Author Topic: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment  (Read 17452 times)

Offline timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #465 on: August 04, 2018, 01:46:06 PM »
PLEASE NOTE
All of the information on this thread is taken from different sources most are copyright of groups or individuals, I have checked the use of sections on all the sites. I understand that if they are being used for non profit or non commercial use it is OK to put them on our site.
Please bear this in mind if you use any of the information on this thread.
Thank-you

If anything does infringe copyright let me know and I will gladly remove it.

I now have written permission to reproduce alot of the articles on this forum. The rest are covered by the statement above.

Neil (Timberman)



THE MEANING OF ROYAL REGIMENTS
Evening Post, Volume CXXII, Issue 148, 19 December 1936, Page 27
 
 
THE MEANING OF ROYAL REGIMENTS
Army regiments are. hoping that the King will follow precedent in his Coronation Honours by conferring on several regiments the prefix "Royal," a cherished privilege that carries with it the right, to wear "Royal blue" facings, says the "Evening Standard." The 4th/7th Dragoon Guards were granted this distinction the other day. In this instance, however, it was more a case of restoring the prefix, for the ijehior half of the amalgamation was the 4th Royal Irish Dragoon Guards.
Of the sixty scarlet-coated infantry regiments today, twenty-two have the honour of being called "Royal," "King's Own," "Queen's Own," or some other title denoting Royal favour. These regiments are distinguished by the dark blue collars and cuffs of their tunics instead of the white, buff, green, or yellow of regiments not so honoured.
A departure from precedent was made last year when King George, on his birthday, ordered that the Buffs, Northumberland Fusiliers, and Norfolk Regiment should thenceforward be designated "Royal." !
So great is their seniority in the Army List that the Buffs (Royal East Kent' Regiment), the Royal' Northumberland Fusiliers, and the Royal Norfolk Regiment were permitted by King George to retain their old facings respectively of buff, gosling green, and yellow.
Some "Royal" titles go far back into the history of the Army; others were conferred comparatively recently. The Royal Army Service "Corps and the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, for instance, were granted this, honour in November, 1918, in recognition of their splendid services in the Great War.
The title of "The Royal Regiment" was conferred on the Royail Scots by Charles II "in 1684 after they had successfully defended his new possession of Tangier against the Moors. His
Queen, Catherine, of Braganza.is commemorated in the title of the Queen's Royal Regiment (West Surrey).
Two Lancashire regiments, the King's Own Royal Regiment (Lancaster) and the King's Regiment (Liverpool), owe their titles to George I, who thus marked his appreciation of their loyalty to-himself in the critical year 1715. The Somerset Light Infantry changed their yellow facings to blue in 1842, when, after their heroic defence of Jellalabad, the Prince Consort bestowed-his name on the regiment and also presented it with aTegimental march composed by himself.
The Cameron Highlanders were named "The Queen's Own" by Queen Victoria, -who also made the Berkshire a "Royal" regiment in recognition of their conduct at Tofrek, in the Sudan, in 1885, when what looked like being a catastrophe was turned into a victory by their steadiness, discipline, and courage. There are still plenty of regiments who are, in the words of a famous colonel of long ago, "neither King's nor Queen's", nor Royal Marines, but just plain old —the Foot."
Among these are the Lancashire Fusiliers, who won undying fame in the landing at Gallipoli, the Worcestershire Regiment, whose recapture of Gheluvelt was an outstanding exploit in the early days of the war, and the Manchester Regiment whom King George honoured by becoming their Colonel-in-Chief in 1930.
The King is Colonel-in-Chief of the following.regiments which are not yet. entitled to the "royal blue" distinction: the South Wales Borderers, with grass green facings; the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, with white; the Prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire), with buff; the Middlesex Regiment (Duke of Cambridge's Own), with lemon yellow; and the Seaforth Highlanders, with buff.


Timberman

Offline timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #466 on: August 04, 2018, 01:51:46 PM »
A GREAT RECORD
Evening Post, Volume CIX, Issue 149, 27 June 1930, Page 3
A GREAT RECORD
MANCHESTER REGIMENT
ALLIANCE WITH SOUTHLAND
(From ,"Tho Post's" Representative.) LONDON, 15th May.
, To-day the King ?is receiving at Buckingham Palace, a representative party of officers from the Regular and .Territorial battalions' of the Manchester Regiment, of which His Majesty became Colonel-in-Chief towards the end of last year. The Manchester Regiment is allied with the Southland Regiment, New Zealand Military Forces, and the Ist Battalion, now quartered at Shorneliffe, is under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Bernard Freybcrg, V.C.
Some particulars about the regiment arc given by a correspondent of "The Times." At one period during the war there were 54 battalions of .the regiment in existence, 42 being shown in the Army List, of which -7 served overseas. The total of all ranks killed, wounded, missing, or who died of disease was about 45,000, while the number killed in action or who died of wounds was 14,122. Between them, the battalions earned during the war twelve Victoria Crosses, the earliest being those awarded to Second Lieutenant Leach and Sergeant Hogan, of the 2nd Battalion, for their great gallantry at Festubert on 29th October, 1914.' WEST INDIES AND CRIMEA. j The Ist Battalion was originally the CBrd Foot, being constituted in 1758 from the 2nd.Battalion of the Bth (The King's)— General Wolfe's regiment. Twenty-five years later it became known ag "The 63rd" West Suffolk regiment." Beading through its earlier records one is struck by the frequency with which- it served and fought in the I West Indies. In all, during the 'first; sixty years or so of its existence it j seems to have been there for four different periods,' lasting for a total of seventeen years, though, service in America during the W,ar of Independence, two expeditions to- Holland, and one each to Ferrol and Madeira, together with more humdrum duty in the United Kingdom, Gibraltar, and Malta intervened. But Guadalcupe and Martinique both figure in the regimental battle honours, the former twice, and it is a fact that the 63rd assisted in the seizure or occupation of each of .these islands on.no fewer than three distinct occasions. In the Crimea the regiment fought gallantly in the battles culminating in the capture of Sevastopol. Landing in Kalamita Bay, 1068. strong in September, 1854, they embarked again at Balaclava in May, 1856, having lost in the interval 947 officers and men killed, died of wounds, or invalided. But they did not embark for England. Instead, they were sent to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where, and in Canada, tticy remained until 1565. By 1870 they wore in India, and ten years later served during the later phases of the Second Afghan War. THE MAORI WAR. No fewer than five regiments numbered 96 were raised and disbanded between. 1761 and 1818, but in 1824, during a new threat of war with France, a sixth 96th, the' real forbear of the present 2nd .Battalion, was raised in Manchester. It was immediately sent abroad, returning home in 1835. Six years later saw it in New South Wales, with detachments in Van Dieman's Laud, and in 1844 one of its companies was on active service against the Maoris in. New Zealand, for which, in 1870, another battle honour was tardily granted. After five years' service in Australia the 96th'was sent to India until the end of 1854, when it returned to the United Kingdom. Hero it remained for nine years until it went to the Cape, and, in 180.), again to India. Returning home in 1873, it was linked with the OSrd Regiment to form the 16th. Infantry Brigade, the depot of which was at : Ashton-under-Lyn, in Lancashire.


Timberman

Offline timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #467 on: August 04, 2018, 01:53:19 PM »
MANCHESTER REGIMENT
Evening Post, Volume CIX, Issue 39, 15 February 1930, Page 7
 
 
MANCHESTER REGIMENT
(From "The Post's" Representative.) LONDON, 23rd December. His Majesty the King has been pleased to become Colonel-in-Chief of the Manchester Regiment. The Southland Regiment, New Zealand Military Forces, Invercargill, is allied with the Manchester Regiment. General the Hon. Sir Herbert A. Lawrence, G.C.8., D.C.L., LL.D., Retired Pay, p.s.c., is Colonel of the Manchester Regiment, and Lieutenant-Colonel B. C. Freyberg, V.C., C.M.G.,D.5.0., LL.D., p.s.c, commands the Ist Battalion of the regiment.

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #468 on: August 04, 2018, 01:53:32 PM »
PRIVATE KILLED
Evening Post, Volume CXXV, Issue 60, 12 March 1938, Page 9

PRIVATE KILLED
AFFRAY AT GALILEE
(Received March 12, 12.30 p.m.)

JERUSALEM, March 11.
British troops caused heavy casualties among’ armed bands of Arabs at Galilee but a stray shot killed Private Michael Fury, of the Manchester Regiment. Ten Arab corpses were found and a prisoner was taken.

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #469 on: August 04, 2018, 01:55:01 PM »
WAR MISCELLANY
Evening Post, Volume CXXX, Issue 19, 22 July 1940, Page 8
 
WAR MISCELLANY
LONDON, July 19. - The former War Secretary, . Mr. Oliver Stanley, has been appointed an honorary colonel in the Manchester Regiment. . ,

PARIS, July 20th
 A police census revealed that more than 3,000,000 persons fled from ,the Paris region during the invasion, the population being 1,938,000 at July 7.

Timberman