Author Topic: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland  (Read 3447 times)

Offline eleri

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2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« on: August 16, 2017, 11:24:05 PM »
Hi. I am new to this forum so I hope I am correct in messaging like this.   

I am the Granddaughter of Edward Fox Dyke Acland discussed a couple of years ago by Charlie and Philip G. in the 14th page of the "Transfers of Manchester Regiment Officers to RFC/RAF" conversation.

http://themanchesters.org/forum/index.php?topic=7726.msg56621#msg56621

 He was a Balloon Officer in the 16th balloon coy during WW1. I have searched but have been unable to find any more about the Balloon officers and wondered if anyone had any more information. Indeed it would be great to know anything about grandpa's military/Air force career, as although he did not pass away until I was 18 he never spoke about the war or his experiences - unsurprisingly I guess. I have a few bits of his from his military career (a camp bed and a blue ensign for instance!) I know he was in the Air Force during the second world war but believe he was not a pilot - unlike his brother Wilfred Reginald Dyke Acland.  I'm not sure why he had an ensign except that his father was a very senior Naval officer.

Any information would be gratefully received  :)

Attached is a photo of him I would guess during WW2.

Many thanks

Offline rafboy

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #1 on: August 17, 2017, 11:51:43 AM »
Welcome to the Forum Eleri

The "O" ring on his uniform is for an Observer see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_observer

Re the rosette on the medal on the left:
Silver rosette used on ribbon bars represents the award of a bar to a decoration, or service in a specified zone of the area of operations when used on a campaign medal. They are worn when the ribbon only is worn. For selected campaign medals, they are also worn on the riband of the campaign medal (when worn with full or miniature medals) to indicate service in a specified zone. Simply put it means he served in the same area the medal was awarded for twice.

Have you got his Service Records?  If not this may help: http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-with-your-research/research-guides/royal-air-force-personnel/

Cliff
« Last Edit: August 17, 2017, 12:12:43 PM by rafboy »
Cliff P Son of 3525679 Sgt Arthur Phillips 1st Bn Manchester Regiment and RAPC

Offline eleri

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #2 on: August 17, 2017, 12:24:22 PM »
Thank you for the reply Cliff.

So would the Air Observer mean that this was a photograph from when he was a balloon observer do you think? He was born in 1892 so that would make him in his 20s. His experiences make him look much older which is why i thought it was from WW2.
Thank you for the link that is helpful.

Yes I have his service record but it seems quite brief and only for the first world war, most of it I don't understand either! Would there be a second one for the second world war? I thought that his record would be all together.

I am finding this much harder than searching the record of my Great great Aunt who was with the Anzac Nurses. The Australians had it all online.

Eleri

Offline charlie

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #3 on: August 17, 2017, 01:40:17 PM »
Hello Eleri,
Further to Cliff's post, the medal ribbons your Grandfather is wearing are for the 1914 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal. The rosette in this case indicates that your Grandfather served, at some point, within range of the enemy's mobile artillery between his arrival in France on 18.09.1914 and 22.11.1914 and is therefore entitled, when wearing the medals, to wear a clasp on his 1914 Star. The clasp is inscribed "5th AUG - 22nd NOV 1914".

The photo that you have posted is of WW2 vintage, even though he was probably no longer employed as an Observer, he was entitled to continue wearing the Brevet.

His RAF service records can be applied for using this link.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/request-records-of-deceased-service-personnel

If you are having difficulty understanding his army service record please feel free to post what you require help with, I'm sure one of us will have the answer.

Charlie

Edit - Commissioned as Pilot Officer in the Administrative and Special Duties Branch RAF 16.05.1939
         Promoted Flying Officer 09.09.1939
         Relinquished Commission 10.02.1954, retaining the rank of Squadron Leader
« Last Edit: August 17, 2017, 02:16:18 PM by charlie »

Online PhilipG

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #4 on: August 17, 2017, 01:43:16 PM »
Eleri,

In connection with the brevet on the officer's RAF uniform may I quote the following:  "After 100 hours operational flying RFC/RAF kite-ballon observers became entitled to wear their brevet, the observer's half-wing".  I would think that this entitlement would prompt your relative to wear his Observer brevet on his WW2 uniform.  In WW2, the display of such a brevet became highly regarded and there were many who were reluctant, later in the war, to be compelled to replace it with the more specialist brevet embracing the letter "N", signifying the qualification of Navigator.   PhilipG.

Online PhilipG

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #5 on: August 17, 2017, 06:59:53 PM »
Your edit, Charlie.        Re the date 16.5.1939.   Things were not looking very good at that time. e.g Military Training Act- Conscription for 20/22 olds etc.  May I make suggestion?  I wonder if this officer's services were called upon in connection with the Balloon Barrage whose balloons were very similar to those kite-balloons of the Great War?   PhilipG.

Offline eleri

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2017, 08:22:26 PM »
Thank you so much everyone.  :)
This is great.
I will request his RAF record now and have a look. If I can't decipher it I will definitely ask.
 :) :)

Many thanks
Eleri

Offline charlie

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #7 on: August 17, 2017, 09:52:11 PM »
Philip,
I think your suggestion is a very real possibility. For the RAF to accept a 47/48 year old in what was still peacetime (just) I would have thought to be unusual. He must have possessed some specialist skill that was urgently needed. I hadn't realised that there was a seperate Balloon Command.

Charlie

Online PhilipG

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2017, 11:08:58 AM »
Eleri,

Re your Blue Ensign.   I note that it can be hoisted by British registered yachts belonging to certain yacht clubs.  e.g. Royal Naval Club.  Does that help?   PhilipG.

Offline rafboy

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #9 on: August 18, 2017, 12:38:45 PM »
Thanks Charlie and Philip for filling in my limited reply.

Eleri do you mean a Blue Ensign like one of these: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Ensign If so which one?
Or the RAF Ensign which is also blue https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Air_Force_Ensign

Cliff
Cliff P Son of 3525679 Sgt Arthur Phillips 1st Bn Manchester Regiment and RAPC

Offline eleri

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #10 on: August 18, 2017, 04:36:04 PM »
Hi Cliff, Charlie and Phillip

I do not know that Grandpa ever sailed as such, Phillip,  or had a yacht but I will ask my Aunt, she may know/remember.

He clearly enjoyed traveling by sea!! - see the first attachment.   ;D

Looking at the links you sent for the flag Cliff, it is the "Modern blue ensign of the United Kingdom".

I'm not sure if they were all small but this one is about 33" x 171/2" on a wooden stick and rather moth eaten now.  :(

I have attached his first world war record as held in Kew.

I can see that he was in the balloon coy in Jan 1918, made an officer on 17/01/18 and possibly changed to a different balloon coy in the November - at least I think that is it.
He was also transferred from the BEF (but I'm not sure what HE [is it HE?] stands for) in 1919, and then he left the military. Is that right?
There is nothing prior to this except that he had a knowledge of French and a recommendation for the 1914 star.

Charlie, might the star and clasp you were telling me about earlier relate to the battle in Ypres do you think? Although I guess there was so much going on it is hard to say.

I have prepared the paperwork and am planning on sending off for his RAF record for the second World War.

I'm very grateful to you for your help in understanding all this.

Many thanks
Eleri

« Last Edit: August 19, 2017, 11:29:56 AM by rafboy »

Offline charlie

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #11 on: August 18, 2017, 04:47:39 PM »
Hello Eleri,
His WW1 service record has failed to attach.

What is known as First Ypres was series of battles fought by the BEF between mid October and the end of November 1914.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Battle_of_Ypres

As your Grandfather was with the BEF in France at this time it is reasonable to assume he was involved in some way.

Charlie

Offline eleri

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #12 on: August 18, 2017, 04:53:40 PM »
Yes Charlie.

Sorry.
I don't know what the problem is but I can't attach it and have tried in several forms. It tells me I am too slow!
I am going to blame BT as I live in the sticks and the internet can be temperamental, added to that we have storms currently. I'll try again later.

Offline charlie

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #13 on: August 18, 2017, 04:59:50 PM »
There is a 1Mb limit for attachments. PM sent.
Charlie

Offline eleri

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Re: 2nd Lt. Edward Fox Dyke Acland
« Reply #14 on: August 18, 2017, 05:07:19 PM »
I don't think it will be that much.
I'm just trying my phone. Fingers crossed.