the men who led the attack.

To quote the Battalion History:-

This engagement near Bavai was entirely L. F. Ellis's and No. 3 Company's fight. At the start from Amfroi- pret, Coleman had advanced, with his company extended, through the hedges dividing the country on the left of the railway. Battye, following Coleman, had attacked Buvignies from the south, and had found but a few of the enemy there. Ellis then arrived, and, forming up his company on the east of the village, advanced in the direction of Prehert Farm. Visibility was extremely bad owing to the fine, misty rain which continued all day. Working through the hedges — the boundaries of the fields in this part of the country were partly wire but mostly hedges — he soon got in touch with the enemy on the railway. Ellis was a little man who indulged at times in quick, Nov. 1918] BAVAI 281 fretful outbursts of temper. All previous conversations and instructions indicated a quick advance, a hustling of the enemy. The railway was not a long way from Buvignies, and when Ellis found the leading platoon of his company checked he went forward to see what waa happening. There was a lot of noise going on from enemy machine guns firing out of the mist in front of him and from Bavai on his left, but at the moment no- thing from the railway, some fifty yards in front of the bank and hedge behind which his platoons were lying. He found a consultation going on as to what should be done, and was informed that the railway cutting was held. Immediately he lost his temper and began to fume. '* Nonsense ! there is no one there,'' said he, and pushing through the hedge, ran across the inter- vening fifty yards, and jumped into the cutting. He found himself in the middle of about thirty Germans. He had nothing but his walking-stick, which he flour- ished. At that moment there was a loud report over his head and a German fell. Another report, then several more in quick succession. L/Cpl. E. Gordon and L/Sergt. W. Jones had, fortunately for Ellis, followed him as soon as they had seen what he was doing, and from the top of the bank were firing at the enemy. Gordon was one of the best shots in the battalion, and Jones, though not so good, could scarcely miss at such close range. The Germans were startled, confused, and ran, but Jones accounted for five and Gordon for six before they reached the protection of an adjacent hedge and the favouring mist. The whole company were now streaming into the cutting, and Ellis was stamping up and down telling them not to bunch. Without giving them breathing- time he led the way over the opposite bank and through the first hedge. Facing him was a long, gentle slope with wire fencing to the fields. Almost at the top of the rise the enemy were entrenched in " slits," and to gain this ground there was a lot of fighting of an exciting character. Ellis had fired his men, and they advanced up the slope in short rushes. A lot of ammunition was 282 THE ADVANCE [Chap. XIX expended, but the casualties were surprisingly few. Ellis personally led a Lewis Gun team, and when the No. 1 was shot through the neck, worked the gun him- self. Powell was killed trying to rush a light machine gun, and at his heels Pte. Hammond, who for a long time had been Humphrey Dene's orderly. L/Cpl. Gordon was shot through the leg, but lay on his back firing over his feet like a Bisley marksman — Gordon's shooting undoubtedly did much to shake the enemy. He was a very cool man, and claims twelve " kills " that day. Pte. Arthur Thomas, too, though wounded in the face, continued firing his Lewis Gun. The enemy were either killed or they ran, and Prehert Farm was reached. Ellis then proceeded to clear the immediate neigh- bourhood of the farm, and quite a game of hide-and-seek went on amongst the small orchards and hedged pad- docks surrounding the place. It could almost be said that the men " enjoyed " this fighting. With Bavai held, the position of the company had to be considered. Coleman, with No. 2 Company, should have been forwarded on Ellis's right, but Coleman was searching for the Grenadiers on his right and waiting for them to advance. The whole original scheme of attack was based on the right of the line keeping forward, whereas the left had shot away well in advance. J. Ellis, who had been sent up with the Prince of Wales's Company, now got in touch with L. F. Ellis (Squifi) and relieved his anxiety as to his Bavai flank. In due course Gwynne Jones reached Coleman, and No. 2 Company advanced on the right. From the farm to the main road the advance was slow — a matter of working steadily from hedge to hedge in face of stiffer resistance. The left flank was fed until only headquarters held the surroundings of Buvignies. In the patrol work to his front and towards Bavai " Squifl " Ellis showed the greatest skill. He had not enough men to risk further adventure, and was ordered to stand fast ; but he marked each enemy post and each retire- ment was known to him at once. He first got in touch with a French civilian on the very outskirts of Bavai THE LAST ACTION. Nov. 1918] BAVAI 283 soon after midnight, and the town Was entered about 2 a.m. the following day. We have mentioned 872 L/Cpl. E. Gordon, 756 L/Sergt. W. M. Jones, and 3,093 Pte. A. Thomas. Others who led were— 1,465 L/Cpl. S. White, Ptes. 3,275 R. F. Charnley, 3,861 G. W. Snell, 624 L/Cpl. A. Raisley, 834 L/Cpl. W. C. Gardener, Ptes. 3,555 I. H. Owen, 974 C. Thomas, and 3,069 C. G. Sendy, and there were many more. Casualties were one officer, ninety-three other ranks.

His Military Medal is Gazetted in The London Gazette 23rd July 1919.

Sendey was granted leave to the UK from 13th February until 27th February 1919. He did not return to Germany and he transferred to the Reserve Battalion on 27th February 1919, and transferred to Class Z of the Army Reserve on 16th October 1919.

Charles Sendey married Agnes Harrison in 1926. Agnes died in Liverpool in 1971, aged approximately 71. Charles died in 1974, also in Liverpool, aged approximately 82.

 
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 25, 2012, 07:42:52 AM
Original full size Victory medal impressed M2-203830 PTE. H. SKILBECK. A.S.C.

Herbert Skilbeck, born in 1883, married to Florence Lettey at Heaton Baptist Chapel, Bradford, living Quarry House, Snainton, South Yorkshire with their young daughter, Florence Jane.

Mobilised 30th August 1916 and posted overseas to Mesopotamia (Iraq) as an Acting Lance Corporal attached to the 14th Light Armoured Motor Battery (L.A.M.B.), Machine Gun Corps (Motors).

Herbert died on 26 May 1919 from a gun shot wound to the abdomen received in action. He was buried in the Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, Iraq.

Five weeks later his Millitary Medal announcement was printed in the London Gazette dated July 3, 1919;

His Majesty the KING has been graciously pleased to approve of the award of the Military Medal for bravery in the Field to the undermentioned Warrant Officers, Non-Commissioned Officers and Men : -
Royal Army Service Corps.
M2/203830 Pte. Skilbeck, H. (Grantham) (MESOPOTAMIA)

Medal in overall good condition but has a blob of verdigreis encrustation on obverse (see pics). Sold with full guarantee of authenticity plus London Gazette announcement and four sheets of pension papers saved as pdf files plus a paperback copy of the book “Armoured Cars in Eden”  written by Kermit Roosevelt M.C., son of American President Theodore Roosevelt, an account of his time with 14th L.A.M.B.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 26, 2012, 08:39:48 AM
Four Medals. Military Medal.15271. Pte S. Pinder. 24/Manc. R. 1914-15 Star.15272. Pte S. Pinder. Manc R. ( Mancherster ).
1914-18. British Silver Medal.1914-19 Victory Medal.
15272. Pte S. Pinder. Manchester Regiment. Citation States:- 15271. Privatw Samuel Pinder, M.M. 24th (Service) Battalion, Manchester Regiment, ( Oldham Pals). A. Company 2 Platoon. Samuel Pinder was born in 1896 and lived with his Mother at 15 Neath Street, Oldham. Before enlisting he was employed as a T00l Fitter. He was wounded on October 22nd 1917, and February 2nd 1918. On October 22nd 1917, The Company to which Pinder belonged was heavily shelled near Dumbarton Lakes and incurred four casualties, including himself. Though badly wounded he picked up a Lance-Corporal who had been severely wounded and carried him out of the shelled area and dressed his wounds. Private Samuel Pinder was a qualified Lewis Gunner. He served for three years and nine months of which three years and two months were in the field. MM. London Gazette 23rd Febuary 1918. The condition of the medals are Very Fine medals mounted on Bar to wear.

Item number: 260989149964
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on April 09, 2012, 08:11:13 AM
WW1 MM AND BAR AND MINIATURE ‘4269 PTE J.R.MURRAY. 8/AUS: INF’

 With Box of issue for bar to MM (damaged) and original ribbon.
James Roy Murray from Victoria, enlisted 7th Aug 1915.
Joined Batt in France 29th July 1916.
WIA 9th May 1917
WIA a second time 31st Aug 1918

Military Medal (Awarded) 'Conspicuous gallantry and resource, resulting in valuable services being rendered.' (East of Ypres 4 October 1917).

Recommendation - 'During the attack on BROODSEINDE RIDGE east of YPRES on 4th October, 1917, Pte. MURRAY did brilliant work in outflanking and rushing an enemy Machine Gun which was doing a lot of damage to our troops on the right flank. He bayoneted two of the Machine Gunners and captured the gun and two remaining men. His action was the means of saving many casualties and greatly facilitated the advance.'

Bar to Military Medal (Altered from Distinguished Conduct Medal) ‘Work at Herleville Wood on 23 August 1918.'

Recommendation – ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty during the attack on Herleville Wood on 23rd August 1918. Through out the advance Corp Murray, did splendid work directing and leading his men , showing fine dash and courage in organising and leading a rush on a German post that was making a stubborn resistance.  He was afterwards placed in charge of a rations party and when returning to the lines was caught in a storm of gas shells. Though knocked down and gassed by the first shells himself, he still maintained control of his party and his prompt action in extending his men and keeping them at hand, not only saved many of them from casualty but was a means of reaching the front lines in tacked, Though suffering from gas and a severe shaking up, he continued on duty, refusing relief until he collapsed from the effects of gas.

Entitled to BWM/Vic, unclear if these were actually received

Fantastic fighting citations , 1 of only 9 MM and bars to 8th Battalion

FOR MORE PHOTOS SEE:

http://www.jagermedals.com/Updates/161111/jm271/jm271%20large.pdf

Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on April 14, 2012, 12:08:49 PM
1914 star trio 4745 Pte R Moir 7/D Gds
Sjt on pair  MM 28614 Sjt R Moir 6/Som L I

He went to F/F with the 7th Dragoon Guards 15/8/1914
transfered to the A V C 16/2/1915
transfered to Somerset Light Infantry
LG for M M 11/2/1919 page 2087
he was from Selby

extract from war diary 6th (service Bn) Somerset Light Infantry
10/9/1918 Wet,Patrol reconnoited wire in front of Railway Cottage,found a hidden belt there.Serjeant Moir sniped one German in Machine Gun post.
Srg Moir went to the reserve 7/2/1919
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on April 15, 2012, 08:17:28 AM
The RARE & HIGHLY DESIRABLE “PASSCHENDAELE 1917" MILITARY CROSS, WAR & VICTORY MEDAL TRIO to a CANADIAN SASKATCHEWAN Regiment LIEUTENANT (Later Captain) LESLIE MARTIN who won this M.C at CREST FARM, PASSCHENDAELE 30th OCTOBER 1917, when he personally stormed a series of fortified shellholes, CAPTURING THE WHOLE GERMAN GARRISON, & later with all other Officers dead or badly wounded, took command of his Company under heavy fire on the final objective. Later appointed Acting CAPTAIN, he was WOUNDED in 1918 & discharged that year.

Consists of MILITARY CROSS (GvR) - Unnamed as awarded, the British War Medal & Victory Medal, both correctly named to CAPT. L. MARTIN.

All on old, silk ribands with the Two Original NAMED medal boxes & brown paper packets.

LESLIE MARTIN of the SASKATCHEWAN REGIMENT Group (28th Bn, 46th Bn, 1st C.M.R).

Leslie was commissioned Lieutenant on 16th June 1917, & served in France & Flanders with the Saskatchewan Regiment, of the famous CANADIAN CORPS. He led his Platoon of 50 men into action for the first time on 26th October 1917 in the Canadian’s first attempt to capture PASSCHENDAELE village. The battlefield was a morass of liquid mud. Attacking uphill against enemy pillboxes, in terrible conditions the assault failed with heavy losses.

The Canadians reorganised, & under pouring rain Leslie Martin & his Company attacked again on 30th OCTOBER. Despite the weather, the mud, they made some progress until a hail of German machine gun fire coming from a series of sandbagged shell holes pinned them down. His London Gazette notice of 28th December 1917, & the Citation of 28th April, for the award of the MILITARY CROSS takes up the story.....

MILITARY CROSS

CANADIAN FORCES

- Lt. Leslie Martin. Infy.

"FOR CONSPICUOUS GALLANTRY & DEVOTION TO DUTY. HE LED HIS MEN WITH GREAT COOLNESS IN THE ATTACK, & WHEN HELD UP BY A SERIES OF FORTIFIED SHELL-HOLES, HE RUSHED FORWARD, CAPTURED THE ENTIRE GARRISON, & ENABLED THE ADVANCE TO CONTINUE.

HE TOOK COMMAND OF HIS COMPANY ON THE FINAL OBJECTIVE WHEN HIS COMPANY COMMANDER BECAME A CASUALTY, & ORGANISED THE CONSOLIDATION UNDER HEAVY FIRE. HE SHOWED SPLENDID COURAGE & LEADERSHIP”.

Lieutenant Martin was appointed Acting Captain at some point in 1918, & appears to have been wounded & discharged that same year, confirmed by his only Officer List entry - December 1917.

This fine group comes which includes copy entries from the London Gazette for M.C notice & Citation, Officer List, Gallantry Awards & Canadian Division details.

In Nearly Extremely Fine Condition.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 02, 2012, 11:50:47 AM
WWI Military Medal and Bar correctly named to 74863 Gnr R.A. Allen  R.F.A. graded nearly extremely fine. With a copy of MIC and London Gazettes, MM announced in LG dated 14 May 1919 and Bar 23 July 1919. MIC to Robert Alexander Allen, entitled to 1914 star and clasp trio and Silver War Badge, first landed in theatre 23 August 1914 with 32nd Bde RFA. LG state C/104 Bde and from Woolwich on both. MM bar is loose on ribbon. SWB roll states enlidted 10/1/14 and discharged form 104 Bde 30/4/19 due to wounds, issued SWB No B195202. With copies of MIC, SWB roll, LGs

 
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on July 01, 2012, 08:14:05 AM
British 1914-18 War Bravery Medal Group

Military Medal, War Medal & Victory Medal

to

Gunner 106076 F.B.Allen. 129 Siege Battery.

Royal Garrison Artillery

A very desirable group of three officially awarded full size medals. They are complete with original ribons and are in a superb, very fine plus condition. The medals are described as follows,

Military Medal - George V type. Silver. 36mm in diameter. Correctly and offiicially impressed on the rim to, "106076. Gnr. F.B.Allen. R.G.A.".

British WWI War Medal - Silver. 36mm diameter. Correctly & officially named to "106076. Gnr. F.B.Allen. R.A.".

British WW1 Victory Medal -  Bronze. 36mm in diameter. Correctly and officially impressed
"106076. Gnr. F.B.Allen. R.A.".

I can confirm that the Military Medal was gazetted in the London Gazette on the 13th of March 1919.

Gunner Allen was a native of Manchester and was also  awarded the War & Victory Medal.

The medals would benefit from further research and study.

A very collectable group in super condition.

Postage from France to the U.K. by Insured airmail with tracking number will be 6.50p




 
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on September 07, 2012, 02:06:01 PM
Military Medal + Pair to
Clayton RFA from Denton Manchester Original Papers

Item number: 280960750153
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on October 15, 2012, 08:24:30 AM
the RAMC have won:3002 MM's: 95 MM's and first bar and 4 MM's and second bars.If this is so then this group is one of only 95.

MEDALS mounted as worn with some contact marks as expected regimental number on BWM  worn  by contact ,Victory medal has edge knock and brusing near regimental number..medals in overall nice condiction.MM is nice

Medals named

Military medal : 30210 SJT W ELDRIDGE 45/ FA RAMC
Reverse of bar engraved     S SJT W ELDRIDGE
1915 star          30210 SJT W ELDRIDGE RAMC

British war and victory medals 30210 W O CL 1 W G ELDRIDGE RAMC

medals mounted as worn in letter pouch...medals come with ORIGINAL WARRANT when he was promoted warrant officer 22.6.1918 and   ORIGINAL certificate of demobilization as a QMS..

William George Eldridge was born in Wendover Buckingham in 1891  the 1911 census shows him as a farm labourer living at Russell farm Wendover Buckinghamshire.He joined the Royal army medical corps 19.8.1914 and served in France with 45 Field Ambulance from 8.7.1915.Rapid promotion followed and by the wars end he had acheived the highest war substantive rank ( Non comm) of  warrant officer class 1 .

He won the military medal at MAMETZ WOOD 9th August 1916....London gazette 21.10.1916

The war diary for that period reveals the deed for which he won the MM

30210 Sergeant W Eldridge has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and devotion to duty on 9th August 1916.In evecuationg  and looking after the casualties during a very heavy bombardment of MAMETZ WOOD and carrying on with the work of receiving gassed men from a dugout after captain Raymond (RAMC) had been wounded and later Captain Hamilton (RAMC) had been gassed.

Awarded a Bar to the Military medal London gazette 18.10.1917 for gallantry during the battle of Pilckem Ridge 31st July 1917  S(staff) SERGEANT W ELDRIDGE (BEXHILL)

The war diary adds:on 30th July 1917 zero hour for the next days attack was announced for 0350.At 0450 stretcher bearers followed 45 infantry brigade into the attack.At 0640 waliking wounded began to arrive back at the forward position the dressing station was at Vlamertinge.Trains were successful in evacuationg the wounded 60 at a time.By0700 the first german prisoners came in and by 0945 the Manin road first aid post was full of wounded,the Potijze first aid post the same.At 1100 lorries arrived to collect the walking wounded at 1110 oc  and forward bearers establishing themselves at Bavaria House at the relay point and stretcher dump where stretcher bearers will take over from the forward bearers.Bavaria House being the most forward point before the attack.At1300 sixty extra stretchers arrived from main Dressing station.At 1730 Captain leslie commanding forward bearers from 45 Filed Ambulance reports he has formed a forward dressing s6tattion 800 yards in formt of bavaria House near Potjze-Zonnebeke road ,coming under fire one of his Segeants killed and three privated wounded.At 1930 reports received that our advancing infantry unsupported on both flanks are beginning to fall back,adavnced stretcher bearers also falling back.At 2030 discovered Captain Leslie and his bearers on the eastern ridge of Frezenberg  Ridge ,by daylight this position would be in full view of the enemy,small parties of infantry falling back.At2230 MO's and bearers returned to Potije,excpet for captain Shepherd(RAMC) and 50 men carrying on at Bavaria House,our infantry having fallen back to the captured second position.he wounded continued to be cleared all night

work continued the following day 1st August our infantry having dug in to defend the captured second objective,every effort being made to contact regimental MO;sFirst Aid post at Menin road and Potijze clear of wounded by midnight at 0730 Captain Warren (RAMC) reported that his first aid post at Belgian Battery Corner had delt with the evacuation  1323 walking wounded

William George Eldridge was transfered to the army reserve 15th February 1919.In 1917 his address was at Bexhill on Sea Sussex

Medals come with full pages of war diary for 31st July 1917..and entry for his MM for Mametz wood,Census and Medal index card.


Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 15, 2013, 09:16:20 AM
  World War One Military Medal for Bravery in the Field named to 26215 PTE. C.F. KINGHORN 14/CAN. INF.
 Charles Frederick Kinghorn was born at Cambray, Ontario in 1897.  He served three years with the Queen's Own Rifles Canadian Militia in Toronto before the war. In August 1914 he volunteered for active service with the First Canadian Contingent.  He attested into the 14th battalion at Valcatier and sailed for France on October 3, 1914.  He went to France with his Battalion in February 1915.  he was reported as missing in the Toronto newspapers at the 2nd Battle of ypres and his brother, Joesph, a Toronto hat maker was reported as wounded.   By the 1st of August 1915 he was back in the front line with the 14th Battalion.
 
In July 1916 he was sent on a Trench Mortar Course and then seconded to the 3rd brigade Trench Mortar Battery.  He was awarded the Military medal for his actions on the 15th of August 1917 at Hill 70. The Military medal comes with a great fighting citation. 
 
On the 3rd of October 1918 he suffered a gun shot wound to the leg.  He was discharged from the CEF at Toronto in March 1919.
 
On the 25th of April 1922 he enlisted in thge Royal Canadian horse artillary at Kingston Ontario.  He went AWOL from the RCHA on October 28th, 1923 and was struck off strength.   

CITATION for MM.  For coolness, resourcefulness and bravery displayed on Aug: 15, 1917.  This Private repeatedly led carrying parties through heavy barrages across no mans land into the captured enemy position.  His bravery and ability as a guide enabled his unit to keep forward a constant supply of ammunition on which the whole success of the unit's operations depended.  His enthusiasm was so great that he repeatedly volunteered for dangerous duties and carried on without sleep until the Battery was relieved.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on March 18, 2013, 12:21:09 PM
World War One Military Medal Group to 57482 Sgt William Minnis / 36th Ulster Division Engineers in near mint condition.
William Minnis was awarded his MM in the London Gazette on the 22nd January 1917, also mentioned on page 334 of Cyril Falls History of the 36th ( Ulster ) Division.

William was a time served riveter working in Harland  and Wolff and working in the yard when the Titanic was being built as a riveter he would have been pulled in for such a major job. There are 41 pages of research from his Medal Index Card to copies of slips for the 1914/15 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.
There is even a slip for his release from the Army dated 13/08/18 for Ship Building.
William was born in Lisburn, Co.Antrim and his address was given as 13 Ribble Street, Belfast.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on April 05, 2013, 08:54:22 AM
A genuine WWI medal pair . The Military Medal for Bravery in The Field inscribed R- 37934 Pte D V Ottaway 13/ K.R.R.C. The British War Medal inscribed R- 37934 Pte D Ottaway K.R.Rif.C. Includes a letter  addressed to Ottaway Q B1 Ward Graylingwell War Hospital Chichester Sussex dated 5th May 1917 regarding the injury sustained in combat and recommending recognition for gallant conduct. Dudley Vigor Ottaway Born 25.4.1892 . Died 4.1.1975.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on May 26, 2013, 08:11:11 AM
WWI Military Medal and Bar correctly named to 74863 Gnr R.A. Allen  R.F.A. graded nearly extremely fine. With a copy of MIC and London Gazettes, MM announced in LG dated 14 May 1919 and Bar 23 July 1919. MIC to Robert Alexander Allen, entitled to 1914 star and clasp trio and Silver War Badge, first landed in theatre 23 August 1914 with 32nd Bde RFA. LG state C/104 Bde and from Woolwich on both. MM bar is loose on ribbon. SWB roll states enlidted 10/1/14 and discharged form 104 Bde 30/4/19 due to wounds, issued SWB No B195202
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 05, 2013, 07:47:13 AM

A WORLD WAR ONE MILITARY MEDAL AND 1914 STAR(WITH MONS BAR), BRITISH WAR MEDAL, AND VICTORY MEDAL TO, 40681 SJT. R.S. HINDLE R.F.A., HIS RANK ON THE STAR IS GUNNER. ALSO COMES WITH HIS LONDON GAZETTE ENTRY ON THE 17th JUNE 1919, THIS SHOWS HIM AS BEING IN THE A / 190th BDE. AND ALSO SHOWS HE WAS FROM LIMERICK.

 WW1 medals awarded to Ernest Walter NORMAN of the 1st Battalion,Royal Warwickshire Regiment who was from Birmingham.
The group is confirmed as his complete entitlement of medals which comprise of GV Military Medal named to 21929 Pte E.W.NORMAN.1/R.WAR.R. and his British War and Victory Medals both named to 1516 PTE E.W.NORMAN.R.WAR.R.

The group comes with research which includes a copy of the MM medal index card confirming that the award was for service in France and the date of the London Gazette entry being 28/01/1918.A copy of the London Gazette entry dated 28/01/1918.A copy of the medal index card confirming entitlement to War and Victory medals only.It also confirms his entitlement to the Silver War Badge (missing from group) and having rejoined in the Labour Corps.A copy of the War and Victory medal roll.A copy of the War Badge roll confirming his War Badge serial number of 421929 which in part was allocated as his service number on his MM (21929).On computer disk there is a copy of the Battalions regimental war diary for the period of relevance and a few other bits such as Census research.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 13, 2013, 05:44:04 PM
World War 1 Military Medal group plus Defense Medal (unnamed) correctly named as follows to Pte A(lbert) E(dward) Hurl

MM - 85449 Pte A.E. Hurl 196 / Coy M.G.C.

BWM - 85449 Pte A.E.Hurl M.G.C.
VM - 85449 Pte A.E. Hurl M.G.C.

Mounted in British Legion 1914-1918 embossed medal case on a bar.

Full Papers available online = 28 pages  - Attestation papers confirm Albert Edward Hurl originally enlisted in the Army Pay Corps No 3320 then transferred to the MGC

Albert Hurl - one of 5 out of 6 brothers who enlisted in the Great War - a native of St Ives, his parents ran the Bell Pub in The Waites St Ives.

See following link: http://www.huntscycles.co.uk/Soldiers/H/William%20Mapperely%20Hurl.htm
The picture is supposed to be of one of his brothers but since uncovering Albert's papers online and seeing his enlistment in the APC it is likely beyond every probability that the picture is of Albert - note the relative was unsure as there was no record of any relative serving with the APC.

The 196th MGC was part of 166 South Lancashire Brigade, 55th West Lancashire Division who were involved in the opening day of Passchendaele and the assault on Pilckem Ridge.

See link: http://www.roll-of-honour.com/Huntingdonshire/gallantrycitationsandawards.html
Note that this refers to an Arthur Hurl of St Ives and the MGC - a typo as there was not a brother called Arthur - Arthur was his Fathers name. The only Hurl brother from St Ives in the MGC was Albert.
Date of award - 31 st July 1917 Pilckem Ridge. Huntingdonshire Post announced the award on 31st August 1917 - further research available from that source.

Award for - "For covering retreat 31-7-17"

MM Gazzetted on 18th October 1917 Supplement 10722
Quote - 85449 Pte A.E.Hurl M.G. Corps (St Ives).

Subsequently Papers show Albert Hurl transferred to what looks like the 276th MGC and was in Basra for approx 7 months then moved on to Poonah before returning home.

A fascinating Passchendale Pilckem ridge MM group with some most interesting social history - further research available online and form Huntingdonshire Post archives.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 18, 2013, 04:59:39 PM
George V issue Military Medal (MM) for bravery in the field awarded to
 SGT 245676  W Evans 12/ Manch R”.
 Medal is complete with ribbon. Some contact marks.
The MM was London Gazette 2nd April 1918.
Item number:200935500533
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on June 25, 2013, 07:18:13 AM
MM ,AND TRIO TO SGT 14277  E.JONES. 24/MANCH.R.
AN IMMENSE ACT OF BRAVERY IN THE FIELD LED TO
PRIVATE JONES BEING PROMOTED TO SERGEANT
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on July 23, 2013, 05:05:01 PM
Memorial Plaque,Cardboard envelope & Memorial Scroll-Manchester Regiment.
Harry Martin (on Plaque) 'Serjt Harry Martin MM Manchester Regt' (as inscribed on scroll).

SGT 7683 H.Martin 2nd Battalion.

Born Salford;Entitled to 1914 Trio;Died of wounds 13/9/1918.

Awarded Military Medal LG 24/1/19 for bravery at Amiens with 32nd Div when 2nd Manchester rushed the 'Tour de Defiance' Pill Box on edge of Square wood 10-11/8/1918.
Scroll illustrated in 'Great War collectors companion' (see second photo).
With 2 photos of Salford war Memorial,and copies of CWGC & SDGW printouts and copies of Medal index card and attestation papers.

 
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on August 09, 2013, 08:34:10 AM
Military Medal GV to Private P Webster 20th (5th City) Battalion Manchester Regiment from Preston, Lancashire who won the MM for gallantry east of Polygon Wood, Passchendaele, when on 1 October 1917 the Germans launched a counter attack, consisting of three waves, particularly strong on the right flank Company. Completely repulsed, the Battalion received the Divisional Commander's congratulations for the 'Gallant way they withstood Bosch counter attacks this morning. Delighted to hear they have proved for themselves the value of their rifles'.

Military Medal GV

PTE,44501  P Webster 20/Manch R

MM London Gazette 17 December 1917
370872029541

The 20th Battalion Manchester Regiment took over the front line east of Polygon Wood on 30 September 1917, relief from 55th Battalion Australian Imperial Forces completed by 2230. At 0530 on 1 October an intense enemy barrage was put down and slackened at 0545. At 0600 the Germans launched a counter attack, this consisted of three waves consisting of approximately 100 soldiers in each wave. The counter attack was particularly strong on the right flank Company ('A' Company) and an SOS was sent up at 0545. As far as the Battalion frontage was concerned the attack was completely repulsed. After the failure of the attack, isolated Germans who had taken shelter in advanced shell holes carried on sniping. The Commanding Officer Lt Colonel D R Turnbull, DSO when going round was killed by a sniper at 0715. Afterwards the Germans sent out their stretcher parties under cover of the Red Cross flag. Enemy artillery fire continued and was accentuated at 1000 and 1130.

At night two patrols went out to patrol the Battalion front with a view to locating the enemy positions, information gained showed the enemy to be holding a line of Pill Boxes 300 to 400 yards in front of our line. The Manchesters were relieved the next day.

The 7th Division Commander sent a message to the Commanding Officer 20th Manchester Regiment dated 1 October 1917 in which he wrote -

'Please congratulate 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers and 20th Manchester Regiment on the gallant way they withstood Bosch counter attacks this morning. Delighted to hear they have proved for themselves the value of their rifles and also that 1/RWF found they could easily get through a Bosch barrage in snake formation'.

The 20th Manchesters later taking part in the battle of Broodseinde 4 to 9 October 1917.

Private Webster is recorded as serving in 'A' Company and is one of 11 men to be awarded the MM for gallantry during October 1917.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on October 13, 2013, 03:45:58 AM
MEDAL GROUP - THE MILITARY MEDAL: 1914-1918 MEDAL; GREAT WAR VICTORY MEDAL

25751 SJT EDWARD EVANS - ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY

along with copies of his service record, census records, London Gazette
his group comprises of THE MILITARY MEDAL, the 1914-18 Medal and Victory Medal, awarded to Sjt Edward Evans RFA along with related paperwork as follows:

Copy of his Medal Card
Copy of 'Military Medal' card

Copy of his service records including Attestation, Postings and Promotions, Military Medal slip, Military History - with handwritten note 'Military Medal awarded for Bravery in the Field', Enlistment and Examination Sheet, Medical Case Sheet (I have also transcribed this), Inside Sheet, another sheet describing his suitability to become an instructor.

Pages from the London Gazette mentioning his Military Medal
Copy of 1901 Census
Copy of 1911 Census
Information on the RFA

 The Military Medal and 1914/18 medal are both engraved to Sjt Evans, the Victory medal is blank so may have been issued/bought to replace the original one.
Edward Evans was born in Whitchurch, Glamorgan and became an electrical engineer. He signed up for service in 1914, and was awarded the Military Medal for 'bravery in the field' in France in 1918, aged 25. The Military Medal was instigated on 25th March 1916. This is an excellent opportunity to buy a researched and documented group of medals and a piece of real history - the people awarded the Military Medal did what they did for their friends and for their King and Country, not for the acclaim and awards.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on November 11, 2013, 02:12:38 PM
WWI Military Medal and Bar correctly named to 74863 Gnr R.A. Allen  R.F.A. graded nearly extremely fine. With a copy of MIC and London Gazettes, MM announced in LG dated 14 May 1919 and Bar 23 July 1919. MIC to Robert Alexander Allen, entitled to 1914 star and clasp trio and Silver War Badge, first landed in theatre 23 August 1914 with 32nd Bde RFA. LG state C/104 Bde and from Woolwich on both. MM bar is loose on ribbon. SWB roll states enlidted 10/1/14 and discharged form 104 Bde 30/4/19 due to wounds, issued SWB No B195202. With copies of MIC, SWB roll, LGs
eBay item number:281204678324

WWI Military Medal and Bar and Victory Medal correctly named to 17610 Gnr F. Tickle  R.G.A. (R.A. on Victory) graded good very fine. With a copy of MIC and London Gazettes, MM announced in LG dated 13 March 1919 and Bar 17 June 1919. MIC to Frederick Tickle, entitled to 1914 star and BWM, first landed in theatre 14 November 1914 with 8th DACP RGA (Divison Artillery Command Post (I Think)). LG state from Sheeldfield on 1 and Newcastle-on-Tyne on the other. MM bar is loose on ribbon with ribbon sewn at top.
eBay item number:281204678316
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 04, 2014, 02:18:59 PM
Military Medal Group Lieut L Henshaw Lancashire Reg Manchester Reg
(Military Cross,)and trio.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 07, 2014, 07:09:02 AM
Display court mounted WW1 British Army Military medal and trio group, awarded to Cecil Willie Wymer, of Banningham, Norfolk and who served primarily in the Territorial Forces during WW1 with the Yorkshire Regiment.

George V bust type Military Medal named in impressed capitals: 220464 PTE. C. W. WYMER. 1/ E. YORK: R.

1915 Star named in impressed capitals: 2931 PTE. C. W. WYMER. YORK: R.

British War Medal and Victory Medal named in impressed capitals: 2931 PTE. C. W. WYMER. YORK: R.

Good condition overall, showing polishing and post war wear.

Research shows that Cecil Wymer was born in Banningham, Norfolk in 1891 to William and Rossana Wymer. He is listed in the 1911 Census as residing in Tuttington, Norfolk, aged 20. He is shown as having enlisted into the Royal Field Artillery (for a period of 21 days only!), on the 28th August 1914 at Northallerton. His service number was 90388. Why he was discharged is anyone's guess, however he then pops up in the Yorkshire Regiment, with service number 2931, with action in France from 9th October 1915, followed by the East Yorkshire Regiment (Regimental number 220464) and again with the Yorkshire Regiment (Regimental number 200739). His M.I.C. also shows him being issued an S.W.B. badge (numbered 4973) possibly for wounds sustained in action.

His Military Medal is gazetted on page 1219 of the London Gazette for the 24th January 1919, for actions on the 29th August 1919. He is shown as serving with the Green Howards, 1/4 Battalion (North Walsham) Territorial Forces, who during this period had been reduced as a result of battle to cadre status and were mid month training new American soldiers and then date from the grand advances east, known as the Battle of Amiens and the Hindenburg Line, which saw links with the Australian Infantry battalions for this massive advanced into Germany. This battle broke the back of the German Army, with General Ludendorff calling this the 'black' day for the German Army. Cecil Wymer is shown as having been discharged. He died in Norfolk, aged 78 in 1969.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 08, 2014, 09:03:01 AM
Military Medal, War and Victory medal group to Gunner Charles Lawrence Royal Field Artillery.
MM awarded in January 1916 for repairing signal wires under heavy fire.

MM: L-9479 Gnr C Lawrence  B.149 / Brigade RFA
War and Victory: L-9479 Gnr C Laurence  RA (incorrect spelling of surname as is common but number correct)
The group comes with four original documents and a copy of the Medal Index Card (see pictures):
1) Certificate of Transfer to the Reserve
2) Military Medalists' Association (with Charles Lawrence's name written in pencil on it)
3) Hand written note detailing when and where and what the MM was awarded for as well as unit information
4) Leaving the army letter from commanding officer to Gnr Lawrence
5) MIC (Laurence not Lawrence but correct number) confirming MM, War and Victory and also showing entitlement to 1914-15 star
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 10, 2014, 07:30:38 AM
Military Medal GV
P-963 SJT E S Tower 16/Rif Bde

With copy Medal Index Card, London Gazette entries and headers for MM and 1911 census details.

Edward Sydney Tower was born in St Pancras, London in 1880, he appears on the 1911 census as a 30 year old Traveler's Coachman, with his own business (recorded as an employer) residing with his wife Annie Louisa and 5 children at 7 Seabrooke Place, Clerkenwell, London, his first names are erroneously recorded as Sydney Edward. Tower enlisted into the 16th (Service) Battalion Rifle Brigade (St Pancras) 26 May 1915 aged almost 35 years. The 16th Battalion were raised in the Borough of St Pancras 2 April 1915 by the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee and were taken over by the War Office 19 July 1915.

The 16th Battalion landed in France in March 1916 and formed part of 117th Brigade, 39th Division. Tower was awarded the Military Medal London Gazette 2 November 1917, an award for the Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, Passchendaele 20 to 25 September 1917. At 0540 on 20 September 1917 the 117th Brigade assaulted with 17th Battalion Sherwood Foresters 16th Battalion Sherwood Foresters and 16th Battalion Rifle Brigade with 17th Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps in Reserve between Shrewsbury Forest and Bulgar Wood SE of the Menin Road. On the right the Foresters pushed on to the western edge of Bulgar Wood, tacking a number of Blockhouses on the way to the Red Line. The Rifle Brigade came under fire almost immediately from Blockhouses in the 41st Division area, they took two of them and pushed on to take the Red Line. At 0700 the advance continued and the Blue line captured. German counter attacks were made at 1730, 1900 and 2100 but all were broken up by Artillery and small arms fire.

P-649 Sergeant William Francis Burman 16th Battalion Rifle Brigade received the Victoria Cross for this action London Gazette 26 November 1917

Edward Sydney Tower was discharged 20 March 1918 no longer fit for Military service. His age is recorded on discharge as 35 years and 5 months, he was at least 38 years old, he died in St Pancras in March 1939.
Title: Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
Post by: tonyrod on February 13, 2014, 07:57:15 AM
Superb Great War (WW1) Double Gallantry Distinguished Conduct Medal (DCM) Military Medal (MM) Group to 18395 Gunner Fred Stopford Royal Field Artillery. Fred Stopford was born in 1896 and came from Bury Lancashire England, He joined the Royal Field Artillery and went to France on the 18th July 1915. He sereved on the Somme in 1916 and was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for Gallantry (London Gazette 13th February 1917). National Archives document WO 391/5 (Awards of Distinguished Conduct Medals) shows the award was for The Somme 24th June 1916-7th July 1916 which covers the Disasterious 1st Day Somme 1st July 1916. The Citation States:

" 18395 Gnr F. Stopford R.F.A. For Conspicuous Gallantry and Devotion to Duty. He reparied wire under heavy fire. Later although Wounded, continued to carry out his work until Wounded again."

Major General Tom Bridges Commanding 19th (Western Divsion) 27th July 1917 wrote

"This is to certify that No 18395 Gunner F. Stopford 6/87th Bn Brigade RHC Regiment performed the following Act of Gallantry on 27th June - 6th August 1916 at the Somme.

He was deeply employed in replacing telephone wires often under Heavy Shell Fire which he faced with complete indifference to his personal safety. Hw was wounded on the night of the 20th July by a shel Splinter whilst building an Observation Post but made no metion of the mater. On the 21st July he was again wounded by a Gunshot Splinter on the arm but remained at work until it was finished"

(the above appears to be from a Gallantry Card which no longer exsists but the details were copied - card possibly retained by the family when medals sold)

On the 28th September 1917 Gunner Stopford was again decorated with the Award of the Military Medal again for Gallantry on the Somme.

The Medal Index Card shows Fred Stopford was discharged to Z Reserve on the 3rd April 1919.

Naming of Medals:

DCM Impressed:  18395 GNR: F. STOPFORD A/87. BDE: R.F.A

MM Impressed:  18395 GNR: F. STOPFORD. HQ. 33/BDE. R.F.A.

1914-15 Star:  Engarved: 18395 NGR: F. STOPFORD R.F.A.

(Possible Type 3 Naming or Late Issue / Renamed) Spacing Type Face & Layout all Correct but for sake of arguments please treat as re-named
British War Medal & Victory Medal: Both Impressed:  18395 GNR. F. STOPFORD R.A.