Author Topic: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment  (Read 71856 times)

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #75 on: June 28, 2017, 05:35:02 PM »
PLEASE NOTE
All of the information on this thread is taken from different sources most are copyright of groups or individuals, I have checked the use of sections on all the sites. I understand that if they are being used for non profit or non commercial use it is OK to put them on our site.
Please bear this in mind if you use any of the information on this thread.
Thank-you

If anything does infringe copyright let me know and I will gladly remove it.

I now have written permission to reproduce alot of the articles on this forum. The rest are covered by the statement above.

Neil (Timberman)


FEMALE DEPENDANTS.

HC Deb 10 December 1920 vol 135 c2621W 2621W
 
Mr. ALFRED DAVIES (Clitheroe)
asked the Minister of Pensions whether in the case of a widower who is in receipt of a pension for the loss of a son and marries a widow who is also in receipt of a pension for the loss of a son they will forfeit their pensions?
 Major TRYON
The Royal Warrant provides that pensions granted to female dependants shall cease on marriage or re marriage, though a gratuity is in such event allowed equal in amount to 26 weeks' pension at the rate provided by the 1918 Warrant in liquidation of the State's liability.

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Timberman

« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:48:55 PM by timberman »

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #76 on: June 28, 2017, 05:35:26 PM »
TERRITORIAL ASSOCIATIONS (PENSIONS).

HC Deb 10 December 1920 vol 135 c2622W 2622W
 
 Lieut.-Colonel CAMPION
asked the Parliamentary Secretary to the War Office whether, in considering the question of reassessment for pensions of secretaries of Territorial associations, he will also, consider the case of other ranks who are pensioners and are employed by Territorial associations.
 Sir A. WILLIAMSON
Yes, Sir; the case of other ranks will also be considered. I can, however, make no promise of a favourable decision at this stage.

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Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #77 on: June 28, 2017, 05:35:52 PM »
PRE-WAR PENSIONS (REASSESSMENT).

HC Deb 10 December 1920 vol 135 cc2621-2W 2622W
 
 Brigadier-General WIGAN
asked the Secretary of State for War why pre-War pensioners who were civilian subordinates of the Army, and were compulsorily re tained in such employment, should not have their pensions reassessed and be granted the same gratuity as enlisted men performing the same work?

 Sir A. WILLIAMSON
Reassessment of pension is limited by the Royal Warrant to men who gave satisfactory re-enlisted service. As stated in answer to numerous questions in this House, I regret it is not possible to depart from the general rule.

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Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #78 on: June 28, 2017, 05:36:21 PM »
GALLIPOLI (CASUALTIES).

HC Deb 14 October 1915 vol 74 cc1494-5W 1494W

 Mr. OUTHWAITE
asked the Under-Secretary of State for War (1) whether he can state the casualties in Gallipoli; and (2) the casualties of the Australian and of the New Zealand forces in Gallipoli?
1495W
 Mr. TENNANT
I will answer this question and the next together. The casualties in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force up to the 9th October are:—
   Officers.   Other Banks.
Killed or died of wounds   1,185   17,772
Wounded   2,632   60,220
Missing   383   8,707
   4,200   92,699
Total   96,899   
Of these, the casualties in the Australian and New Zealand forces are as follows:—
   Officers.   Other Ranks
Killed or died of wounds   335   5,664
Wounded   814   20,180
Missing   52   2,076
   1,201   27,920
Total   29,121   

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Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #79 on: June 28, 2017, 05:37:25 PM »
NAVAL AND MILITARY PENSIONS AND GRANTS.

HC Deb 15 July 1918 vol 108 cc725-6W 725W

 Mr. SNOWDEN
asked the Financial Secretary to the War Office if he will inquire into the amount of pay and allowance now being given on account of Private H. Burns, No. 277580, 2/7th Manchester Regiment, who is now home out of hospital pending the fitting of an artificial foot, and who is being paid 11s. 1d. a week for Army pay and ration money and 9s. 4d. separation allowance for his wife; and, as this amount appears to be inadequate, will he see that this man is paid the sums to which he is entitled?

 Mr. FORSTER
Inquiries are being made into this case, and I will acquaint the hon. Member of the result in due course.

 Sir H. GREENWOOD
asked the Pensions Minister whether he can amend the Rule granting 2s. 6d. a week extra to recipients of the special campaign pension so as to make the increase apply to men over the age of seventy who are for some reason or other not eligible for the old age pension on attaining that age?

 Mr. FORSTER
No, Sir; the 2s. 6d. corresponds to the extra 2s. 6d. given to old age pensioners, and I fear I cannot adopt my hon. and gallant Friend's suggestion.

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Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #80 on: June 28, 2017, 05:37:52 PM »
HOME GUARD.

HC Deb 25 July 1940 vol 363 cc1007-8W 1007W
 
 Mr. Ammon
asked the Secretary of State for War why his promise that Mr. Jack Ward, V.C., would be reinstated in the Manchester Local Defence Volunteers has not been implemented?

 Sir E. Grigg
The extent to which the existing rule should be modified has been under consideration, and it has now been decided that an applicant whose father was not a British subject may be enrolled if he served in His Majesty's armed forces in the war 1914–18, or has satisfactorily completed a period of not less than three years on full pay in His Majesty's regular1008W forces. In no circumstances will an applicant be enrolled if, in addition to British nationality, he possesses German, Austrian or Italian nationality. Instructions to this effect will be issued shortly, and the question of Mr. Jack White's reinstatement will be dealt with accordingly.

 Sir F. Fremantle
asked the Secretary of State for War what arrangement is made for the medical care and treatment of men of the Home Guard when, on duty; and whether he has considered an offer by the secretary of the Central Medical War Committee to ask civil practitioners to undertake this duty as their contribution to home defence?

 Sir E. Grigg
Free medical care and treatment is provided for men of the Home Guard when on duty. It is proposed to take full advantage of the generous offer made by the Central Medical War Committee, for which my right hon. Friend is most grateful.

 Mr. Silkin
asked the Secretary of State for War whether a natural-born British subject, the son of non-enemy un-naturalised aliens, is eligible for membership of the Local Defence Volunteers?

 Mr. Eden
I would refer my hon. Friend to the answer given to-day to my hon. Friend the Member for Camberwell, North (Mr. Ammon).

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Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #81 on: June 28, 2017, 05:38:33 PM »
NAVAL AND MILITARY PENSIONS AND GRANTS.

HC Deb 20 November 1918 vol 110 cc3446-8W 3446W

 Sir J. D. REES
asked the Under-secretary of State for War whether he is aware that the wife of Private A. Fisher, 2nd Northumberland Fusiliers, has received no allowances though her husband has served over three and a half years, although application has been made to the War Office, the Pensions Department, and the paymaster at York?

 Mr. FORSTER
Separation allowance is not issuable for Mrs. Fisher as she was separated from and not supported by her husband prior to his enlistment, but allowance at the motherless rate is in issue for the child of the marriage.

 Mr. SNOWDEN
asked the Financial Secretary to the War Office if he will 3447W accelerate the decision in the appeal case for separation allowance of Miss M. Westhead, 5, Adelaide Street, Blackburn, dependant of Private G. Westhead, No. 97440, 52nd Grad. Battalion, Manchester Regiment?

 Mr. FORSTER
I will cause inquiry to be made, and let the hon. Member know the result.

 Colonel ASHLEY
asked the Pensions Minister whether he will consider the issue of a definite order directing local war pensions committees to pay the bonus due to a discharged man on completion of a course of training without any delay in cases where the committees are unable to find employment for him, and where his pension is insufficient to support him?

 Sir A. GRIFFITH-BOSCAWEN
Local war pensions committees have already been given definite instructions to pay the bonus in all cases immediately on the completion of the course. I am sending the hon. and gallant Member a copy of the Instructions.

 Mr. SNOWDEN
asked the Pensions Minister if there is a special attendance grant in cases where a discharged soldier in receipt of the full disability pension requires someone constantly in attendance upon him; if this grant is made through the local war pensions committee; and, in view of the fact that the local war pensions committees do not appear to be aware of this regulation, will he call their attention to it?

 Sir A. GRIFFITH-BOSCAWEN
A totally disabled soldier requiring a constant attendant may be granted a special allowance of an amount not exceeding 20s. a week. The award is made by the Soldiers Awards Branch, at Chelsea, on the recommendation of the local committees (or in blind cases, "St. Dunstan's"), who investigate the circumstances of the case, and report as to the amount which in their opinion should be granted. The local committees have had very definite instructions as to the principles which should guide them in making their recommendations, and I do not consider that any reminder is necessary.

 Mr. SNOWDEN
asked the Pensions Minister why the pension case of Private J. Davey, No. 6072, Loyal North Lancashires, has not been settled, seeing that this man has been missing since September, 1914, and the War Office,  by letter dated 28th September, 1915, said that steps were being taken to presume his death; and will he say why a delay of three years took place before the Minister of Pensions sent the form to the late soldier's mother?

 Sir A. GRIFFITH-BOSCAWEN
This case appears only now to have been brought to the notice of my Department. I am in communication with the regimental-paymaster and I will see that the case is speedily settled.

 Mr. G. LAMBERT
asked the Financial Secretary to the War Office if he has reconsidered the question of allowances to the wives of agricultural soldier substitutes?

 Mr. FORSTER
I regret that it has not been found possible to reverse the decision that separation allowance cannot be paid in these cases.

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Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #82 on: June 28, 2017, 07:40:32 PM »
One of the pages from the 7th Manchester sentry newspaper, Printed in Egypt


 'This item is from The First World War Poetry Digital Archive, University of Oxford © [Copyright notice]'.

Anyone is entitled to use the material for Educational Purposes (means for the purpose of education, teaching, distance learning, private study and/or research) but not for Commercial Purposes (i.e. selling or reselling the material or using it for any commercial gain).

 Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #83 on: June 28, 2017, 07:41:28 PM »
Page two from the 7th Manchester sentry newspaper,

'This item is from The First World War Poetry Digital Archive, University of Oxford © [Copyright notice]'.

Anyone is entitled to use the material for Educational Purposes (means for the purpose of education, teaching, distance learning, private study and/or research) but not for Commercial Purposes (i.e. selling or reselling the material or using it for any commercial gain).

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #84 on: June 28, 2017, 07:42:10 PM »
Page three from the 7th Manchester sentry newspaper,

'This item is from The First World War Poetry Digital Archive, University of Oxford © [Copyright notice]'.

Anyone is entitled to use the material for Educational Purposes (means for the purpose of education, teaching, distance learning, private study and/or research) but not for Commercial Purposes (i.e. selling or reselling the material or using it for any commercial gain).

 Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #85 on: June 28, 2017, 07:42:52 PM »
Page four from the 7th Manchester sentry newspaper,

'This item is from The First World War Poetry Digital Archive, University of Oxford © [Copyright notice]'.

Anyone is entitled to use the material for Educational Purposes (means for the purpose of education, teaching, distance learning, private study and/or research) but not for Commercial Purposes (i.e. selling or reselling the material or using it for any commercial gain).

 Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #86 on: June 28, 2017, 07:47:46 PM »
Title    
The 2/7th Manchesters
Author    
Unknown
Notes    
Coming down Menin Road from the trenches.
Item date    
27th December 1917
Creation place    
Menin Road, near Ypres, Belgium

The 2/7thBn 27th December 1917 on the Menin Road near Ypres Belgium


'This item is from The First World War Poetry Digital Archive, University of Oxford © [Copyright notice]'.

Anyone is entitled to use the material for Educational Purposes (means for the purpose of education, teaching, distance learning, private study and/or research) but not for Commercial Purposes (i.e. selling or reselling the material or using it for any commercial gain).

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #87 on: June 28, 2017, 07:49:04 PM »
This account comes from the history of “The Seventh Manchester’s July 1916 to March 1919 By Captain S. J. Wilson, M.C.”

This book along with the other 7thBn book With Manchester's in the East are avaliable as free downloads.

As far as the 7th was concerned November 6th was one of the most miserable and trying days ever experienced. In the middle of the morning we arrived at our position, where we stayed during the whole of the day in a bitterly cold rain with no possibility of shelter. When it was ascertained that the enemy had been dislodged we made a few fires and tried to restore life to our numbed bodies. The divisional commander, having seen our condition, and realising that very few in the brigade would be fit for fighting after two such days, ordered up the 125th brigade, who had had an opportunity of getting dry and warm. We marched joyfully back in the middle of the night to Le Carnoy and there spent two days in billets.

The advance of the 42nd was now rapid. Hautmont, a fairly large manufacturing town, was captured after street fighting, and by the evening of November 9th an outpost line had been established south-east of Maubeuge. The 7th meanwhile had marched up through the forest and were billeted in the small village of Vieux Mesnil.

Here we received official orders to stand fast on the morning of November 11th. At 11 a.m. the battalion paraded outside the church and there the bugles sounded "Cease fire" for the first and last time during the War. The men took the news very quietly. We were too close to actual events to give ourselves over to the mad demonstrations of joy such as took place in spots more remote. At the same time everyone experienced a curious feeling of calm satisfaction that an unpleasant task had been accomplished. The 42nd division had taken part in two great drives, the clearing of the Turk from British territory in 1916 and the clearing of the Hun from allied territory in 1918.”

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #88 on: June 28, 2017, 07:49:45 PM »
CENTRAL CHANCERY OF THE ORDERS OF KNIGHTHOOD.
St.  James's Palace, S.W.I.
12th September,  1946.
The KING has been graciously pleased to give orders for the following appointments to the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, in recognition of gallant and distinguished services while prisoners of war: —
To be Additional Officers of the. Military Division of the said Most Excellent Order: —

Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Barclay Holmes, M.C. (5904), The Manchester Regiment.

Timberman
« Last Edit: June 28, 2017, 07:53:17 PM by timberman »

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #89 on: June 28, 2017, 08:53:37 PM »
Captain Richard William Leslie Wain

Lt. (A/Capt.) Richard William Leslie Wain, V.C. 
25th. Bn. MANCHESTER REGT. att. to 'A' (LATER 1st.)  Bn. TANK CORPS
Richard William Leslie Wain was born on 5th December 1896 at 4 Victoria Square, Penarth, near Cardiff. He was the only son of Harris and Florence Emily Wain. The Wain family later resided at “Woodside”, the Avenue, Llandaff, Cardiff, his father being a Cardiff solicitor. He was educated at Llandaff Cathedral School and St. Bees School, Cumberland, where, in 1912 he joined the school OTC and was at camp when War was declared in 1914. In September of 1914, when he was 17 years old Richard Wain joined the 7th (Cyclist) Battalion of the Welsh Regiment (TF). In December of that year, he transferred to the 16th (Service) Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment (Public Schools). He was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant on 16 July 1915 and subsequently promoted to full Lieutenant a year later on 12 July 1916. Further promotion ensued with him being elevated to Acting Captain in November 1916. Wain served on the Western Front from March 1916 and was twice wounded. Because of his strong interest in mechanics and engineering, he then joined the Tank Corps. He was unmarried. At the time of his death he was with the 25th Battalion of the Manchester Regiment, attached to the ‘A’ (later designated 1st ) Battalion, Tank Corps. The account of his action is as follows:
During the Battle of Cambrai it was near the village of Marcoing where Capt. Wain, who was a section commander in ‘A’ Battalion, had gone into action in the tank of one of his lieutenants. When nearing the Hindenburg Support Line he spotted an enemy strong point which was holding up the advance of the infantry, and made straight for it. When almost on top a shell hit the tank and knocked it out completely. After the smoke and fumes had subsided Capt. Wain found of the whole crew only one remained alive, and he was in a terrible condition.
 Though seriously wounded himself, Wain crawled to the sponson door and looking out saw that the infantry were still being held up by the enemy strong point. He managed to find a Lewis gun and dashed from behind the tank and made straight for the strong point, firing as he ran. The Germans in the strong point, on seeing him bearing down upon them firing furiously at them, immediately  scattered. Half of them surrendered, the other half ran back, but Wain, his strength ebbing away, managed to find enough stamina to continue. Having used up all the ammunition in the Lewis gun he picked up a rifle that was lying nearby and fired at the retreating Germans until he himself was hit in the head by a bullet. The infantry had by this time moved forward, and stretcher bearers soon found Wain still assisting in the cleaning up of the strong point. His wounds were now streaming with blood and life was rapidly diminishing, but with an iron will refused to be attended to until he was satisfied the remaining Germans had been killed or had fled. He was taken to the dressing station but soon after died from his wounds. For this superhuman display of courage and resolution Wain was awarded the Victoria Cross. He was killed in the above action 20 November 1917.
 The Citation for this award from the London Gazette of 13th February, 1918 reads:
“For most conspicuous bravery in command of  section of Tanks. During an attack the tank in which he was, was disabled by a direct hit near an enemy strong point which was holding up the attack. Capt. Wain and one man, both seriously wounded, were the only survivors. Though bleeding profusely from his wounds, he rushed from behind the tank with a Lewis gun, and captured the strong point, taking about half the garrison  prisoners. Although his wounds were very serious he picked up a rifle and continued to fire at the retiring enemy until he received a fatal wound in the head. It was due to the valour displayed by Capt. Wain that the infantry were able to advance”.
Richard Wain is commemorated on the Llandaff War Memorial (Cathedral School Section), the Llandaff Cathedral War Memorial, the St. Bees School War Memorial and the Louverval Military Cemetery Memorial, Cambrai.


The Victor comic 1964

Timberman