Author Topic: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment  (Read 21024 times)

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #180 on: August 01, 2017, 09:58:47 PM »
PLEASE NOTE
All of the information on this thread is taken from different sources most are copyright of groups or individuals, I have checked the use of sections on all the sites. I understand that if they are being used for non profit or non commercial use it is OK to put them on our site.
Please bear this in mind if you use any of the information on this thread.
Thank-you

If anything does infringe copyright let me know and I will gladly remove it.

I now have written permission to reproduce alot of the articles on this forum. The rest are covered by the statement above.

Neil (Timberman)





NAVAL AND MILITARY PENSIONS AND GRANTS.

HC Deb 09 November 1916 vol 87 cc433-6W 433W

 Colonel Lord HENRY CAVENDISH-BENTINCK
asked the Secretary of State for War whether he is aware that many widows and old people unable to earn anything for themselves, who before their sons entered the Army were dependent on their earnings for subsistence, find the sum now allowed them as separation allowance inadequate to maintain life; and whether he will cause inquiry to be made into the question with a view to increasing the sum allowed by the State?

 Mr. FORSTER
I can assure my Noble Friend that this has not been overlooked, but I cannot do more at present than refer him to my reply to the hon. Member for the Bridgeton Division of Glasgow on the 2nd November.

 Mr. YEO
asked the Secretary of State for War if his attention has been drawn to the case of Thomas Martin Allen, a soldier discharged as no longer fit for war service after serving one year and 201 days with the Colours, who was in France from 4th January, 1915, to 17th January, 1916, and whose certificate of discharge states he has done his duty well; is he aware that Allen has a wife and seven children whose ages range from fifteen years to two years, and has been compelled to apply for and been granted outdoor relief; and is he aware that the Rochdale Guardians passed a resolution that the attention of the War Office should be drawn to the case of Thomas Martin Allen, a permanently disabled discharged soldier with a pension of 4s. 8d. per week, who has been compelled to apply to this board for relief, and that this board desired to urge upon the War Office the desirability of immediate reform, in the scale of pensions with a view to making them sufficiently adequate to save permanently disabled soldiers and sailors from pauperism?

 Mr. FORSTER
Inquiries are being made, and I will let my hon. Friend know the result.

Mr. MacCALLUM SCOTT
asked the Financial Secretary to the War Office whether he is aware that wives' and dependants' separation allowances are frequently reduced, the only explanation offered being a mere statement that the reduction has been made to refund an over-issue; whether he is aware that many of the recipients are not aware of any over-issue having occurred; and whether he will try to secure that in such cases when a reduction is made the nature of the over-issue will be explained?

 Mr. FORSTER
The intention of the Regulations is that explanation shall be made in such cases, but if the hon. Member will send me particulars of any cases of failure, I will endeavour to secure any necessary improvement.

 Mr. BILLING
asked the Secretary to the Admiralty whether the wife of a sailor gets a smaller separation allowance than the wife of a soldier; and, if so, what steps he proposes to take to remove this grievance?

 Dr. MACNAMARA
The reply to the first part of the question is in the affirmative. As regards the second part, I do not think the term "grievance" can be properly applied. I will send my hon. Friend a copy of the White Paper issued on 22nd September, 1914, which describes fully the reasons why it has been deemed 435W equitable that the scale of separation -allowances for the wife and children of the seaman should differ from that adopted for the wife and children of the soldier.

Mr. BARLOW
asked the Secretary of State for War, with regard to the case of Private W. Spencer, No. 1258, 1st Battalion Manchester Regiment, whether the mother of this soldier, who is now reported missing, is only entitled to the usual allowance for thirty weeks after he is notified as missing; and whether, at the end of thirty weeks, she can receive no more than 4s. 6d. a week pension?

 Mr. FORSTER
. As regards the allowance, the reply is in the affirmative. I am inquiring into the pension, and will let the hon. Member know the result.
 
 Mr. BARLOW
asked the Secretary of State for War, with regard to the case of Sergeant Blakeley, No. 6982, of the 8th Lancashire Fusiliers, transferred on 4th August, 1916, to the Border Regiment, whether he is aware that since mobilisation Blakeley has had 1s. 6d. stopped out of his pay, and his wife has received only 1s. 4d. of this, and that, in spite of repeated applications, the Territorial authorities has ignored her claim to the additional 2d. a day, amounting now to about £3 8s.; and will he say by what authority this has been done?

 Mr. FORSTER
Inquiry is being made, and I will inform my hon. Friend of the result.

 Mr. BARLOW
asked the Secretary of State for War, with regard to the case of Private J. Price, No. 10472, 15th Lancashire Fusiliers, of 24, North James Henry Street, Salford, whether ho is aware that on coming out of hospital at the end of October last Price was informed by the paymaster that he was £6 13s. 2d. in credit; that £4 was then sent to the soldier to Chapel Street, Leigh, instead of Chapel Street, Salford; and, seeing that on the error being pointed out the soldier was informed that he was only £3 15s. in credit, he will say who is responsible for these mistakes and what has become of the difference, namely, £2 18s. 2d.?

 Mr. FORSTER
Inquiries into this case are being made, and my hon. Friend will be informed of the result.

 Mr. HOGGE
asked the Secretary of State for War if he is now in a position 436W to state what action the Government intends to take about increasing the amount of separation allowance?

 Mr. FORSTER
No decision has yet been reached

 Mr. HUGH LAW
asked the Financial Secretary to the War Office the amount of separation allowance which is to be paid to Mrs. Manus O'Donnell, mother of Private John Gallagher, No. 412, military headquarters picket, Arklow; and if he will explain the delay in dealing with the claim, seeing that this soldier enlisted as long ago as the 5th May, 1915?

 Mr. FORSTER
Inquiries will be made and my hon. Friend informed of the result in due course.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman
« Last Edit: August 01, 2017, 10:00:35 PM by timberman »

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #181 on: December 21, 2017, 10:22:36 PM »
Name:   ROTHWELL Alfred
Initials:   A
Nationality:   United Kingdom
Rank:Private
Age   25

Regiment/Service:   Manchester Regiment
Unit Text:   20th
Date of Death:   04/04/1916
Service No:   17474
Casualty Type:   Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference:   II. B. 7.

Comments  Enlisted in Ardwick 9.11.1915. k.i.a by shell fire 10pm to 10.30pm
at Morlahcourt, trench name Kingston Rd - one killed that night. 20th Battalion
Manchester Regiment B Company Platoon 8.


Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #182 on: December 21, 2017, 10:43:42 PM »
Sergeant Richard Tawney

22nd Manchester Regiment

Richard Henry Tawney was a noted economic historian, educator and activist. Born in Calcutta in 1880, the son of a Sanskrit scholar, he was educated at Rugby School and Balliol College, Oxford.
Tawney was badly wounded, aged 36, in the Battle of the Somme. His account of his experience in The Attack (published in the Westminster Gazette in August 1916) is a memorable piece of writing. Following a period of convalescence he worked at the Ministry of Reconstruction. In 1920, Tawney took up an appointment at the London School of Economics, where he became Professor of Economic History in 1931 until 1949.
Richard Tawney died peacefully in his sleep In January 1962.

Taken from the Lost Generation.

Second photo from Wikipedia.

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #183 on: December 21, 2017, 10:44:19 PM »
Sergeant Richard Tawney

22nd Manchester Regiment

THE ATTACK
By R. H. Tawney.

If you go to this link you can read the whole article as it was printed in the Westminster Gazette in 1916


http://leoklein.com/itp/somme/texts/tawney_1916.html

The first few lines

The priest stood in the door of a wooden shanty. The communicants stood and knelt in ranks outside. One guessed at the familiar words through the rattling of rifle bolts, the bursts of song and occasional laughter from the other men, as they put their equipment together outside their little bivouacs, bushes bent till they met and covered with tarpaulins, or smoked happily in an unwonted freedom from fatigues. An hour later we fell in on the edge of the wood, and, after the roll was called by companies, moved off. It was a perfect evening, and the immense overwhelming tranquillity of sky and down, uniting us and millions of enemies and allies in its solemn, unavoidable embrace, dwarfed into insignificance the wrath of man and his feverish energy of destruction.

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #184 on: December 23, 2017, 03:36:13 PM »
IN THE TRENCHES
A CHRISTCHURCH MAN'S EXPERIENCES. The following interesting letter has been receive-ft by Mr. J3. Nordon from Mr. C. F. Humphries, formerly a Christchurch resident, and a prominent Canterbury footballer :— [ ' i "In the Trenches, / November 10, 1914. "Since my last letter to you my life hus bjeen full of excitement and adventurti As you were doubtless aware 1 joineU the Army as a private in the Army ''Service Corps, but was soon promoted to the rank of sergeant at 6s per day. My duty was that of a clerk in a base/ office, some one hundred and fifty r^ilos from the firing line. This position was not at all my idea of the worfy 1 for a strong and healthy New Zealunder, so I applied for a transfer to tlte Manchester Regiment, and in so doinjg had to revert to the ranks, snd I ths.nk my pay is something like 1/2 per 4ay now. It was not long before
I was promoted to lance-corporal, so here I am- as lance-corporal in the British Army Eeg'ulars. "The long marching at first played up with my feet, but 1 walked the blisters off, and after a week my.f:ill pack did not seem half so heavy. Although untrained,. I am pleased to say I have never fallen out once, and I am not far off when there is anything doing. "Life in the trenches or dug-outs is not so bad as long as the weather is kind, but this last couple of days wo have had a heavy fall of snow and plenty of frost, so a person docs not want a veiy vivid imagination to picture the discomforts .under these conditions. But it is wonderful what a human being can put up with when needs must. I have not had a shave or. a wasli for fourteen days now, bur the cause is just and the heart is good, so why worry? Most of the lighting is done at night, and the favourite time for a German attack is just before claybreak. In the day we do most of our sleeping, and the big guns play their little part. The conditions are regards food and clothing in the trenches are perfect. We feed well— bacon, cheßse, bread, jam, the good 'bully beef,' and last, but not least, Tommies' comforts, 'rum and tobacco.' "The trenches we are in are without any Red Cross workers or a doctor and if a man is unfortunately hit at daylight he has got to linger on till dark, Avith only a field bandage (put on by a comrade) before he can be removed to the dressing station, generally two miles behind the trenches. I have witnessed some wonderful cases of fortitude; one I will mention, of a private called Watts, who lay all day long with his both legs shattered by this dreadful shrapnel, and when the stretcher-bearers came for him the trench was too small to allow the stretcher to pass, so he was put into a blanket, and, holding on to the top and trying to help the stretcher-bearers, was dragged with his shattered limbs through the trenches to a place of safety, and during all this he must have been in untold agony, but never a murmur did he make. I only mention this as an example of the great, pain and suffering that goes on, which could be relieved a good deal by the aid of drugs, and if there were enough Red Cross members to man the trenches. "Quite one of the most pleasant times here is mail time, and the green cover of a Weekly Press was one of the most pleasant surprises I have had. Since my short time in the army 1 have done my best to advertise 'God's Own Country,' and quite a, number arc making a weekly allowance, so when the war is over they aie off to fresh fields and pastures new. .1 was pleased to see quite a number of familiar faces in the 'boys for the front/ and the Tommies were' greatly taken with the response our little country has made. I have been much surprised that their arrival in Frar.ee has not 'been announced yet, but hope to see: them in" this quarter before long now. "The Manchester Regiment, I forgot to mention, is attached to the Indian I'Jxpeditionary Force, and mixing with the native regiments such as the Sikhs and Gurkhas, is a novelty I shall never forget."
PIDDLC

© National Library of New Zealand

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #185 on: December 23, 2017, 03:39:32 PM »
SERGEANT C. F. G.HUMPHRIES
HONOUR FOR A NEW ZEALANDER. - (FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.) , LONDON, 16th March. . There' is a New Zealand name in the list of warrant officers, non-commissioned officers, and men who have just been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field. It is that of Lance -Corporal (Acting- Sergeant) Cecil F. G. Humphries, of Christchurch, who is attached to the Ist Manchester Regiment, Indian Expeditionary Force. At the outbreak of the war, Mr. Humphries offered his services to the War Office, and was drafted to the Army Service Corps, with, which he went to Orleans about the middle of August. After a while, being anxious to get to the scene of action, he was able to obtain a transfer to the Ist Manchesters (Indian Expeditionary Force), though to make the change meant sacrificing the stripes he had earned in the A.S.C. However, promotion soon came, and lie was made lance-corporal on Christmas 1 Eve ; now he is acting-fiergeant. In Christchurch 'he is well known in football and golfing circles. So far he seems j to be the_ first New Zealander who has ' gained this coveted distinction. MANY 'CONGRATULATIONS It may be explained that Mr. Humphries and his mother, Mrs. A. R-. Rowse, of Mataura, came Home a year ago for a holiday. Directly war was declared, Mr. Humphries enlisted, as already stated, in the Army Service Corps. Mrs. Rowse, who is remaining in_ London for the time being, hae> received many congratulations on her son's success at the front. When the High Commissioner lieard the news he wrote to Mrs. Rowse : "You must be a proud mother that your son should, within so short a time, have come to the front. He is a credit to his family and an honour to his country.*' The medal was awarded for gallantry at tho Battle of Givenchy, on 20th and 21st December, when the Indian Force was_ hard pressed, but Sergeant Humphries only heard of his good foriunu on 28th February, when Brigadier-General Strickland pinm»d the, ribboti on his breast. The War Office record of the incident is : "For conspicuous gallantry and coolness at Givencny in the attack of 20th and 21st December, and for endeavouring to bring into cover the body of his company commander, who had been killed." Sergeant Humphries was wounded at tht: recent battle of Neuve Chapelle, and is now in hospital at Sevenoaks.

© National Library of New Zealand

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #186 on: December 23, 2017, 03:41:18 PM »
A BOOM IN RECRUITING RECORD DAY'S ENLISTMENT

Evening Post, Volume LXXXVIII, Issue 56, 3 September 1914, Page 7

A BOOM IN RECRUITING RECORD DAY'S ENLISTMENT

RUSH OF MEN FOR SERVICE. (Received September 3, 9.15 a.m.) LONDON, 2nd September. There are many indications of a boom in recruiting. In London the number of recruits on Monday was a record. Hundreds in Manchester were unable, to obtain medical examination, and marched in procession to the Town Hall and complained of the delay. The London Scottish Second Battalion now numbers 750. A third battalion will probably be necessary. Hundreds of the City of London Volunteers were obliged to join outside battalions. At Newport 583 recruits joined on Monday, making a total of 2561. Many companies are offering generous concessions to enlisting employees. Some grant full pay during service. A West Country bishop has inaugurated a movement for a Footballers' Legion. There is a movement' among ex-public school boys and university men to raise five battalions, increasing eventually to twenty. A hundred recruiting centres have been opened throughout the United Kingdom. One London centre enrolled 150 men in the first hour. Lord Kjtchener has 'approved the first battalion being attached to the. Middlesex Regiment.

© National Library of New Zealand

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #187 on: December 23, 2017, 03:42:12 PM »
Page 4 Advertisements Column 4

Evening Post, Volume LXII, Issue 153, 27 December 1901, Page 4
 
LOCAL AND GENERAL, ;?? — — — An alteration in the time-table for the San Francisco mail has been under consideration, but it has now been definitely decided that none shall be made. The steamers -will leave Auckland on Saturdays and San Francisco on Thursday, as at present. Lieutenant A. Rose (son of Captain Rose), who went away with the Sixth Contingent, is now ' an officer of the 3rd Manchester Regiment, stationed at Ald- ershot. Captain Rose's elder son, Lieu- tenant J. Rose, of the Fifth Contingent, is coming out to Australia by the Ormuz, and will probably reach Wellington next week. Mr. Samuel Brown, the employers' re- presentative on- the Arbitration Court Bench, is at present in Wellington. The Court will resume its Auckland sittings on the 6th January, and expects to be kept employed in the Northern city until the end of the month. Amongst other business which will be brought before it in Auckland will be a claim for compen- sation made against the Government by a co-operative labourer injured in the Upper Thames district. The Court will sit in New Plymouth after leaving Auck- land, and will then come on to Welling- ton, where more business requires its at- tention. , The Hon. T. Y. Duncan, Minister for Xands, nrrived from the South by the ftotonmhuna this . uorring,

© National Library of New Zealand

Timberman

« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 03:45:09 PM by timberman »

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #188 on: December 23, 2017, 03:48:31 PM »
THE PRINCE OF WALES' BIRTHDAY AT LADYSMITH.

Timaru Herald, Volume LXII, Issue 3114, 21 November 1899, Page 2
 
 
THE PRINCE OF WALES' BIRTHDAY AT LADYSMITH.

ANOTHER HOT ENGAGEMENT. THE RIFLE BRIGADE OCCUPY A BOER TRENCH. AND ASTONISH THE BOEBS, A COMPLETE ROUf. EIGHT HUNDRED BOERS KILLED. Received November 21at, 0.32 a.m. Durban, November 20. The Natal Times 1 correspondent at Lady smith reporta that on the 9th the Boers, covered by heavy shelling on the part of their artillery, occupied the kopjes and ridges adjacent to the British position on all sides. The attack waa the hottest between the jane tion of the Free State and the Newcastle railway lioea. The splendid fire of the Rifle Brigade,, the Johannesburg: Volunteers and the King's Rifles twice repulsed the tenacious attacks of the Boers. The Boers left a deep trench fronting the British unguarded, with the result that the Rifle Brigade occupied it unobserved, reserving their fire until the Boers readvanced. When they had reached the edge of the trench the rifles poured volleys into their ranks. This action astounded the Boers, who bolted, shells from the artillery completing the rout. Another section fired heavy shells until the concentration of the British artillery disabled their mortar. The Manchester Regiment repulsed the* third sectioa of the enemy. The British were victorious everywhere. It is estimated that the Boers lost 800 men. The lyddite bo terrified the Boers that the officers had to drive the gunners to their guns at the revolver's point. Received November 21st, 0.50 a.m. Durban, November 20. The Manchester Regiment on the 9th encountered at short range hundreds of Boers who were hidden m the dongafrom the lyddite shells. They inflicted great loss on them,
After the victory Sir G. White fired a salute In honour of the Prince of Wales' birthday, amid immense enthusiasm. SirG. White's sortie on the 14th provoked a big engagement. The Boers were driven from their guns and their position with great loss. There were few British casualties. Capetown, November 20. A Renter's message states that Mr Charchill was made a priaoner and sent to Pretoria. Ho is wounded m the hand. Twenty-six transports, with 27,000 men have arrived, including 9000 infantry and 18 guna intended Jor Durban and 1000 for East London. Borne of the prisoners at Pretoria are suffering from acurvy. They complain of the inferiority of the tinned meat. The New South Wales Lancers have arrived at Naauwpoort, where they were received with enthusiasm.

© National Library of New Zealand

Timberman
« Last Edit: December 23, 2017, 04:04:31 PM by timberman »

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #189 on: December 23, 2017, 04:09:38 PM »
His successor was George Miller who had been bandmaster of the 1st Life Guards since 1908. He was the son of Major George Miller, formerly bandmaster of the Royal Marines, Portsmouth, and grandson of Bandmaster George Miller of the Manchester Regiment.

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #190 on: December 23, 2017, 04:24:30 PM »
 A BATTLE-FIELD PICTURE.
Otago Witness, Issue 2394, 18 January 1900, Page 8
 
 
A BATTLE-FIELD PICTURE.
The Times correspondent describes with exceeding vividness how the Highlanders, supporting the Manchesters and Imperial Light Horse, scaled the hill at Elandslaagte : — Just as the latter reached the foot of the ridge, the storm, which had been threatening' so long, burst, and in a few moments everyone was drenched to the skin. The shower was sharp and short, but by the time it was over the Gordon Highlanders were among the stones which covered the cresl o£ the ridge. Dropping shots were falling' about them ; a couple of men were hit, another shot dead, and then the supports were into the firing line and filling wp the gaps in the line of the MnnoliAstAi- ?R*(ri T nAnt. fl.tirl t.hn T.iffht Hpftfl.
There was a short plateau to cross, then a saving dip, with a climb to the main plateau again. Cheerily the men responded to their officers, and wave after wave of kilts and khaki swept up to the sky line. r Here they wavered and dropped, for of the first sections only one in four could pass. A moment fioy checked — dead, wounded, and quick seemed sandwiched together among the boulders. Then their officers shouted them up. Ag-xia the sky line darkened with lines of men bent double. Again they seemed to meifc away ; still they were fed from below. And then all were over ; but not all, for 50 &lout fellows lay prostrate in the clefts of the rain-washed stones. And when the dip was passed, what a task lay before them ! They were called to face 600 yards of rough, rookstrewn open, intersected at intervals with barbed wire fences. At the end rose a kopje, which commanded the plateau from end to end, as a, butt would command a rifle range. No one could be seen, but all could feel that that final kopje was alive with small bore rifles. Stumbling forward among the clones, blundering over the bodies of their comrades as they fell before them, the men pressed on. It had ceased to be a moment for regimental commanders. Even sections could barely keep together. It was the brute courage of the individual alone that carried them on. Men stopped, lay under stones, and fired, were shot as they lay or rose from cover to rush another dozen yards. Men and officers were slaughtered in. batches at the fences. But here in. pliees the rain of bullets had done the work of wire-cutters. More than half way- was won, and yet, though the summit "of the kopje seemed one continued" burst of shrapnel, tho fire from it in no wise slackened. "It "seemed that the men had done all that could be done. Colonel Dick Cunyngham was shot- in two placas, half the officers of the Gordon Highlanders were down. The level crest seeme<l strewn with coimtless casualties. The critical moment had arrived. It v/as to be victory now or never. Colonel lan Hamilton ordered a bugler to sound the "charge." Out rang the bugle, such buglers as were unhurt took up the note ; Drum-major Lawrence, of the Gordon Highlanders, rushed out into the open and headed the line, playing the fatal ca.ll. The sound of the Devonshire bugles came up from the valley bottom, and the persistent rhythm of their firing gave heart to the flank attack. Waves of flittering bayonets danced forward in the twilight. Twenty determined men still held the final kopje. Again the bugles sounded the " advance," then tne " cease fire " rang out. There was a lull in iihe firing ; men stopped and stood ub clear of cover. In a moment the Boers re-opened and swept away a dozen brave men. But the dastardly ruse was a last and futile effort to save the day. Lieutenant Field, at the head of his company of the Devonshire Regiment, waa into the battery with the bayonet ; the men who had served the guns till the steel was 6ft away from them were shot or bayoneted. Devons, Manchester. Highlanders, and Light; Horsemen met and dashed for the laager in the dip below. It was a wild three minutes : men were shouting "Majuba!" Then m honest cadence the " ceas3 fire " sounded, th-^ pipes of the Gordons skirled the regiment?', quickstep, and we saw a sight which thrilied us all,' the white Sa.g fluttering from a Mauser carbine held by a bearded Boer.

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #191 on: December 23, 2017, 04:26:00 PM »
Mercury (Hobart, Tas.)     Monday 8 January 1917
MILITARY FOOTBALL MATCH.

AUSTRALIANS DEFEATED.
LONDON, January 7.
At Colchester yesterday the Manchester Regiment team beat the Australians
at Rugby football by 22 points to eight.
Gwynne and Huston scoured tries, and
Hannan converted one

Taken from the National Library of Australia

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #192 on: December 23, 2017, 04:26:44 PM »
Argus (Melbourne, Vic.)    Monday 27 March 1916

Anzacs at Football.
At Caterham (England) on Saturday a
New Zealand football team defeated the
Welsh Guards by 27 points to 0
A Manchester Regiment defeated a weak
Australian team at Colchester by 10 points
to nil

Taken from the National Library of Australia

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #193 on: December 23, 2017, 04:27:21 PM »
Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Monday 1 November 1920, page 7

Heroism in Mesopotamia.
V.C. for British Officer.
The Victoria Cross bas been awarded to
Captain George Stuart Henderson, D.S.O.,
M.C., of the 2nd Manchester Regiment, who
died fighting near Hillah, in Mesopotamia.
He saved the situation after having been
twice wounded.

Taken from the National Library of Australia

Timberman

Offline timberman

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4,884
  • you will not always get the answer you want
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #194 on: December 23, 2017, 04:28:05 PM »
Mercury (Hobart, Tas.), Monday 11 December 1916, page 8

RUGBY FOOTBALL
SOLDIERS AT PLAY.
LONDON. December 10.
At Rugby football yesterday the
Manchester Regiment team beat the Australians by 26 points. The Manchester Regiment
team is one of the strongest military teams in the country Gwynne and
Greenhaigh scored tries for the Australians, who had good forward players but
inferior backs
The New Zealand Postal Cor ps beat
Canada by three point to nil Johnston scored the try for the New Zealanders
near the finish of the game.

Taken from the National Library of Australia

Timberman