Author Topic: Op Matador 1953  (Read 618 times)

Offline timberman

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Op Matador 1953
« on: December 03, 2017, 12:28:36 PM »
While at the archives the other week we got a file by accident
(we did have a few of these) although it had nothing to do with
the 2nd Bn in WW1 it did make interesting reading,

It was a diary titled OP. Matador Diary 22nd Jun  to 3rd July 1953,
there were also two maps.
It gives a day by day account of the operations carried out by the
different coy's. Sadly there are no names given.

Just wondered if anyone can recall this operation.

Thanks

Timberman


« Last Edit: December 03, 2017, 12:32:48 PM by timberman »

Offline artyhughes

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2017, 07:02:40 PM »
Hi Timberman

OP Matador and the diary dates I"m sure must relate to the 1st Bn and their operations in Malaya 1951/1954,I'm sure Bob Bonner or George Swetman might know the answer,Regards,Roy

Offline timberman

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2017, 08:37:28 PM »
Thanks Roy

Both of the maps relate to an area around Temerloh.

Timberman

Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2017, 04:34:39 PM »
Operation Matador gets a good mention in my history 'Jungle Bashers'. It was one of those enormous operations which we didn't really like.  In addition to the Manchesters  there were 2/7th  and 2/10th Gurkhas, 3rd King's African Rifles and 22nd SAS plus Police Jungle Squads.  From our point of view there were far too many people bashing through the jungle - we much preferred small dedicated patrols.The operation lasted twelve days of living in the jungle and after the first three days Captain Bill Thorp and C Company discovered two clearings where terrorists had been growing vegetables. Bill, accompanied by an Iban trracker called Senggalang  encountered a terrorist gathering vegetables. The terrorist disappeared into the jungle followed by Senggallang who found, wounded and captured him.

Matador was successful and a total of fourteen terrorists were killed and four surrendered. Of these  the battalion killed three, one to C Company and two to 10 Platoon D Company.
Robert

Offline timberman

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2017, 08:37:52 PM »
Thank you Robert

If anyone get a chance to go to the archives at the library
in Ashton under Lyne the ladies there are very helpful and
it's well worth the visit.

Timberman

Offline george.theshed197

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #5 on: January 15, 2018, 10:05:44 AM »
DONE

Offline autgoc

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2018, 03:59:58 PM »
Hi Apai Tuai George et All,
Warmest regards, albeit a little late might I still wish everyone a Blessed 2018!

I thought I'd like to share with you my little adventure a day after Boxing Day 2017. You see, whilst visiting my father-in-law, who lives in Lytham of Lytham St Annes, over the Christmas hols. I decided to make a dedicated trip to IMW North, Manchester. What an impressive building it is too. But I was most disappointed when I came to the Commonwealth section of the exhibitions. The Asia region was most shocking. One was given the distinct impression that only India mattered.
Thinking of precious young lives lost in all the other Asian countries during numerous bitter struggles against the communists just left a sour taste in my mouth. I walked away more than a little emotional, mostly out of anger at what I had come across.

I regret I had not the leisure of time to venture to the Ashton-under-Lyne Museum as I had to scoot off back to Scotland the very next day. But I have just visited the Manchester Regiment Museum website and noticed that it is shut due to some constructions/ renovations of its surrounding areas. Does anyone know when it will be back open to the public?

I hope this short message of mine finds everyone in good health.


Warmest regards,
Indu Sarawak Magdelene xoxo
« Last Edit: January 22, 2018, 10:15:59 AM by autgoc »

Offline timberman

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2018, 10:41:06 PM »
Hi autgoc

If you follow this link it explains what is happening to the Museum.

http://themanchesters.org/forum/index.php?PHPSESSID=158257534425a77dab61325d005dd59b&topic=8468.0

Also anyone reading this please take a  Survey on the future of Manchester Regiment Museum

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/RegimentMuseumSurvey

Thanks
Timberman

Offline autgoc

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2018, 09:36:19 AM »
Hi Timberman,

Thank you for this invaluable link.


Warm regards,
Magdelene x

Offline autgoc

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #9 on: January 22, 2018, 02:51:17 PM »
My dearest Apai Tuai George et All,

I once made a promise to a Malayan Emergency Veteran I would try my level best to get their story published in a UK tabloid.
In for a penny in for a pound? Well, below is a letter I had written and sent off to the Editor of The Daily Telegraph.
Fingers crossed it hits some sort of nerves with them and see the light of day in the letters column.
One wonders the criteria letters must meet to get published!
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lest We Forget
Sir,
My husband and I recently took our 9-year-old daughter on a dedicated educational trip to the IWM North, Manchester. We did so whilst we holidayed in Lancashire visiting my father-in-law who is in his 100th year. What an impressive building the IWM North is too. But I was most disappointed with what greeted me at The Empire and Commonwealth section. The Asia region was most shocking.
When I read where it said, “Rubber from Malaya (Malaysia) was used to make tyres and dinghies,” I could not help but wonder why there was not more information. My thoughts went directly to post WWII National Service young lads sent to the depths of hostile tropical rainforests to fight Communist Terrorists (CTs) who terrorised and murdered British rubber planters alongside innocent local civilians (Malayan Emergency 1948 – 1960); the same again in the fatal freezing conditions of the Korean War (1950 – 1953) to name just a few. Thinking of all these precious young lives lost in Asian countries (a few too many lying in unmarked graves on foreign soil) during numerous bitter struggles against the communists just left a sour taste in my mouth. I walked away more than a little emotional. The entire experience left me somewhat frayed. One got the distinct impression that only India mattered.

-- Magdelene De Rozario
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Offline rizalbob

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #10 on: April 30, 2018, 11:36:37 PM »
Robert you mentioned an Iban Tracker by the name of Senggalang anak Uyang. I met him in Kapit , Sarawak a few years ago. He is still healthy. He retired a WO2 in the 1st Malaysian Rangers. He was involved in exhuming the graves of the Iban Trackers and Sarawak Rangers KIA and buried in Malaya in 2011.

Rizal

Operation Matador gets a good mention in my history 'Jungle Bashers'. It was one of those enormous operations which we didn't really like.  In addition to the Manchesters  there were 2/7th  and 2/10th Gurkhas, 3rd King's African Rifles and 22nd SAS plus Police Jungle Squads.  From our point of view there were far too many people bashing through the jungle - we much preferred small dedicated patrols.The operation lasted twelve days of living in the jungle and after the first three days Captain Bill Thorp and C Company discovered two clearings where terrorists had been growing vegetables. Bill, accompanied by an Iban trracker called Senggalang  encountered a terrorist gathering vegetables. The terrorist disappeared into the jungle followed by Senggallang who found, wounded and captured him.

Matador was successful and a total of fourteen terrorists were killed and four surrendered. Of these  the battalion killed three, one to C Company and two to 10 Platoon D Company.

Offline rizalbob

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #11 on: May 01, 2018, 11:48:15 PM »
This was Tracker Singgalang ak Uyang.


Offline rizalbob

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2018, 11:50:22 PM »
Singgalang Uyang today.


Offline george.theshed197

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #13 on: May 02, 2018, 10:51:05 AM »
Looking  at Senggalong he appears to be in Better shape than yours trully ((( - ))) ) (however I am still around !!!).

Give him my regards.

George









Offline rizalbob

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Re: Op Matador 1953
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2018, 02:22:08 AM »
Roger, will do.

He stays in Kapit


Rizal