Author Topic: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment  (Read 19832 times)

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #285 on: January 07, 2018, 08:42:20 PM »
PLEASE NOTE
All of the information on this thread is taken from different sources most are copyright of groups or individuals, I have checked the use of sections on all the sites. I understand that if they are being used for non profit or non commercial use it is OK to put them on our site.
Please bear this in mind if you use any of the information on this thread.
Thank-you

If anything does infringe copyright let me know and I will gladly remove it.

I now have written permission to reproduce alot of the articles on this forum. The rest are covered by the statement above.

Neil (Timberman)






Reproduced with permission of Mike Roden from his web site

Aftermath - When the Boys Came Home

http://www.aftermathww1.com
 
The Poems of Wilfred Owen
The review of Owen's poetry which follows was recently republished by the Guardian in one of their "Centenary" supplements looking at the 20th century decade by decade as it appeared in the pages of that newspaper.
Owen is so much enmeshed in the overall image of the Great War that it is difficult to remember that there was a time when few people had heard of him. Thus the review published on December 29th, 1920, just over two years after his death is fascinating as a record of someone's first experience of reading the poems. I don't yet know who the reviewer "CP" was, but it is not impossible that he had been through similar experiences to Owen.
Sassoon, who edited the poems wanted the work to speak for itself, and refused to give any but the briefest details of the poet; which made him rather like the Unknown Warrior whose image and personality and identity could change depending on who was talking or thinking about him.
Geoff Dyer, in The Missing of the Somme, makes a very pertinent point:
To a nation stunned by grief the prophetic lag of posthumous publication made it seem that Owen was speaking from the other side of the grave. Memorials were one sign of the shadow cast by the dead over England in the twenties; another was a surge of interest in spiritualism. Owen was the medium through whom the missing spoke.
________________________________________
WILFRED OWEN'S POEMS

Poems. By Wilfred Owen. London: Chatto and Windus. Pp. ix. 33. 6s. net.
 
Lieutenant Wilfred Owen, MC., an officer of the Manchester Regiment, was killed in action on the Sambre Canal a week before the Armistice, aged 25. The twenty-three poems of this collection are the fruit of not quite two years' active service, less than half of it in the field. But they are enough to rank him among the very few war poets whose work has more than a passing value. Others have shown the disenchantment of war, have unlegended the roselight and romance of it, but none with such compassion for the disenchanted nor such sternly just and justly stern judgment on the idyllisers. To him the sight and sound of a man gassed suffice to give the lie to "dulce et decorum" and the rest of it. The atrophy that he damns is not that of the men who fought -
       having seen all things red,
The eyes are rid
Of the hurt of the colour of blood for ever;
it is the atrophy of those who "by choice...made themselves immune from
         What ever shares
The eternal reciprocity of tears.
If he glorifies the soldiers - and he does, gloriously - it is as victim, not as victor; not as the hero achieving, but as one whose sacrificial love passes the love of women:
O Live, your eyes lose lure
When I behold eyes blinded in my stead...
Heart, you were never hot,
Nor large, nor full like hearts made great with shot:
And though your hand be pale,
Paler are all which trail
Your cross through flame and hail:
Weep, you may weep, for you may touch them not.

His verse, as he says in his preface, is all of the pity of war, and "except in the pity" there is no poetry. But it is a heroic exception, for the pity gets itself into poetry in phrases which are not the elegant chasing of ineffectual silver, but the vital unbeautiful beauty of unwashed gold.
It is the poetry of pain, searing and piercing to pity; it is the poetry of the Tragic Muse, whose visage, though "marred more than any man", is yet transfigured in the sorrow of song. He has revealed the soul of the soldier as no one else has revealed it, not because his vision of the externals was less vivid and cleaving, but because to that vision he added an imagination of the heart that tnade him sure of his values:

...except you share
With them in hell the sorrowful dark of hell,
Whose world is but the trembling of a flare,
And heaven but has the highway for a shell.
You shalt not hear their mirth:
You shall not come to think them well contents
By any jest of mind. These men are worth
Your tears: you are not worth their merriment.
 
Irony his poetry has, and grim humour; but the Spirit of the Pities always breathes through the hutnour and the irony and keeps their bitterness sweet. Sometimes, as in "Mental Cases", the pain is too poignant even for pity, and moves only to the anger of despair; but more often the anger gives place to a beneficent impulse, as in "Strange Meeting" the first and one of the finest of his poems:
Then, when much blood had clogged their chariot wheels
I would go up and wash them from sweet wells,
Even with truths that lie too deep for taint.
This poem happens also to be a good example of a technical innovation that is rather puzzling. Enough has been quoted to show that Owen uses traditional metres and rhymes, but, as here, he also uses, and uses throughout the poem, a device which is neither rhyme nor assonance. It is not assonance because the vowels are different, and in any case it could not be rhyme, because the initial consonants are alike: "spoiled - spilled, "laughed - left", "grained - ground". It looks like a subtly contrived escape from tonal completeness, a calculated deflection from the kindred points of heaven and home, which are rhymes, lest the musical significant should soften the conscious starkness of his treatment. But the result gain is more than doubtful. The thing affects you as the baffling elusiveness of a fugitive pun, or the half-foiled meeting of two stanzas of a sestina; and just because of the baffling and the foiling it fails in its artistic purpose. It is significant that it is not used in his greatest poems, such as "Apologia pro Poemate Meo" and "Greater Love"; and one cannot help feeling that, fine as it is, "Strange Meeting" would have been finer without it. This trick apart, Owen uses words with the poet's questing instinct for the heart of things and his homing instinct for the heart of man. His work will not easily die.
     
Timberman :)
« Last Edit: January 07, 2018, 08:52:24 PM by timberman »

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #286 on: January 08, 2018, 10:51:04 AM »
Title: Re: snippets of Manchester Regiment articles
Post by: timberman on May 26, 2009, 01:59:42 PM
 
WOUNDED SOLDIERS (RELIGIOUS MINISTRATIONS).

HC Deb 26 November 1914 vol 68 c1315 1315

 Mr. SHIRLEY BENN
asked what provision is being made in the various hospitals throughout the United Kingdom for giving religious ministrations to wounded soldiers who have returned from the front?

 Mr. TENNANT
At the larger and more important hospitals chaplains are appointed to give their whole time. At the other hospitals formed during the present emergency the ministrations are given by the local clergy of the various communions, who are appointed by the military authorities as may be necessary.

Mr. SHIRLEY BENN
Are any provisions being made for religious services being held in the wards?

 Mr. TENNANT
I must ask for notice of that question.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #287 on: January 14, 2018, 10:27:37 AM »
Wilfred Owen
Wilfred Owen, born in Oswestry, England, was the eldest of four children. From an early age Owen began to read and write poetry. He followed his mother's evangelical influence and read the bible daily. Without having the necessary finances available to him, and failing to win an academic scholarship, Owen was deprived of a college education. By 1911, Owen had moved to nearby Dunsden to work as a lay reader, only managing to study part-time at the University of Reading.
In 1913 Owen moved to Bordeaux to work as a teacher in the Berlitz School of Languages. Soon after he became a private teacher in a prosperous Pyrenean family. He worked there until 1915 when he returned to Britain to enlist in the Artist's Rifles. After embarking on an officers' training course, Owen was commissioned in 1916. He was shipped to France on 29 December 1916.
Owen returned to Britain on 02 May 1917 after completing four months moving in and out of the frontline. He suffered from shell shock and was treated at the Craiglockhart Hospital, Edinburgh. It was there that he met Seigfried Sassoon. Sassoon is said to have heavily influenced Owen's creative style during this period, encouraging him to explore his shell-shock symptoms in his works. He published works in the hospital journal. In early 1918, after rejoining his regiment, Owen published further poems in acclaimed journals. In September 1918 Owen returned to the frontline. He was killed on 04 November 1918. His parents were notified of his death on 11 November 1918- Armistice day.
Served with 5 Battalion Manchester Regiment from 4 June 1916 (Second Lieutenant). London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 29617, p. 5726, 6 June 1916. Retrieved on 3 June 2009.
Attached to 2 Battalion Manchester Regiment from January 1917 for service on Western Front.
Wounded 2 May 1917 (not mentioned in diary).
Rejoined 2 Battalion in September 1918 after period in hospital in Edinburgh and service at home with 5 Battalion.
WO 95/2397 records his return on 15 September 1918 and on 8 October 1918 mentions the award of a Military Cross for the action of 1-2 October.
WO 95/2397 Killed in action 4 November 1918. The report of the action gives statistics but not names
WO 138/74 Personal file
MH 106/1887-1908 Craiglockhart Hospital
Military Cross, London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 31183, p. 2363, 14 February 1919. Citation London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 31480, p. 9761, 29 July 1919.
"2nd Lt, Wilfred Edward Salter Owen, 5th Bn. Manch. R., T.F., attd. 2nd Bn.
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in the attack on the Fonsomme Line on October lst/2nd, 1918. On the company commander becoming a casualty, he assumed command and showed fine leadership and resisted a heavy counter-attack. He personally manipulated a captured enemy machine gun from an isolated position and inflicted considerable losses on the enemy. Throughout he behaved most gallantly."

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #288 on: January 14, 2018, 10:29:40 AM »
Wilfred Owen

Copy of the letter telling Wilfred of his transfer from the 2nd Artists Rifles to 3/5th Manchester's.


Timberman

Copyright   The English Faculty Library, University of Oxford / The Wilfred Owen Literary Estate
© University of Oxford

Click on the image to make it bigger.


Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #289 on: January 14, 2018, 10:31:35 AM »
The following is a letter from Wilfred to his Mother, dated Jan 4th 1917.
The return address is given as 2nd Manchester Reg. BEF.

Pages 1,2.3.4.

Timberman :)


Copyright   The English Faculty Library, University of Oxford / The Wilfred Owen Literary Estate
© University of Oxford

Click on the image to make it bigger.

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #290 on: January 14, 2018, 10:32:50 AM »
The following is the last pages of the  letter from Wilfred to his Mother, dated Jan 4th 1917.



Timberman 


Copyright   The English Faculty Library, University of Oxford / The Wilfred Owen Literary Estate
© University of Oxford

Click on the image to make it bigger.

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #291 on: January 21, 2018, 11:52:00 AM »
This snippet is thanks to George, one of the Mods. (more to follow)

Click on the pictures to make it bigger.

Thanks for allowing us to share.

Timberman

« Last Edit: January 21, 2018, 11:56:54 AM by timberman »

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #292 on: January 21, 2018, 11:57:16 AM »
Title: Re: snippets of Manchester Regiment articles
Post by: mack on August 03, 2009, 12:43:04 PM
________________________________________

thats a great picture neil.

looks like mick hadnt lost his sense of humour

mack ;D

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #293 on: January 21, 2018, 12:09:58 PM »
This snippet is thanks to George, one of the Mods.

Click on the picture to make it bigger.
Thanks for allowing us to share.

If you save it to your computer  and zoom in on the picture you can read the writing better.

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #294 on: January 21, 2018, 12:11:51 PM »
This snippet is thanks to George, one of the Mods.

Click on the picture to make it bigger.
Thanks for allowing us to share.

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #295 on: January 21, 2018, 12:13:44 PM »
This snippet is thanks to George, one of the Mods.

Click on the picture to make it bigger.
Thanks for allowing us to share.

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #296 on: January 21, 2018, 12:14:40 PM »
Title: Re: snippets of Manchester Regiment articles
Post by: george.theshed197 on August 04, 2009, 01:37:36 AM
________________________________________
Morning all,

The snippets have come out great, many thanks Neil; hoping that everyone enjoys them.
Yes indeed Mack, Mick never did lose his sense of humour and would have us all in stitches whenever we gathered at Ardwick or elsewhere for his birthday parties with his yarns and memories. He was a great character, may he rest in peace.

George.

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #297 on: January 21, 2018, 12:16:59 PM »
Captain Maurice Baldwin Bolton


Newspaper
Description:
Captain Maurice Baldwin Bolton, M.C. 5th attached 4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, who was reported missing on March 21st last, is now known to have died of wounds in a German hospital at Le Cateau, on March 26th. An advertisement in “The Blackburn Times” was the means of the family receiving official news of his death. He was the third son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hargreaves Bolton, of Heightside, Newchurch in Rossendale, Lancashire, and was in his 27th year. Captain Bolton was educated at Shrewsbury School and Pembroke College, Cambridge, where he graduated in History in 1915. At the outbreak of the war he joined the Cambridge O.T.C., and was gazetted to the 11th Battalion Manchester Regiment on August 22nd, 1914. He was promoted Captain in May 1915. In July, 1915, he was transferred to the East Lancashire Regiment, and went out to France in February 1917, being attached to the 1/4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment (Blackburn Territorials). On November 22nd in the same year he was awarded the Military Cross for “Gallant conduct in the field” near Nieuport. In February this year he was transferred to the 4th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, 66th Division. Captain Bolton was well known in the Blackburn district. His two elder brothers, Captain H. H. Bolton and Lieut. J. Bolton, of the 1/5th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment, were killed in Gallipoli. His younger brother, Captain G.G.H. Bolton, M.C., served four years with the same battalion. Reported by: Blackburn Times, 4th January, 1919.


http://www.cottontown.org/Pages/home.aspx

You may freely reproduce this content provided you do not do so in the course of a business and state clearly that the content was provided by for use in the Cotton Town digitization project.

Timberman
« Last Edit: January 21, 2018, 12:18:35 PM by timberman »

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #298 on: January 21, 2018, 12:19:36 PM »
Captain R. Bentham


Newspaper
 Captain R. Bentham, of the R.F.C., son of Mr. Robert Bentham, of Nethertown, Whalley, and formerly of Smallshaw-hey-Farm, Great Harwood, was buried at Newchurch-in-Pendle, on Monday. The deceased officer, as a boy, attended St. John’s C.E. Day School, Great Harwood, and whilst there he gained a Lancashire County Council scholarship, and proceeded to the Accrington Municipal Secondary School. Here he was a most successful student, winning a County Senior Exhibition, passing the Oxford Local Examination with distinctions in the honours division. He also won the “Bridge” Scholarship, and proceeded to the Manchester University to study for degrees in engineering. He passed the Matriculation examination of the Victoria University, with honours, and would have completed his studies for the B.S.c. degree this year. Whilst there he joined the O.T.C., and in September, 1914, passed the examination for officers, and was gazetted Second Lieutenant, being promoted First Lieutenant in a short time, He was in the Manchester Regiment, and whilst in training at Southport had the misfortune to break a leg in motor cycle accident. This prevented him proceeding to the Front with his regiment. On recovery he entered into training again, and whilst at Colchester he was promoted Captain. A short time ago he transferred to the R.F. Corps, and was in training at a flying school in Wiltshire. Whilst flying “solo” on November 8th he met with a fatal accident, being enveloped in a dark cloud, and having engine trouble, was dashed to the ground and instantly killed. The deceased officer was only 21 years of age. He was most highly esteemed as a personal friend, and had the highest commendations as a smart officer of his regiment. A brilliant and most promising career has thus been suddenly been cut short. The funeral was attended by brother officers of the Manchester Regiment, and the Royal Flying Corps, and many civilian friends, in addition to numerous relatives. The service at the house was conducted by the Rev. R. Newman, Vicar of Whalley, and the Vicar of Newchurch-in-Pendle performed the last sad rites. There were many tokens of affectionate regard and esteem and appreciations of the many splendid characteristics of the deceased officer. Reported by: unknown newspaper, 18th November, 1916.

http://www.cottontown.org/Pages/home.aspx

You may freely reproduce this content provided you do not do so in the course of a business and state clearly that the content was provided by for use in the Cotton Town digitization project.

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,872
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #299 on: January 21, 2018, 12:27:53 PM »
Title: Re: snippets of Manchester Regiment articles
Post by: timberman on August 20, 2009, 01:32:29 PM
________________________________________
Corporal Harry Banks


Newspaper
 
Corporal Harry Banks, Manchester Regiment, Railway View, Clitheroe, has been killed whilst sleeping in a dugout in France. He was only 20, and prior to joining he worked in the Clitheroe Branch of the Maypole Company. He was expected home daily, having been recommended for a commission. Reported by: Blackburn Weekly Telegraph, 20th April, 1918.

http://www.cottontown.org/page.cfm?pageid=257&language=eng

You may freely reproduce this content provided you do not do so in the course of a business and state clearly that the content was provided by for use in the Cotton Town digitization project.

Timberman