Author Topic: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign  (Read 11196 times)

Offline charlie

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2016, 02:14:37 PM »
i was using google maps.

but it lacks the detail, and the historic names may be missing plus the trench names are missing.

i was looking of the itiniery info to condense on to one map.


If you are serious about it invest in map overlay software, then you will be able to superimpose detail from a trench map (if one exists) onto a modern day map.

Charlie

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #31 on: September 18, 2016, 02:50:20 PM »
         The 22nd Manchesters at the Battle of Vittorio Veneto

In September 1918 the decision was taken to reduce infantry brigades to 3 battalions.  Thus, on the 12th September, the 20th and 21st Manchesters departed for France, leaving as far as the Manchester Regiment was involved, just the 22nd battalion which was part of the 91st Brigade.   However, it would seem that the Divisional Pioneers, namely the 24th Manchesters were to remain in Italy also.

The 22nd Manchesters moved from Treviso to Moserada on the 23rd October 1918 on the right bank of the River Piave in the region of the Island of Papadopoli, a landmark located in the river and which was successfully bridged.  Orders were given that the attack over the Island would commence on the 27th October, with the 22nd Manchesters forming the front line of the 91st Brigade.

In the early hours of the 27th October, the 22nd Manchesters moved across Papadopoli Island coming under strong fire from the Austrians, but nevertheless carried on, taking many prisoners and enemy guns.   The Austrians attempted a counter-attack on the following day, but were repulsed.  The battalion was called forward again on the 29th October to cover the 91st Brigade's flanks and in doing so captured a portion of the bank of the River Monticano.  This would appear to be the last action in which the battalion took part, for thereafter, they moved into billets in various places e.g.Brognoligo.   The total number of All Ranks casualties suffered by the battalion in the recent operations numbered 248.

The records inform us that on the 23rd December the first draft left for England to commence demobilisation procedures.  In due course, the 22nd Manchesters joined the Italian Army of Occupation at Imst, in April 1919 leaving for Taranto on passage for Egypt.  PhilipG.

Offline themonsstar

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #32 on: September 19, 2016, 04:13:31 PM »
Here are some bits on the Italy war

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #33 on: September 21, 2016, 11:26:04 AM »
                             Tezze British Cemetery

There are nineteen men of the 22nd Manchesters buried in this cemetery and one, a 2nd Lieutenant John Edward Entwistle of the 24th battalion.  It would appear that they were killed during the Vittorio Veneto battle.  One of the casualties incurred was in respect of operations over the Papadopoli Island.  Lt. Entwistle was killed there on the 24th October 1918 having only joined the battalion on the 15th October.

I give below the names of a few who are buried in the cemetery:-

2nd Lt. Wm. Gray McEwan, Captain George Hugh Richardson MC, 43568 Signaller Joseph Hudson, and 43587 Corporal A.Bannister.

PhilipG.

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #34 on: September 22, 2016, 10:24:14 AM »
                          Cavalletto British Cemetery

This cemetery which lies 12 kilometres south of Asiago, contains the graves of 100 British soldiers of various regiments who fell during the Italian campaign.   Only 4 of these soldiers served with the Manchester Regiment.   They are:-     

19894 Sergeant Frederick Pattison Bull DCM.    21st Manchesters. Kia 18.7.18
This soldier's name is included in the Book of Honour - 21st Mcrs.
 "E" Coy. Platoon XVlll.

21374 Pte Ernest Jones.   22nd Manchesters  Kia 6.7.18
This soldier's name is recorded in the Book of Honour - 22nd Manchesters
"D" Coy. Platoon XVl.

28345 Pte Harold Carden.  22nd Manchesters Kia 26.6.18

34636 Pte Thomas Fitton.  22nd Manchesters Kia 3.7.18.

The next of kin of Sgt. Bull resided in Urmston, those of Pte Jones in Oldham, those of Pte Carden in Prestwich & those of Pte Fitton in Oldham.

PhilipG.

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #35 on: September 24, 2016, 01:06:54 PM »
                             Granezza British Cemetery

This cemetery is situated some 9 kilometres from Asiago and contains the graves of 139 soldiers who fell during the Italian campaign, including 8 men of the 21st Manchesters.   A high proportion of the burials relate to the Battle of Asiago (15th/16th June 1918) during which the 48th and 23rd Divisions were attacked by the Austrians.  The enemy made some inroads into the British lines, but were forced to retreat the following day. (Captain Edward Harold Brittain MC of the Sherwood Foresters, brother of Vera Brittain, was one of those killed in that action and is buried in this cemetery).

It was not clear what part the 21st Manchesters played in this battle, but from research, it appears that the 7th Division of which the 21st Manchesters was a part, had two artillery brigades on the plateau and the battalion was sent to work under these units.  In doing so, 8 men were killed in action on the 15th June 1918.  Their names are given below:-

55233  Pte A.Etchells (formerly 112954 Tank Corps).
251733 L/Cpl Joseph Hartley.

352415 L/Cpl Alfred Jones (formerly 11414 Border Regt.).
15448 Pte William Andrew Knowles.
203269 Pte Walter Proctor.
38137  Pte Frederick Wilding.
54630  Pte Robert Wolstenholme (formerly 205459 Lancs. Fus.).
245476 Pte William Woodthorpe (formerly 204020 York & Lancs.).


PhilipG.


Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #36 on: September 25, 2016, 11:41:23 AM »
Extract from The 21st Battalion published history:

'The battalion left Centrale by lorry on 10th June, to take up work on heavy artillery positions on the Plateau. The destination was reached about 2am on  the 11th and platoons were attached to the various battery groups  for work.  This continued until the 15th.  In the early hours of that morning an enemy attack was launched on a very wide front.  All positions occupied by the battalion were affected.  The various platoons rendered valuable assistance in the handling of guns in the absence of the regular gunners, who had been evacuated through sickness.  At 4.55 am orders were received for the battalion to withdraw to the vicinity of Monte Caveletto.  The casualties in this operation were 8 men killed and 19 wounded.  In the evening the battalion was ordered to leave for Monte Pau where defensive positions were taken over.'
Robert

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #37 on: September 25, 2016, 01:31:43 PM »
Robert,

Many thanks for that information. PhilipG.

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #38 on: September 26, 2016, 10:59:32 AM »
              The Battle of Asiago, the Montello Sector & the RAF

The Battle of Asiago began at the same time as the Battle of the River Piave (Montello Sector), that is on the 15th June 1918.  There is reference in the Official History to the valuable part played by the Royal Air Force in both battles in stemming the attacks by the Austrian forces.  Whilst the Asiago battle involved British troops, the conflict in the Montello sector east of Asiago was an attack by the enemy on the Italian Army's front.

In the case of the Asiago sector on that day, No.34 Squadron operating with RE8 type aircraft did some useful work in laying down artillery fire against the attacking Austrian infantry.  Sopwith Camel aircraft of No. 45 Squadron were similarly employed in "strafing" the lines of enemy troops coming into battle.   However, the weather in the Asiago region became misty and low clouds hampered the RAF crews in their work.   Accordingly, orders were given for their transfer to the Montello Sector where the Austrians were making incursions into the Italian's lines.   Among the squadrons involved were No. 45 and No. 66, both operating with Sopwith Camel aircraft.

The Official History indicates the success these squadrons had in destroying ferry pontoons and bridges on the River Piave.  It goes on to say that "this air success................wrecked the Austrians' hopes."   It continues, "that the British airmen caught a mass of Austrian troops in boats on the River Piave and bombed and machine-gunned them".   There can be no doubt that the RAF made a major contribution to the subsequent withdrawal by the Austrians across the Piave on the 23rd June, leading to the ultimate victory of the Italian Army.     PhilipG.

Offline woodfox

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #39 on: September 27, 2016, 06:02:25 PM »
http://themanchesters.org/forum/index.php?topic=9019.0
for find some places of asiago plateau where the english soldiers fought look at this my topic

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #40 on: September 27, 2016, 08:01:47 PM »
Woodfox,

Thank you. I have now purchased a book in which there are some photographs of the area in which you live.  It certainly looks an attractive place with its mountains and forests.   PhilipG.

Offline woodfox

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #41 on: September 29, 2016, 05:03:58 PM »
yes very beautiful places

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #42 on: October 13, 2016, 11:21:56 AM »
        Giavera British Cemetery, Arcade.

This cemetery is located 1Km from the village on the Hill Montello.  There are about 400 or so graves in the cemetery, but of this number only 15 burials relate to the Manchester Regt.   Two relate to deaths which took place during the Battle of Vittorio Veneto on the 27th October 1918.   They are:-

34119 Pte Herbert Broadbent.  22nd Mcrs. Kia 27.10.18.  NOK resided in Oldham.
78111 Pte Cecil W. Brooks                     do.                     Age 19.

During subsequent pursuit of the enemy, I note that 26402 L/Sgt Robert James Brown (22nd Mcrs.) died of wounds on the 30th October 1918.  His next of kin were domiciled in Reddish, Stockport.     PhilipG.

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #43 on: October 30, 2016, 11:45:23 AM »
                         Staglieno Cemetery Genoa

This cemetery in Genoa was in the area of No's 38 and 51 Stationary Hospitals and No. 11 General Hospital.   An examination of the cemetery records indicates the following burials relating to the Manchester Regt. (20th, 21st, 22nd, & 24th Battalions.):

19014  Pte Ernest Travis   Died  10.2.18         20th Bn.
Captain N.L.Jennison MC   Died  30.10.18       20th Bn.
203793 Pte F.Fletcher       Died   19.4.18        21st  Bn.
20726   Pte H.Stephens    Died     5.7.18        22nd Bn.
27032   Pte W.H.Barker    DOW    8.11.18       22nd Bn.
14401   Pte E.Hartley       Died    10.11.18      24th Bn.
55507   Pte T. Peatman    Died    31.10.18      24th Bn.

I note that Pte Ernest Travis is recorded in "Soldiers Died" as "d. F & F".

PhilipG.
       

 

Offline PhilipG

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Re: The Manchester Regiment & The Italian Campaign
« Reply #44 on: November 15, 2016, 10:23:26 AM »
As previously mentioned, the 20th and 21st Manchesters were ordered back to France on the 12th September 1918.  This involved the handing in to Army stores of the battalions' sun helmets and drill uniforms and the provision of service dress.   The journey back to France apparently followed a route via Vincenza, Verona, Milan, Turin and thence into France, finally ending at Amiens and later Abbeville.

I list below the locations of the two "City" battalions at the end of hostilities, together with those of the 2nd and 12th Manchesters.  In this connection, it was interesting to note the involvement in the British battle plans in respect of Le Cateau during the "Advance to Victory", this town becoming well known to the four Manchester battalions during the closing stages of the Great War.  In the case of the 2nd Manchesters, of course, at its opening stages, too.

         11th November 1918

20th  battalion      :       Landrecies
21st  battalion      :           do.
12th  battalion     :       Beaufort, south of Maubeuge
 2nd  battalion     :       South of Landrecies

This thread commenced with a reference to the Regiment's Battle Honours, including that of "Italy 1917-1918".  The records state that a total of 33 regiments bore this particular Battle Honour, which must be an indication of the great support the British Army gave to the Italian forces during that period.

PhilipG.