Author Topic: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment  (Read 18679 times)

Offline timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #420 on: April 06, 2018, 08:33:47 PM »

PLEASE NOTE
All of the information on this thread is taken from different sources most are copyright of groups or individuals, I have checked the use of sections on all the sites. I understand that if they are being used for non profit or non commercial use it is OK to put them on our site.
Please bear this in mind if you use any of the information on this thread.
Thank-you

If anything does infringe copyright let me know and I will gladly remove it.

I now have written permission to reproduce alot of the articles on this forum. The rest are covered by the statement above.

Neil (Timberman)




WW1 Medals part one

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Timberman
« Last Edit: April 06, 2018, 08:36:32 PM by timberman »

Offline timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #421 on: April 06, 2018, 08:34:42 PM »
WW1 Medals part two

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Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #422 on: April 06, 2018, 08:35:25 PM »
WW1 Medals part three

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Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #423 on: April 06, 2018, 08:37:49 PM »
Title: Re: snippets of Manchester Regiment articles
Post by: timberman on May 26, 2010, 02:46:14 PM
________________________________________
After a bit of a break from the snippets, I'm going to start again next week.

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #424 on: April 06, 2018, 08:39:11 PM »
Russian Destroyers Captured
Ashburton Guardian, Volume XXI, Issue 6202, 24 February 1904, Page2



Russian Destroyers Captured
The Singapore Garrison.
London, Feb. 22. Mr Burnett Burleigh states that the Japanese captured four destroyers by using Russian signals. - The Orel and Smolensk, cruisers of the Russian Volunteer fleet, have returned to Suez.
A draft of two hundred men of the Second Manchester Regiment will reinforce the garrison at Singapore.

© National Library of New Zealand

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #425 on: April 06, 2018, 08:40:12 PM »
OUR DEFENDERS IN EGYPT.
Poverty Bay Herald, Volume XLII, Issue 13585, 13 January 1915, Page 3

 
OUR DEFENDERS IN EGYPT.
(Received January 13, 1 p.m.) SYDNEY, Jan. 13. The Herald's Egyptian correspondent says: — AtMena> behind the Pyramids, the Australian infantry camp. The Light Horse are at Maerda, alongside the New Zealanders. Heliopolis is east of the Lancashire division. The Manchester Regiment guards the citadeile. Many territorials are quartered m Cairo, which is full of refugees from Palestine. ? A Cairo newspaper remarks that the Australians and New Zealanders are superior people. The young men seem to be of good family and to have plenty of money.

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #426 on: April 06, 2018, 08:58:36 PM »
John Broadbent
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Colonel John Broadbent (4 September 1872 – 9 June 1938) was a British army officer and Conservative politician.
Broadbent was educated at Stamford Academy, Ashton-under-Lyne. In 1895 he received a commission in the 3rd Volunteer Battalion of the Manchester Regiment. Broadbent served as part of the detachment the battalion sent to serve with the regular army during the Second Boer War.
When the Territorial Force was created in 1908, the 3rd VB of the Manchesters became the 9th Battalion (TF). Broadbent, by this time holding the rank of major, transferred to the new force. He resigned his commission in 1912, but rejoined the battalion in 1914 on the outbreak of the First World War. He went on to be promoted to lieutenant-colonel and command the battalion.
After the war he became involved in politics, becoming the president of the Ashton Conservative Association. At the 1929 general election, he was the party's candidate in Ashton-under-Lyne, but lost by a margin of over 3,000 votes to the sitting Labour MP, Albert Bellamy.
However, Bellamy died in March 1931, causing a by-election. Broadbent was again the Conservative candidate, and he campaigned vigorously on the issue of trade tariffs. He hired a shop window in the centre of the town which he filled with a display of imported textiles and goods that he claimed were displacing locally produced goods. In the event, Broadbent was elected with a majority of 1,415, helped by a split in the Labour vote caused by the presence of a candidate for Oswald Mosley's New Party. He held the seat at the 1931 general election, with an increased majority. However,at the 1935 general election he was defeated by the Labour Party candidate Fred Simpson by a majority of only 114 votes.
Broadbent was a large landowner in Derbyshire's Hope Valley, and he died at his residence in the area, "Bella Vista", Castleton in June 1938, aged 65

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #427 on: April 06, 2018, 09:53:11 PM »
Athol Alexander Stuart
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Athol Alexander Paul Rees Stuart (born 1881) was an English rower who won the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Henley, the Wingfield Sculls and the London Cup to achieve the rowing triple crown in 1909.
Stuart was the son of Montague Pelham Stuart, of Steynton, Surbiton and his wife Mary Rees. He was educated at Cheltenham College and spent two terms at Caius College, Cambridge. In 1900 he became a Lieutenant in the 6th Battalion the Manchester Regiment and served in the Second Anglo-Boer War.
Stuart rowed for Kingston Rowing Club and was runner up to Alexander McCulloch in the Diamond Challenge Sculls at Henley Royal Regatta in 1908. He won the Diamond Challenge Sculls in 1909 beating R Lucas. Later in 1909 he won the Wingfield Sculls, beating William Kinnear. Stuart also won the London Cup at the Metropolitan Regatta, winning the triple crown in the year.
Stuart served in the First World War as a captain and adjutant of the Manchester Regiment and a major in the Sherwood Foresters.
Stuart's brother Douglas Stuart was a Cambridge University and Olympic rower.

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #428 on: April 06, 2018, 10:25:38 PM »
Thanks to Charlie I'll try and explain the medals a bit better.

   The 1914 Star   
   Established in April 1917.
   Also known as 'Pip' or the 'Mons Star'.
   This bronze medal award was authorized by King George V in April 1917 for those who had served in France or Belgium between 5th August 1914 to midnight on 22nd November 1914 inclusive. The award was open to officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces, doctors and nurses as well as Royal Navy, Royal Marines, Royal Navy Reserve and Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve who served ashore with the Royal Naval Division in France or Belgium.
   A narrow horizontal bronze clasp sewn onto the ribbon, bearing the dates '5th AUG. - 22nd NOV. 1914' shows that the recipient had actually served under fire of the enemy during that period. For every seven medals issued without a clasp there were approximately five issued with the clasp.
   
   Recipients who received the medal with the clasp were also entitled to attach a small silver heraldic rose to the ribbon when just the ribbon was being worn.
   The reverse is plain with the recipient's service number, rank, name and unit impressed on it.
   It should be remembered that recipients of this medal were responsible for assisting the French to hold back the German army while new recruits could be trained and equipped. Collectively, they fully deserve a great deal of honour for their part in the first sixteen weeks of the Great War. This included the battle of Mons, the retreat to the Seine, the battles of Le Cateau, the Marne, the Aisne and the first battle of Ypres. There were approximately 378,000 1914 Stars issued.
   
         The 1914-15 Star
   Established in December 1918.
   
   Also known as 'Pip'.
   This bronze medal was authorized in 1918. It is very similar to the 1914 Star but it was issued to a much wider range of recipients. Broadly speaking it was awarded to all who served in any theatre of war against Germany between 5th August 1914 and 31st December 1915, except those eligible for the 1914 Star. Similarly, those who received the Africa General Service Medal or the Sudan 1910 Medal were not eligible for the award.
   Like the 1914 Star, the 1914-15 Star was not awarded alone. The recipient had to have received the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. The reverse is plain with the recipient's service number, rank, name and unit impressed on it.
   An estimated 2.4 million of these medals were issued.
   The British War Medal, 1914-18   Established on 26th July 1919.
   
   Also known as 'Squeak'.
   The silver or bronze medal was awarded to officers and men of the British and Imperial Forces who either entered a theatre of war or entered service overseas between 5th August 1914 and 11thNovember 1918 inclusive. This was later extended to services in Russia, Siberia and some other areas in 1919 and 1920.
   Approximately 6.5 million British War Medals were issued. Approximately 6.4 million of these were the silver versions of this medal. Around 110,000 of a bronze version were issued mainly to Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps. The front (obv or obverse) of the medal depicts the head of George V.
   The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.
   The Allied Victory Medal
   
   Also known as 'Wilfred'
   It was decided that each of the allies should each issue their own bronze victory medal with a similar design, similar equivalent wording and identical ribbon.
   The British medal was designed by W. McMillan. The front depicts a winged classical figure representing victory.
   Approximately 5.7 million victory medals were issued. Interestingly, eligibility for this medal was more restrictive and not everyone who received the British War Medal ('Squeak') also received the Victory Medal ('Wilfred'). However, in general, all recipients of 'Wilfred' also received 'Squeak' and all recipients of 'Pip' also received both 'Squeak' and 'Wilfred'.
   The recipient's service number, rank, name and unit was impressed on the rim.
   The Territorial Force War Medal, 1914-1919
   
   Instituted on 26th April 1920.
   Only members of the Territorial Force and Territorial Force Nursing Service were only eligible for this medal. They had to have been a member of the Territorial Force on or before 30thSeptember 1914 and to have served in an operational theatre of war outside the United Kingdom between 5th August 1914 and 11th November 1918. An individual who was eligible to receive the 1914 Star or 1914/15 Star could not receive the Territorial War Medal.
   The obverse (front) of the medal shows an effigy of King George V with the words GEORGIVS BRITT OMN:REX ET IND: IMP:
   
   The reverse of the medal has the words TERRITORIAL WAR MEDAL around the rim, with a laurel wreath and the words inside the wreath FOR VOLUNTARY SERVICE OVERSEAS 1914-1919.
   Approximately 34,000 Territorial Force War Medals were issued.
   The Silver War Badge
   
   The Silver War Badge was issued on 12th September 1916.
   The badge was originally issued to officers and men who were discharged or retired from the military forces as a result of sickness or injury caused by their war service. After April 1918 the eligibility was amended to include civilians serving with the Royal Army Medical Corps, female nurses, staff and aid workers.
   Around the rim of the badge was inscribed “For King and Empire; Services Rendered”. It became known for this reason also as the “Services Rendered Badge”. Each badge was also engraved with a unique number on the reverse, although this number is not related to the recipient's Service Number.
   The recipient would also receive a certificate with the badge. The badge was made of Sterling silver and was intended to be worn on the right breast of a recipient's civilian clothing. It could not be worn on a military uniform.
   There were about 1,150,000 Silver War Badges issued in total for First World War service.


The following is from the NA.

The British War Medal

The British War Medal, a silver medal, was approved in 1919. In the Army it was issued to those who entered a theatre of war on duty or rendered approved service overseas between 5 August 1914 and 11 November 1918. It was issued without the Allied Victory Medal to certain regular and mobilised personnel who did not see any active service. The medal was also awarded for certain specified services in Russia and some other areas during 1919 and 1920. Similar rules applied to those serving with the RAF/RFC. The award could be made posthumously. About six and a half million silver medals were issued. Some 110,000 British War Medals in bronze were issued to the Chinese, Maltese and Indian Labour Corps personnel, and a few other colonial units of a non-combatant and subsidiary nature.

The Allied Victory Medal

The Allied Victory Medal, a bronze medal, was awarded to all those who received the 1914 or 1914-15 Star (see below), and with certain exceptions, to those who received the British War Medal. It was never awarded alone. To be eligible it was necessary to have been mobilised in any of the fighting services and to have served in any of the theatres of operations between 5 August 1914 and 11 November 1918. In certain circumstances service up to 13 January 1919 was acceptable. Similarly, women who served (eg as nurses) could receive the award. The medal could be awarded posthumously.

The 1914 Star

The 1914 Star (popularly known as the Mons Star) was of bronze and was authorised in April 1917 to those who served in France or Belgium on the strength of a unit between 5 August and 22 November 1914. All officers and men of the British and Indian Expeditionary Forces, civilian doctors, nursing sisters, nurses and others employed in military hospitals were included. In October 1919 the King sanctioned the award of a bar to the Star to all who had been under fire in France and Belgium during the relevant period.

The 1914-15 Star (a bronze star similar in design to the 1914 Star) was sanctioned in 1918 and awarded to all who saw service in any theatre of war against the Central Powers between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915, except those eligible for the 1914 Star.

The Territorial Force War Medal

The Territorial Force War Medal was approved in April 1920. The bronze medal was awarded to all members of the Territorial Force (including nursing sisters) who volunteered for overseas service not later than 30 September 1914 and who had so served between 4 August 1914 and 11 November 1918. They had to be serving in the Territorial Force on 4 August 1914 or must have completed four years Territorial Force service before that date and rejoined not later than 30 September 1914. In addition, they must not have been eligible for the 1914 Star or the 1914-15 Star. Eligibility terminated on 11 November 1918 although the dates 1914-1919 appear on the medal.

The Allied Subjects Medal

The Allied Subjects Medal was instituted in 1922 and awarded by the Foreign Office to Allied personnel who, at risk to their own lives or liberty, assisted British soldiers behind enemy lines during the War of 1914 to 1918. The medal was issued in silver or bronze, but in some cases only 'thank you' letters were despatched. The roll for this award (WO 329/2957) contains the names of French and Belgian men and women, and also of Danish, Dutch and other nationals, and their addresses are usually given.

The Silver War Badge for Services Rendered

The Silver War Badge for Services Rendered was authorised on 12 September 1916 for officers and men of HM Forces who had been retired or discharged on account of wounds or sickness caused by war service, at home or abroad from 4 August 1914. The regulations were extended on several later dates to include wider categories, including women.

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #429 on: April 08, 2018, 03:43:04 PM »
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Sir Norman Henry Pownall Whitley KCB MC (7 April 1890 – 31 January 1982) was a British Army officer, judge and Olympic silver medalist.

 Early life and education
Olympic medal record
Men's Lacrosse

Silver   1908 London
Team competition

Whitley was born at the London Hospital, the youngest son of Walter Ernest Whitley CH by his wife Eliza Rose McGhee. The Whitley family lived in the City of Westminster where his father practiced law, conveniently close to the Royal Courts of Justice and the various Inns of Court. In 1897, at the age of seven, Whitley was admitted into Westminster School and was educated there until 1903 when he went to Eton College. Whitley lived in the Cotton Hall House until he left in 1908. Whitley was a member of the Lacrosse team roster in the 1908 Summer Olympics hosted by Great Britain. The British team went on to win silver in the Lacrosse at the 1908 Summer Olympics, losing to Canada. He then went on to begin his military career.
 Military life
On leaving Eton, Whitley was commissioned into the Manchester Regiment. After basic training he was assigned to India where he remained until 1922. While in India, he met Florence May Erskine (14 July 1895-11 August 1990) while she was treating him for several flesh wounds. They were married in 1920 by a chaplin in his unit. The Whitleys continued living and serving in India when their first son, James Norman, was born. Two years later the family were dispatched to the crown colony of Singapore in early 1923. It was here that Norman and Florence's second son, Peter, was born. Subsequently, the remaining three children were also born in Singapore. In 1930 Whitley asked to be re-assigned to mainland England and was subsequently given permission. The family settled in Windsor in the county of Berkshire until Whitley retired from the British Army in 1950. Whitley had been awarded the Military Cross in 1918. In 1965 he was also created a Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath (Military division). He and Florence then moved to Lancashire. He lived there until his death in 1982.
 Children
1.   James Norman Whitley, 31 August 1921
2.   Peter Whitley, 22 October 1923
3.   Henry Daniel Whitley, 9 May 1924-2 June 1944
4.   Margaret Yvonne Whitley, 3 June 1925
5.   Virginia Louise Helena Whitley, 19 October 1926
At the time of his death in 1982, Sir Norman had eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #430 on: April 08, 2018, 03:47:12 PM »
PART ONE of TEN

THE 5TH (ARDWICK) VOLUNTEER BATTALION,
THE MANCHESTER REGIMENT,

ALTHOUGH the Volunteer system, as
we know it only dates from the
year 1859, there were military
Volunteers so far back as the time of
Henry VIII., in whose reign there was
a body known as the Fraternity, or
"Guyld of St. George/' which later developed
into the "Honourable Artillery
Company of London." It was in ,1779,
however, that Volunteers became a real and
substantial part of national defence, when,
on France threatening to invade Ireland,
the northern gentry " volunteered" to provide
some 40,000 Protestants as auxiliaries
to the regular forces. In the same year
Sir Thomas Egerton, of Heaton Park,
raised, at his own expense, a regiment of
400 men, who were called the Royal Lancashire
Volunteers; and, in 1782, the inhabitants
of Manchester raised a corps of
150 Volunteers to serve during the war in
America. Of this latter corps, Thomas B.
Bay ley was the Lieutenant-Colonel Commandant,
and George Lloyd was the
Major; and it is recorded that Mrs. Lloyd
presented the regiment with colours, worked
by the ladies of Manchester, and that the
officers' commissions, dated September
24th, were presented to them in St. Ann's
Square. Early in the present century, when
Napoleon, flushed with success, threatened
the invasion of England, the country rose
in arms, and in the year 1805 nearly
500,000, of whom 70,000 were Irish, entered
the ranks of our citizen army. Nothing,
however, came of Napoleon's menaces, and
in the course of a few years this new
auxiliary force, with the exception of the
Yeomanry, was practically disbanded.
Later, Napoleon " the Little " attempted to
emulate his uncle, and his boasts and those
of his officers had the effect of stirring up
the Press and the public. In 1846 Sir
Charles Napier wrote a remarkable pamphlet
upon The Defence of England by
Volunteer Corps—Militia," which was the
basis of the movement that, in 1859, developed
into the Volunteer system as known
to us. On May 12th, 1859, General Peel,
then Secretary for War, issued the circularletter
to the lord-lieutenants of counties,
authorising them to accept the services of
Volunteer corps, each to number not more
than 100 officers and men. The movement
was enthusiastically supported, for, according
to the first efficiency calculation, taken
at the end of 1860, there were 106,443
efficients, and 12,703 non-efficients, a remarkable
addition to the defensive forces
of the country. In June of the same year,
a corps of Volunteers was formed in Manchester,
and its services were accepted by
the Government. This, which was known
as the 6th Lancashire Reg'ment, was
followed by the formation at different times
of other independent corps.

Timberman
« Last Edit: April 08, 2018, 05:02:54 PM by timberman »

Offline timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #431 on: April 08, 2018, 03:47:48 PM »
PART TWO

One of the first PO formed was the 33rd
Lancashire Rifle Volunteers, or Ardwick
Regiment, which, later, became the 20th
Lancashire, or 2nd Manchester Rifle Volunteers,
and is now known as the 5th (Ardwick)
Volunteer Battalion, the Manchester
Regiment, the subject of this notice. The
corps was originally embodied, in 1860, as
the 33rd Lancashire Rifle Volunteers, its
services be'ng accepted by War Office letter
dated Januarv 17th of that vear, and then
consisted of three companies—increased to
four in the following March—commanded
by Captain-Commandant^ afterwards
Major, Francis Preston, who, on May 28th,
1860, resigned the command to Major J.
H. Cunliffe, under whose command the
corps, which had in the meantime increased
to live companies, attended the reviews at
Newton-le-Willows on August 11th, 1860;
at Knowsley on September 1st, 1860; and
again at Newton-le-Willows on August 3rd,
1861. An important step was taken on
April 12th, 1862, when the 78th Lancashire
Rifle Volunteers—the 4th Manchester—
was incorporated with the 33rd, which then
consisted of eleven companies, commanded
bv Lieutenant-Colonel J. H. Cunliffe. with
W. Wilmott Mawson as Major.

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #432 on: April 08, 2018, 03:48:25 PM »
PART THREE

The year was further marked by the opening, on
July 12th, of the rifle range at Astley; and
on the 30th of the following August the
corps took part in the sham fight and night
attack at Altcar. A further development
took place on February 10th, 1864, when
the 28th Lancashire Rifle Volunteers—the
2nd Manchester—became incorporated with
the 33rd, which was permtted henceforward
to bear the additional title of " 2nd
Manchester/* the commanding officer of
the late 28th L.R.V., Lieutenant-Colonel
Deakin, becoming honorary Colonel of the
corps. It then consisted of fourteen companies,
which were afterwards consolidated
in twelve, under the command of Leutenant-
Colonel Commandant J. H. Cunliffe,
with Lieutenant-Colonel W. Wilmott Mawson
as senior field officer, and under him
took part in the reviews in Hyde Park,
before her Majesty the Queen, on May 28th,
1864; at York, before H.R.H. the Prince
of Wales, on August 11th, 1866; and
before H.R.H. the Duke of Cambridge,
K.G., at Liverpool, on October 8th, 1867.
On March 8th, 1872, the command of the
corps devolved upon Lieutenant-Colonel W.
Wilmott Mawson, who retained the position
until August 17th, 1875, when he was succeeded
by Lieutenant-Colonel S. Scott.
Under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel
Scott, the corps took part in the Easter
Monday field days at Tring, April 17th,
1876, and at Dunstable, April 2nd, in the
following year; and was also prominent in
the Royal Reviews before H.R.H. the Prince
of Wales, in Hyde Park, July 1st, 1876;
and before her Majesty the Queen, at
Windsor, on July 10th, 1881, when it was
the strongest corps on the ground, there
being nearly 1,100 of all ranks present.
In Whit-week of 1880, the corps for the
first time went into camp, the place selected
being Colwyn Bay, and in the four following
years the same locality was chosen as
a site for the encampment.

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #433 on: April 08, 2018, 03:50:01 PM »
PART FOUR

In October, 1880, as a result of the re-numbering of
corps in the county, the 33rd became the
20th Lancashire, or 2nd Manchester R.V.
In consequence of the retirement of
Colonel Scott, the command of the corps
devolved, on December 5th, 1885, upon
Lieutenant-Colonel Henry L. Rocca, with
Lieutenant-Colonel J. Lees Aspland and
Majors W. H. Hopkins and T. W. Brown
as field officers, under whose direction the
corps encamped in 1886 and 1887 at Prestatyn,
near Rhyl. The corps has usually
been prominent among the other battalions,
having invariably taken part in all the
reviews and brigade drills held in the neighbourhood
of Manchester.
As the true quality and value of troops
are dependent upon their fitness for the
operations of war, Colonel Rocca, the new
commanding officer, endeavoured so far as
possible to instruct the battalion in such
matters as cannot be practised in the
ordinary drills, and, with this view, gave
lectures to the officers, commissioned and
non-commissioned, at headquarters, during
the winter months, and, while in camp,
exercised the battalion in outpost duties,
methods of attack and defence, the construction
of shelter-trenches, and other
similar work. This practice was begun in
1886, when the corps first encamped at
Prestatyn, and has been regularly continued,
so far as practicable, at every subsequent
encampment.
On several occasions the battalion has had
some of the experiences likely to attend
active operations, notably during its second
encampment, in 1887, at Prestatyn, when
the weather was so unfavourable, that, after
twenty-four hours of continuous heavy rain,
the camp, on the Friday afternoon, was
flooded to such an extent that some 650 men
had to be quartered in the adjoining village,
barns, schoolhouses, and other buildings
being utilised for the purpose, the task of
quartering being carried out in strict military
order.

Timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #434 on: April 08, 2018, 04:48:55 PM »
PART FIVE

About 200 men remained in
the camp during the night under anything
but pleasant conditions, and on the Saturday
morning the battalion bivouacked on
elevated ground above the camp, and in the
evening returned to Manchester.
During the same year, 1887, the battalion
took part in the reception of their Royal
Highnesses the Prince and Princess of
Wales, on the occasion of the opening of the
Manchester Royal Jubilee Exhibition; and
on October 1st following, was prominent
in the review of all the troops in the
neighbourhood of Manchester, held on the
occasion of the visit of H.R.H. the Duke
of Cambridge, for the purpose of opening
the new headquarters and drill hall of the
battalion, which ceremony he had performed
on the previous day.
In 1888 the battalion encamped near St.
Annes-on-the-Sea, and, with the other corps
encamped in the neighbourhood, took part,
under the command of Major-General
Daniels, in a "field day" in Lytham Park.
On August 8th, in the same year, the
official denomination of the battalion was,
by Horse Guards' letter, altered to the 5th
(or Ardwick) Volunteer Battalion, the Manchester
Regiment.
Together with the 2nd and 4th V.B.M.R.,
the battalion, in 1889, formed a brigade
camp, under the command of the Brigadier,
Colonel Blundell, at Skegness. This experience
was both interesting and highly
instructive, the battalion being engaged in
outpost, attack, and defence operations,
both by day and by night. Colwyn Bay
was the place selected for the encampments
in 1890 and 1892, and in the intervening
year, 1891, it proceeded with the 1st, 2nd,
and 4th V.B.M.R.. to a brigade camp at
Aldershot, an outing which will be long remembered
by all present, not less on
account of the most inclement weather,
from which all ranks suffered during the
whole week, than for some valuable instructive
work done under the supervision of Sir
Evelvn Wood. In 1893 the battalion encamped
at South Shore, Blackpool, and,
with the 1st and 4th V.B.M.R., formed in
brigade under Colonel Church. In the
following year the same ground was utilised
for a battalion camp, and again, in 1895, for a brigade camp, when the whole of the
six battalions of the Manchester Volunteer
Infantry Brigade encamped together for the
first time, under the command of Colonel
Graeme, and were inspected by Major-
General Sir Baker Russell.

Timberman