Author Topic: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment  (Read 5227 times)

Offline timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #150 on: July 02, 2017, 10:22:20 PM »
PLEASE NOTE
All of the information on this thread is taken from different sources most are copyright of groups or individuals, I have checked the use of sections on all the sites. I understand that if they are being used for non profit or non commercial use it is OK to put them on our site.
Please bear this in mind if you use any of the information on this thread.
Thank-you

If anything does infringe copyright let me know and I will gladly remove it.

I now have written permission to reproduce alot of the articles on this forum. The rest are covered by the statement above.

Neil (Timberman)



MEN CALLED UP.

HC Deb 22 December 1916 vol 88 cc1835-6W 1835W


 Mr. PERCY HARRIS (Paddington, S.)
asked the Under-Secretary of State for War whether he is aware that men are sometimes called up for military service and then sent back to their homes with instructions to report at a later data; whether in such circumstances the men are not entitled to military pay nor their wives to separation allowances although the men may have lost their civil employment; and, if so, whether he will issue such instructions as will prevent the continuance of this hardship?

 Mr. MACPHERSON
I am afraid that the terms of the question are rather general. I suggest to my hon. Friend that he should give me some specific instances, and I will have inquiries made.

© Parliamentary copyright

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #151 on: July 05, 2017, 10:12:53 PM »
ANIMALS DURING THE FIRST WORLD WAR

Description: A trench message dog of the 10th Battalion, Manchester Regiment stands on a sandbagged wall as he waits for a soldier (left) to complete the note he is writing, Cuinchy. One soldier (centre) pats the dog and holds him steady.

Period:First World War

Timberman

PS. The dogs name is Neil ;D

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #152 on: July 05, 2017, 10:14:02 PM »
THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME 1 JULY - 18 NOVEMBER 1916

2nd Lieutenant K C Macardle, 17th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, sitting on a bench with a dog. Lieutenant Macardle was killed in action on the Somme, 9 July 1916.

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #153 on: July 05, 2017, 10:20:41 PM »

North West Film Archive at Manchester Metropolitan University

Film no: 808 NEW COLOURS FOR 1st BN. MANCHESTER REGIMENT *1954
Producer: Army Kinema Corporation
b/w - sound - 16mm - 1m 30s

The Queen Mother reviews the 1st Battalion of the Manchester Regiment at Harrington Barracks, Formby - the presentation of the colours; the commentator relates the regiment"s history; a final royal wave to the camera.
 
Film no: 809 THE FAREWELL PARADE OCTOBER 8th 1929 1929
Producer: Unknown
b/w - silent - 35mm - 1m 16s

The farewell parade to Lt. Col. JR Heelis MC Commander of the 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment, at Alexandra Barracks, Maymyo, Burma - large assembly of soldiers, in tropical uniform, lined up at attention; flags are paraded and two mounted officers take the salute.

Film no: 2603 THE KING IN MANCHESTER 1934
Producer: Pathe
b/w - sound - 16mm - 6m 4s

Film of King George and Queen Mary"s visit to Manchester and Liverpool. The royal motorcade is seen arriving in St Peter"s Square Manchester. Various civic dignitaries greet their majesties - King George V inspects the Manchester Regiment while Queen mary inspects nurses from the territorial Army. George V addresses the crowds before laying the foundation stone for the Town Hall extension and opening the library (ceremonies not seen). Continues with footage of the royal motorcade arriving at Liverpool. Again civic dignitaries, soldiers and crowds are present. The king makes a speech and performs the official opening of the Mersey Tunnel. The royal motorcade drives through the tunnel and is greeted by crowds and soldiers in Birkenhead.

Film no: 2604 THEIR MAJESTIES PAY VISIT TO MANCHESTER 1934
Producer: British Paramount
b/w - sound - 16mm - 3m 41s

Film of the visit of King George V and Queen Mary to Manchester on 17th July 1934. The Royal motorcade arrives in a crowd-filled St Peters square. The King gives the Manchester Regiments 2nd Battalion a set of silver drums, presented by the City of Manchester . The King delivers a speech before laying the foundation stone for the Town Hall extension and opening the Central Reference Library.

Follow the link for good films on the Manchester's

http://www.britishpathe.com/search/query/manchester+regiment

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #154 on: July 16, 2017, 03:13:35 PM »
NATAL GOVERNMENT ON THE LOOK-OUT FOR TREASON.
Evening Post, Volume LVIII, Issue 48, 25 August 1899, Page 5
 
 NATAL GOVERNMENT ON THE LOOK-OUT FOR TREASON.
<.Received August 25, 9.30 a.m.) Capetown, 241.h August. In connection, with the allegation by the London Standard that widespread treason exists amongst the Boers in the Cape and in Natal, the Premier of Natal (Licut.-Col. A, H. Himo) states that the Government is endeavouring to discover and punish the traitors. London. 24th August. A thousand men belonging to the First | Battalion of the Manchester Regiment (formerly 63rd Foot) are leaving Gibraltar for the Cape ; also fifty members of tho Medical Corp

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #155 on: July 16, 2017, 03:15:22 PM »
THE CANADIAN ARMY.
Grey River Argus, 8 December 1906, Page 3
 
 THE CANADIAN ARMY.
 
london Dec. 6.
One hundred and fifty men of the disbanded Manchester Regiment have accepted the Canadian Government's offer to join the Dominion forces, with the prospect of ultimately settling on the land.


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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #156 on: July 16, 2017, 03:17:46 PM »
NEW ZEALAND FORGES.
Taranaki Herald, Volume LIV, Issue 13457, 22 June 1907, Page 5
 
NEW ZEALAND FORGES.
THE NEW ADJUTANT-GENERAL.
 
United Pres« Association — By Electrio Telegraph. — Copyright. (Received June 22, 9 a.m.) LONDON, June 21. Major Tuson, of the Manchester Regiment, has been selected as Adjutant- General of the New Zealand forces.
(Major Tuson was born in 1871. He is a D.5.0., and has seen a good deal of active service.)

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #157 on: July 16, 2017, 03:18:28 PM »
Major Tuson's Appointment
Bay Of Plenty Times, Volume XXXV, Issue 5076, 8 July 1907, Page 4

 Major Tuson's Appointment

The personnel of the Council of Defence set; up under the- Defence Act of last year has been completed -by the appointment 4 of Major Harry D. Tuson, of the Manchester Regiment. Speaking about Major Tuson's appointment, the Minister of Defence '(Sir Joseph Ward) said he toad had* [personal interview with? Major Tuson, and also with a number of other of' fleers who iwere tuetttioned f<k the I position. The- new Adjutant-General I was not oitly a smart and capable pflicer, but lie was also a comparatively young man, and that was a j thing to be considered. Heims bora -in 1866. and entered the army as lieutenant in the Border Regiment in 1886. He served in the Indies from that year until 1889, and then w«nt Home for three years. * Another period of three years (1892-4) he spent with the Egyptian Army, and in 1897 he entered the staff . college as a student. During 1899 and 1900 Major Tuson served with his regiment in South. Africa through the operations leading up to the relief of Ladysmith, including the actions of Colenso, Spion Kop, Tugiela, and Pjeters Hill. He continued in the field until July, 1900, when he returned Home. For his. services in South Africa he received the Queen's medal with live clasps. From 1901 to 1905 he was retained as adjutant of» volunteers, a-nd in the latter year he was pro^ moted to- his majority. Besides passji-ng the college, Major Tuson has a 'special certificate for the uiusketry I course at Hy the; and has passed, in •the Persian, French, and Russian
languages, and as an interpreter in Hindustani.* Captain M. t<ascelhis, who has been appointed a mounted infantry instructor, will arrive in the, course of a few weeks, and will stay in New .Zealand for two years. The otfceip iHljunted infantry Instructor is Lieutenant Charles kelson, whose regiment is now serving in India.

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #158 on: July 16, 2017, 03:20:41 PM »
Page 56 Advertisements Column 1
Otago Witness, Issue 2554, 25 February 1903, Page 56


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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #159 on: July 16, 2017, 03:35:38 PM »
AN UNLUCKY ENGLISH REGIMENT.
West Coast Times, Issue 3190, 20 June 1879, Page 3

 AN UNLUCKY ENGLISH REGIMENT.

(From the Washington Capitol.)
The recent fate of the 24th Regiment of the British line in Zululand is peculiarly melancholy. The regiment is nearly two hundred years old, having been originally embodied by William of Oransre in 1601, for service in the Flemish War and the Netherlands. Its records show a tour of service unsurpassed by any other regiment of the British army for variety and hard knocks, and it has always been unlucky. Its first experience was a disaster, being nearly annihilated at the battle of Steenkirke when it was hardly two years old. Subiequently it suffered out of all proportion to its comrades at Blenheim, Ramilies, Malplaquet, and was finally relieved and sent home, in the latter part of Queen Anne's war, in consequence of the impossibility of keeping its ranks recruited. Forty years afterwards it had an almost similar experience on the same ground, in the war of the succession, and still later, in the eighteenth century, it suffered immense losses, and was at last captured bodily in the Revolution. Returning to Enstlaud, it enjoyed only a few years of rest when it was sent to Egypt, and participated in Sir Ralph Abercrombie's operations, where its bad luck did not desert it. Then the regiment went to the Peninsula, where {it campaigned five years suffering, as usual, beyond all proportion. It was foremost in the storming of Ciudad Rodrigo and St. Sebastian ; in the defiles of the Pyrenees ; i» the forcing of the passage of the Bidassoa and the Nive, and in the battles of Nivelle, Orthes and Toulouse. It escaped Waterloo only by coming to America, after the first abdication of Napoleon, and participating in the operations which terminated the war of 1812 in humiliation to the arms of England. Then it was sent to India, where it had a hard round of service under Combermere, Hardinge, and Napier, suffering, as usual, excessively in the first Sikh war. It was no novice at the Cape either, for it had already borne the brunt of two Caffir wars aud bad done as much to establish British rule in that quarter as any other regiment that ever served there. In short England has had only one great war in nearly two hundred years in which the old 24th has not borne a hand . That one was the Crimean war, which it escaped chiefly on account of the sympathy at the Horse Guards for its unlucky tradition, and though it was on the roster for foreign service when the Crimean expedition was made up, another regiment was detailed to take its place, and it- was sent to one of the colonies. Finally, after nearly two hundred years of slaughter in every clime and in battle against every enemy of Eng land, civilized or barbarous, the 24th has been annihiliated by savages m South Africa.

The latest rendering of the proverb is : " People who live in glass houses, and who want to throw their arms around the girl, should pull down the blinds."

A letter picked up on a street in Manchester recently ran thus: — " Dear Bill doant kum to see me enny moar, for a wile enny way. Father has got awfully skeered about burglars,and he sets up every night with a double-barrelled shot gunn, watching the back yard. He put moren a pound evled into Smith's big nufoundland dog which Was kumming over the fens after a bone last night — The rose is red, the violet's blue, I wouldn't kum now if I was you— Yours as ever, Nancy."

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #160 on: July 16, 2017, 03:37:02 PM »
DEFEAT OF BEN VILJOEN.
Hawera & Normanby Star, Volume XVII, Issue 7264, 29 July 1901, Page 2
 
DEFEAT OF BEN VILJOEN.
Received July 28, 4.85 p.m.
London, July 27. Colonel Benson, on the 9th, fore* stalled Viljoen at Witpoort Bridge, commanding Dullstroom. The Boers were unaware that the bridge was held, and encountered a brisk fire, which oaused them to fall back in confusion. A hundred Boers in reserve, who attempted to prevent pursuit, were routed.
Yiljoen, later, abandoned 16 wagons. Colonel Benson', following unbrokenly for 25 miles, compelled a fight. The action took place at Olifant's River, the British killing six and wounding five of the enemy. The British casualties were few.
The following New Zealanders have accepted commissions: — Lieut. S. W. H. Crawford, in the Norfolk Regiment; A. B. Rose, Manchester Regiment ; R. M. D. Williams, York and Lancaster Regiment. Received July 28, 4.35 p.m.
London, July 27. Of the Seventh New Zealander*, Lieutenant Carter was slightly, and Privates G. W. Oallaway and Petersen severely, wounded at Vereeniging. Victorian Sergeant Buckingham was killed at Rhenoster Kop. A superior foroe, probably of Anister* dam and Pretretiep commandos, on Wednesday forced a detachment of Colonel Sternaoker's Horse to evacuate Breinersdorp, Swaziland. The British fought tb<eir way to Lembobo, 16 miles, losing ten killed and wounded, a few being missing. The Standard's Pretoria correspondent states that Colonels .Benson, Beat son, Spent and Parks, witla four columns, in the vicinity of Dulls iroom, awaited Ben Viljoen's 600 from Bhenoster-Kop going to Nelapruit. VUjoen was not aware that his advance was blocked. A battle was fought on the 7th, the enemy suffering heavy loss. General Ba<jen*Powell has arrived at Southampton, and was accorded an ovation. He said hiß work in South Afrioa was two-thirds finished, and that he would return the moment he bad recuperated.

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #161 on: July 22, 2017, 01:13:36 PM »
Page 5 Advertisements Column 3
Grey River Argus, 25 June 1915, Page 5
 
 
Alan Maxwell formerly of New-Ply- mouth, and .ex-light weight champion boxer of New Zealand has added to his pugilistic record the privilege of being the undefeated light weight champion of Egypt. Maxwell left New Zealand with the First Expeditionary Force, and in a letter to a friend at Hawera he relates successes in boxing matchos amongst the troops in Egypt "before going to the Dardanelles. Maxwell fought Kid James (9th Manchester Regiment, and a prominent boxer), and knocked out James in the third rouad. He/also had a match with Jones (ex- North of England champion), whom 1-e defeated in the seventh round. Max. avcll then challenged any man in Egypt of 10 stone or under, but left for the Dardanelles undefeated.

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #162 on: July 22, 2017, 01:15:12 PM »
The Fighting" on the 9th
Grey River Argus, Volume LVII, Issue 10386, 21 November 1899, Page 3
 
 
The Fighting" on the 9th
Very Hot
The Splendid British Fire
The Boers repulsed at all points
A surprise for the Boers
Astounded and Routed
The British victorious everywhere
The Boers lost 800
The Lyddite Shells terrify the Boers
Kept to their guns at Revolver's Point
Boers suffer great loss on 14th
Driven from theip guns and position
(Received November 21, at 0 32 a m) Durban, November 20. The Natal Times correspondent at Ladysmith reports that on the 9th the Boers, covered by heavy shelling on the part of their artillery occupied Kopjes and tidges adjaotnfc to tht British portion
ipn all sides and attacked. ? It was hottest between the junction o£:the Free State and Newcastle, railway lines. The splendid fire of the Rifle Brigade, the Johannesburg Volunteers and. the King's Rifles tn-ice. repulsed the fierce attacks of the Boers, who left; a deep trench fronting the British unguarded, with the result that the Rifle Brigade occupjed it unobserved, reserving! their fire until the Boers re-advanced they reached the edge of the trench the Rifles poured volleys into their ranks. The action astounded the Boers, who bolted, the shells from Artillery completing the rout Another section fired heavy shells until the concentration of the British artillery disabled a mortar. The Manchester Regiment repulsed a third section of the enemy. The. British were victorous everywhere. It is estimated the Boers lost 800. The fire of Lyddite shells so terrified the Boers that their officers had to drive the gunners to their| guns at revolver's point. The Manchester Regiment on the 9th encountered at short range hundreds of Boers hiding in a dor.ga from the Lyddite shells and inflicted great loss on, them. A After the. victory General i White -fifed a salute in honor of the Prince .of Wale's Birthday amidst immense enthusiasm; General. White's .sortie on the 14th provoked a big engagement. The Boers were driven from their guns and position with great loss. There were few British casulties.

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #163 on: July 22, 2017, 09:13:09 PM »
The Canberra Times, Friday 16 October 1936, page 4

ENGLISHMAN RULES
LONELY ISLE
Every evening at sunset the Union
Jack and an unknown flag carrying a
white seahorse on a dark-blue back
ground are hauled down to the sound
of a Boer War bugle on a two-acre
coral island in the seas, west of Sin-
gapore. It is the island of Palau
Serimbun-the tiniest "kingdom" in
the world, ruled by an Englishman
who does not want to return to
England.
Mr. W. A. B. Goodall, who was
born at Eccles, Lancashire, and later
lived at Bedford, went to the East
after he had served with the 1st Bat-
talion Manchester Regiment at Lady-
smith and other Boer War battles.
As an engineer he undertook Govern-
ment contracts in Malaya and then
joined the Johorc Government service.
At 57 he was "too old" for engineer-
ing jobs, He found that, after many
years m the tropics, he could not
live in England because his blood
had become too ' thin and the cold
made him miserable. He leased the
little island of 'Pulau Serimbun, a
pile of rocks and palm trees, from
the British Government, and established
his own kingdom. He has four
''subjects"-a Chinese who was educated at Cambridge,
two Chinese servants, and a Malay boatman. The
flag with the white sea-horse on the
dark blue background is the national
flag of Pulau Serimbun. With the
Union Jack it always flies from the staff near Mr. Goodall's bungalow,
perched on the peak of the island.

Taken from the National Library of Australia

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #164 on: July 22, 2017, 09:17:26 PM »
Taken from Wiki :)

W.A.B. Goodall
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
William Arthur Bates Goodall (1880-1941) was a former British soldier and engineer who achieved a period of popular renown as a voluntary castaway on the island of Pulau Serimbun in the Johore Straits west of Singapore during the 1930s. The island, only two acres in area, had been uninhabited for many years and was considered to be haunted. Goodall came to be regarded as a local Robinson Crusoe in Singapore, however when his story spread through the international press he became known as 'the ruler of the world's tiniest kingdom'.

Early life

William Arthur Bates Goodall was born in Eccles, Manchester in 1880 and was brought up there and in Bedford where he attended Bedford Modern School At the age of 16 he enlisted as a private in the First Battalion, the Manchester Regiment, and fought in the Second Boer War for which he was awarded the King's South Africa Medal and the Queen's South Africa Medal with 5 clasps. Goodall was present at the Defence of Ladysmith and later recalled that when the siege was finally broken by the British under Sir Redvers Buller, he 'sat down and wept for joy' when he was offered a cigarette by one of the relieving soldiers.

Civilian Life

The Regiment was drafted to Singapore in 1903 at which point Goodall, who didn't like the prospect of 'soldiering in the East', embarked on a civilian career. He spent some time in Sumatra and tried his hand at tin mining and tea planting. He secured a position with the Singapore Municipal Commissioners in the Water Department and was engaged on the construction of the Pierce, Gunong Pulai and Pontian reservoirs. He was also credited with the discovery of the Sembawang Hot Springs.
Pulau Serimbun
Goodall had been visiting Pulau Serimbun since the 1920s and had spent increasing amounts of his spare time there. When the contracts on the Singapore Reservoirs ended in 1932, he decided to live there permanently. He described the attractions of life as a castaway:
'Being a Robinson Crusoe is a delightfully peaceful existence for those who are not wedded to the pictures, the club, the hotel bar or a bevy of friends and acquaintances and for those who love nature'
He lived alone on Pulau Serimbun until 1935 before succumbing to loneliness and the rigours of maintaining the island. He engaged a Chinese employee to help him in practical and clerical matters and he was followed by other helpers, a Javanese and another Chinese. His story was given an added dimension by a Fleet Street journalist, H. Harvey-Day, who provided a few embellishments:
'Should you happen to sail past Pulau Serimbun at sunset-a most unlikely occurrence, as it is off the beaten track-the musical notes of a Boer bugle will float over the waves, and the Union Jack together with a mysterious ensign being a white horse impressed on dark azure background, will flutter slowly to the ground. Perhaps you will have the good fortune to observe Mr W.A.B. Goodall erectly saluting during this evening rite, for the island is his private kingdom...There he hopes to live peacefully to the end, ruling his four subjects, who are also his friends-a Chinese educated at Cambridge, two Chinese servants and a Malay boatman'.
The story appeared in the London Evening News and was picked up by other newspapers across the globe, leading to a spate of letters to Goodall from New Zealand, Germany, Britain and the United States
'Talking of correspondence reminds me of some very interesting letters which began to arrive in August last, addressed to Coral island in seas west of Singapore. These letters were of a direct consequence of a long and very inaccurate account of my life on the island which appeared without my knowledge in the Evening News, London. Some of my correspondents seemed to think we lived behind a stockade and spent our time beating off the attacks of savages. They exhorted me 'to keep the flag flying' and so on'
Goodall, whilst seemingly not adverse to the attention, was dismayed by some of the inaccuracies. He did, however, seem to accept a measure of jurisdiction: 'I've been dubbed the laird of Serimbun by the press, and as I'm the only authority on the island, with a staff of two Chinese and one Javanese, I suppose the title is a good one'.

Goodall and Singapore

Despite his geographical isolation William Goodall seems to have played a full part in the social life of Singapore. He corresponded regularly with Straits Times in matters relating to the natural history of Serimbu] He once picked up a Kapal Hantu, a Malayan 'Ghost Ship', which he donated to the Raffles Museum The Manchester Regiment continued to be stationed at Singapore and Goodall was always a prominent figure in the annual commemorations of Ladysmith. He appears to have been an excellent raconteur and he travelled to Singapore to give Radio talks, for example about his life on the island, 'An Amateur Robinson Crusoe', and once gave a broadcast of his reminiscences about the attack of SMS Emden during the Battle of Penang at which he had been an eye-witness.

William Arthur Bates Goodall died at the Johore Bahru Hospital in 1941 aged 61.

Timberman