Author Topic: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment  (Read 69785 times)

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #90 on: June 28, 2017, 08:54:39 PM »
PLEASE NOTE
All of the information on this thread is taken from different sources most are copyright of groups or individuals, I have checked the use of sections on all the sites. I understand that if they are being used for non profit or non commercial use it is OK to put them on our site.
Please bear this in mind if you use any of the information on this thread.
Thank-you

If anything does infringe copyright let me know and I will gladly remove it.

I now have written permission to reproduce alot of the articles on this forum. The rest are covered by the statement above.

Neil (Timberman)


The 63rd Foot was raised in 1757, the 96thFoot in 1824 and became the 1st & 2nd Battalions The Manchester Regiment in 1881
When first formed the badge was the city coat of arms but later the badge just had the plain fleur de leys which originated from the old 63rd Foot.
In 1942 the 1st Battalion was captured at the fall of Singapore, but a small party had departed earlier to England to form a new battalion to preserve the regiment, 370 men died in the POW camp.
The Colours are in Manchester Cathedral together with the memorials in the regimental chapel.
1958.09.01 amalgamated with 1st Bn, The King's Regiment (Liverpool), to form 1st Bn, The King's Regiment (Manchester and Liverpool)


Information found on this web site, British Armed Forces and National Service

Timberman
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:51:36 PM by timberman »

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #91 on: June 28, 2017, 09:08:07 PM »
George Stuart Henderson
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

George Stuart Henderson VC DSO & Bar MC (5 December 1893-24 July 1920) was a Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

He was 26 years old, and a captain in the 2nd Battalion, The Manchester Regiment, British Army during the Arab Revolt, Mesopotamia when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.
On 24 July 1920 near Hillah, Mesopotamia, Captain Henderson led his company in three charges against the enemy who had opened fire from the flank. At one time when the situation was extremely critical, the captain, by sheer pluck and coolness, steadied his command and prevented his company from being cut up. During the second charge he fell wounded but refused to leave his command and just as the company reached the trench, he was again wounded, this time mortally.

His Victoria Cross is displayed at the Museum of the King's Regiment in Liverpool, England.

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #92 on: June 28, 2017, 09:15:51 PM »
Update to the above post that was originally posted on February 22, 2009

THE VICTORIA CROSS AWARDED TO CAPTAIN GEORGE STUART HENDERSON HAS BEEN LOANED TO THE MANCHESTER REGIMENT MUSEUM.
14 December 2009

The family of Captain George Stuart Henderson, 2nd Bn, The Manchester Regiment, have decided to loan his Victoria Cross medal group to The Manchester Regiment Museum located in Ashton-under-Lyne.

The VC group had previously been on loan to the The King's Regiment which was formed in 1968 from the amalgamation of the King's ( Liverpool ) Regiment and The Manchester Regiment. The Regimental Museum now displays six of the regiment's Victoria Cross groups.


Medal entitlement of Captain George Henderson,
2nd Bn, The Manchester Regiment

    Victoria Cross
    Distinguished Service Order ( DSO ) & Bar
    Military Cross ( MC )
    1914 Star + clasp "5th Aug-22nd Nov 1914"
    British War Medal ( 1914-20 )
    Victory Medal ( 1914-19 ) + MiD Oakleaf
    General Service Medal ( 1908-56 ) & MiD Oakleaf
        1 clasp: "Iraq"

[ London Gazette, 29 October 1920 ], For the award of the Victoria Cross, near Hillah, Mesopotamia ( Iraq ), 24 July 1920, Captain George Stuart Henderson DSO & Bar, MC, 2nd Bn, The Manchester Regiment.

    For most conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice.

    On the evening of the 24th July 1920, when about fifteen miles from Hillah ( Mesopotamia ), the Company under his command was ordered to retire. After proceeding about 500 yards a large party of Arabs suddenly opened fire from the flank, causing the Company to split up and waver. Regardless of all danger, Capt. Henderson at once reorganised the Company, led them gallantly to the attack and drove off the enemy.

    On two further occasions this officer led his men to charge the Arabs with the bayonet and forced them to retire. At one time, when the situation was extremely critical and the troops and transport were getting out of hand, Capt. Henderson by sheer pluck and coolness, steadied his command, prevented the Company from being cut up, and saved the situation.

    During the second charge he fell wounded, but refused to leave his command, and just as the Company reached the trench they were making for he was again wounded. Realising that he could do no more, he asked one of his N.C.O.�s to hold him up on the embankment, saying "I�m done now, don�t let them beat you". He died fighting.

George Henderson's body was not recovered from the action and his name is engraved on the Basra Memorial, Iraq. Panel 31 / 64.

[ London Gazette, 3 July 1915 ], Awarded the Military Cross ( MC ), Near Ypres, Belgium, 26 April 1915, Lieutenant George Stuart Henderson, 1st Bn, The Manchester Regiment.

    Near Ypres on 26th April 1915, after his Company Commander had been wounded, he led his company up to within yards of the enemy's trenches with great gallantry and determination, and held on through several hours of daylight, and finally established himself there. Throughout the operations he set a fine example, after most of the senior officers had become casualties.

[ London Gazette, 31 May 1916 ], Created a Companion to the Distinguished Service Order ( DSO ), 8 March 1916, Lieutenant ( Temp. Captain ) George Stuart Henderson MC, 1st Bn, The Manchester Regiment.

    For conspicuous gallantry and determination in an attack on an enemy redoubt. On entering the redoubt he organised and led bombing parties which cleared out the enemy, of whom he personally shot five. He subsequently covered out withdrawal, and was one of the last to leave the redoubt.

[ London Gazette, 25 August 1917 ], Awarded a Bar to the Distinguished Service Order ( DSO ), Captain George Stuart Henderson DSO, MC, 1st Bn, The Manchester Regiment.

    For action on 9th January 1917

Timberman


timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #93 on: June 28, 2017, 09:19:26 PM »
From Find a Grave web site

George Stuart Henderson

Birth:       Dec. 5, 1893
Death:       Jul. 24, 1920
 
Arab Revolt (Mesopotamia) Victoria Cross Recipient. The Arabs, angered at what they perceived as their post-World War I betrayal by the Allies, as embodied in the Sykes-Picot Agreement which divided up the outer remnants of the former Ottoman Empire between France and Great Britain, rose up against the British occupiers, particularly administrators and civil servants. The conflict cost 2200 British and 10,000 Arab casualties before it was suppressed. Henderson was a native of East Gordon, Berwickshire, Scotland, and was serving as a captain with the 2nd Battalion of the Manchester Regiment when he performed the deeds for which he was awarded the VC.

From his citation:

"For most conspicuous bravery and self-sacrifice. On the evening of the 24th July, 1920, when about fifteen miles from Hillah (Mesopotamia), the Company under his command was ordered to retire. After proceeding about 500 yards a large party of Arabs suddenly opened fire from the flank, causing the Company to split up and waver. Regardless of all danger, Capt. Henderson at once reorganised the Company, led them gallantly to the attack and drove off the enemy. On two further occasions this officer led his men to charge the Arabs with the bayonet and forced them to retire. At one time, when the situation was extremely critical and the troops and transport were getting out of hand, Capt. Henderson by sheer pluck and coolness, steadied his command, prevented the Company from being cut up, and saved the situation. During the second charge he fell wounded, but refused to leave his command, and just as the Company reached the trench they were making for he was again wounded. Realising that he could do no more, he asked one of his N.C.O s to hold him up on the embankment, saying 'I'm done now, don't let them beat you.’. He died fighting." His body was not recovered.

His medals, including the Distinguished Service Order and Bar and the Military Cross,
are in the The King's Regiment Museum Collection at the Museum of Liverpool Life, Pier Head, Liverpool.

(bio by: Paul F. Wilson)

Burial::
Basra Memorial
Basra
Al Basrah, Iraq
Plot: No Known Grave; name is listed on Panel 31 and 64.



Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #94 on: June 28, 2017, 09:27:08 PM »
THE VICTORIA CROSS AWARDED TO PRIVATE ALFRED WILKINSON, 5TH BN, THE MANCHESTER REGIMENT, HAS BEEN SOLD AT AUCTION BY DIX NOONAN WEBB OF LONDON.

Medal entitlement of Private Alfred Wilkinson, 1/5th Bn, The Manchester Regiment


•   Victoria Cross
•   British War Medal ( 1914-20 )
•   Victory Medal ( 1914-19 )
•   King George VI Coronation Medal ( 1937 )
The Victoria Cross and WWI campaign medals awarded to Private Alfred Wilkinson of the Manchester Regiment, late Royal Scots Greys and Seaforth Highlanders, was sold at auction by Dix Noonan Webb on Thursday, 29th June 2006, for a hammer price of £110,000. The VC group was purchased on behalf of the Michael Ashcroft Trust, the holding institution for Lord Ashcroft's VC Collection.

After the outbreak of the First World War Alfred Wilkinson enlisted into the 2 / 5th Bn, The Manchester Regiment, at Atherton, in December 1914. Whilst still in training he was transferred, on the 27th January 1916, to the 18th Battalion and finally went overseas with this battalion on the 29th July 1916, being part of a draft of replacements for losses in the opening days of the Somme battle.
 
At some point Wilkinson was transferred to the 1 / 5th Battalion, The Manchester Regiment, probably in early 1918 when the 18th Battalion was disbanded, but his service papers do not disclose when this took place.
However, Alfred Wilkinson clearly excelled himself serving with his new battalion on the 20th October 1918, where he was to earn his Victoria Cross, eventually returning home to a hero's welcome at Leigh, Lancashire, in February 1919.

[ London Gazette, 9 January 1919 ], Marou, France, 20 October 1918,
Private Alfred Robert Wilkinson, 1/5th Bn, The Manchester Regiment.

For most conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty on 20th October 1918, during the attack on Marou, when four runners in succession having been killed in an endeavour to deliver a message to the supporting company, Private Wilkinson volunteered for the duty. He succeeded in delivering the message, though the journey involved exposure to extremely heavy machine-gun and shell fire for 600 yards.
He showed magnificent courage and complete indifference to danger, thinking only of the needs of his company and entirely disregarding any consideration for personal safety. Throughout the remainder of the day Private Wilkinson continued to do splendid work
Alfred Wilkinson was invested with his Victoria Cross by King George V at Buckingham Palace on the 22nd February 1919.

After Alfred Wilkinson was discharged from the Army with the rank of Lance Corporal he was employed by the Leigh Operating Spinner's Association, which body was subjected to adverse publicity when it was revealed Wilkinson's pay had been docked for the time he had taken off to attend 1929 VC Reunion Dinner in the House of Lords - he was duly reimbursed.

The renewal of hostilities in 1939 saw Wilkinson join the Home Guard and being appointed a Special Constable. At the time he was employed in the surveyor's laboratory as a tester at Bickershaw Colliery, but died as a result of gas poisoning at the colliery on 18th October 1940. At the subsequent inquest it was revealed that a sparrow had become wedged in a ventilation pipe thereby causing his death from carbon monoxide poisoning.

Alfred Wilkinson was buried with full military honours in Leigh Borough Cemetery.

Information from the Victoria Cross web site.

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #95 on: June 28, 2017, 09:32:14 PM »

Correction to the George Henderson post above.

Post by: Robert Bonner on February 23, 2009, 04:15:09 AM
________________________________________
George Henderson VC

His Victoria Cross and medals have never been in the museum of The King's Liverpool Regiment.

They are on permanent loan from the family and have always, since WWII, been kept with 1st Bn The Manchester Regiment and, since recent amalgamation, with 2nd Battalion the Duke of Lancaster's Regiment

Timberman


timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #96 on: June 28, 2017, 09:39:42 PM »
Victoria Crosses of the Manchester Regiment
1914-1918

SERGEANT CHARLES HARRY COVERDALE

11th BATTALION
THE MANCHESTER REGIMENT

4th October 1917 at Poelcapelle, France

He showed the utmost gallantry in approaching his objective. When close to it he killed an enemy officer and captured two snipers. He then rushed two machine-guns, killing or wounding the teams. He subsequently reorganised his platoon in order to capture another position, but after getting within 100 yards of it he was held up by our own barrage, and was obliged to return having sustained nine casualties.
Later he again went out with five men to capture the position and when he had gone some distance saw a considerable number of the enemy advancing. He withdrew his detachment man by man, himself being the last to retire, when he was able to report the enemy was forming a counter-attack. By his gallant leadership and utter disregard of danger throughout the attack, he set a splendid example of fearlessness to his men and inspired all with a spirit of emulation which undoubtedly contributed largely to the success of the operations.
 
Also received Military Medal 2nd November 1917 and was subsequently promoted to Second Lieutenant.
Died 20th November 1955.
Buried Egerton Cemetery, Huddersfield.

Taken from the TNA

Timberman

Update.

Huddersfield Town Hall, V.C. Memorial

Huddersfield Town Hall, V.C. Memorial to Pte E. Sykes V.C. and Sergeant Charles Harry Coverdale V.C., M.M.

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #97 on: June 29, 2017, 05:32:40 PM »
Victoria Crosses of the Manchester Regiment
1914-1918

PRIVATE WALTER MILLS

1/10th BATTALION
THE MANCHESTER REGIMENT

10/11th December 1917 at Givenchy, France

After an intense gas attack a strong enemy patrol endeavoured to rush our posts, the garrisons of which had been overcome. Although badly gassed himself he met the attack single-handed and continued to throw bombs until the arrival of reinforcements, remaining at his post until the enemy’s attacks has been finally driven off.
He died from gas poisoning whilst being carried away. It was solely due to his exertions, when his only chance of personal safety lay in remaining motionless, that the enemy was defeated and the line remained intact.
Killed in action.
Mills was buried at Gorre British & Indian Cemetery, Nr Bethune, Pas-De-Calais, France.
His VC Medal was buried with his Daughter Ellen, who died in the 1934


Taken from the TNA

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #98 on: June 29, 2017, 05:37:09 PM »
The Manchesters' Armistice

When the end of the First World War came on 11 November 1918, it was welcome release for all the soldiers fighting in France, Belgium and beyond, including the men of the Manchester Regiment, who had been hit hard by the four years of fighting.
 
Of the 42 battalions – known as the Manchesters - that had started the conflict, many had been disbanded or amalgamated elsewhere by late 1918, mainly due to the increasing number of casualties.
The regiment's most devastating moment had come a few short months earlier, during the last major German offensive of the war, in March 1918. The 16th and 17th battalions took part in what became known as 'The Battle Of Manchester Hill', when a huge German force attacked them near Saint-Quentin in France.
The soldiers fought bravely to defend their hill position, but were overwhelmed, and despite the 17th battalion joining the almost annihilated battalion late in the day, by the end of the battle, both sets of men had suffered a massive number of casualties.
 
At the eleventh hour
When the ceasefire finally came in November 1918, most of the remaining battalions were scattered around France.
The 2nd were near 'Manchester Hill' in the ruined city of Saint-Quentin. Being at the heart of the war zone, the place had been systematically looted and devastated – a staggering 80 percent of its buildings, including the impressive Basilica, were damaged.
They were not the only battalion to end the war at the front line – the 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th Battalions were further north, along what was known as the Hindenburg Line (a vast system of German defences in northeastern France), at Hautmont, when the news of peace came through.
Yet, not all the Manchesters finished their war in France and one battalion’s station reveals just how far the extent of the First World War was. Common thought places the conflict almost exclusively around northeastern France and, in particular, the Somme, but the war spread its grim reach much wider.
 

The 1st battalion finished the war in Palestine, fighting Ottoman troops. The Ottoman Empire had sided with Germany, Bulgaria and Austria-Hungary against the Allied Forces and so, just as in the muddy trenches of northern Europe, British troops fought in sun-scorched places like Palestine and Mesopotamia (now mostly Iraq).

A heavy toll

Celebrated as the Armistice was, the final cessation of hostilities brought mixed emotions for the men of the Manchesters, as the war had taken a heavy toll on the regiment.
The total number of soldiers of all ranks who were killed or died as a result of the conflict was 14,122, with around a further 31,000 being wounded or reported as missing in action.
Put in modern terms, that number would account for the entire population of Ashton-under-Lyne.
When you take into account the fact that the men of Greater Manchester also fought in the likes of East Lancashire and King’s Regiments (and thus took similarly proportional losses and causalities), there can be no doubt that the Great War had a huge impact on the area.

Thanks to Robert Bonner MA Captain (Retd), Chairman of the Museum of The Manchester Regiment for his help with this article

This was taken from the BBC site and with Captain Bonners permission put on here.Thank-you

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #99 on: June 29, 2017, 05:37:45 PM »
MILITIA EMBODIMENT—EXPENSES OF STATION CHANGES.

HC Deb 20 March 1900 vol 80 c1307 1307

 MR. YERBURGH

I beg to ask the Under Secretary of State for War whether he is aware that the officers and men of the militia regiments, which have been embodied and sent to take the place of regulars in garrison, have been put to serious expense, which many of them can ill-afford; and that, in consequence, while they are anxious to go to the front, and prepared to take their place in manœuvre camps, they are desirous not to be called upon to incur the charges which a change from one home station to another would entail upon them; and whether he can meet the wishes of these officers and men.

 MR. WYNDHAM

The Secretary of State for War is not aware of any complaints on the matter. He fully admits the necessity of putting the units concerned to as little inconvenience as possible, but he cannot undertake to promise that Militia regiments shall not be moved.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #100 on: June 29, 2017, 05:38:45 PM »
Taken from the Messenger Newspaper.

http://www.messengernewspapers.co.uk/news/1815382.the_chapel_street_story/#commentsform#commentsform

The Chapel Street story
11:28am Wednesday 7th November 2007
 
By Rick Bowen »


THERE was nothing special about Chapel Street in Altrincham when the First World War broke out. It was full of people who worked hard and played hard, usually at the nearby Rose and Shamrock Inn.
Families crammed into tiny two up and two down houses and the street was home to a vibrant Irish community. They had come to England to look for work and the building trade was a big employer.
Many of the inhabitants of the street worked as labourers, but it was also home to a shopkeeper and even a musician.
A number of lodging houses provided dirt cheap accommodation for the job hunters, with as many as ten of them sharing one room.
In fact, Chapel Street lives in local folklore as old Altrincham's Irish "colony". Most of the inhabitants struggled to make ends meet.
Things were about to change and this ordinary street would soon achieve extraordinary status.
When war broke out 161 men from 60 homes joined the army and King George V rewarded their valour by dubbing Chapel Street the bravest street in the country.
Fifty of the men who joined up paid the ultimate sacrifice for King and country.
But all of them were remembered when, on April 5, 1919, the Earl of Stamford unveiled a memorial outside All Saints Church.
According to the book, "Bygone Altrincham", the Earl said: "It was a proud and triumphant moment for Altrincham, but, at the same time, a sad and solemn one when they remembered that 50 of these men had given up their lives in their country's service."
The memorial was erected by public subscription.
Time has faded the names of the soldiers on the roll of honour but there are records of some of those who were killed in battle.
They include: Private William Bagnall of the Cheshire Regiment; Sergeant Thomas O'Connor of the Liverpool Regiment; Private Ralph Ryan of the Royal Lancashire Regiment; Private Joseph Booth (Jnr) of the Cheshire Regiment; and Private Albert Oxley of the Manchester Regiment.
Despite its reputation as a centre of valour, Chapel Street was pulled down at the beginning of the Second World War as part of Altrincham's slum clearance programme.
The plaque can now be found on the side of the Portofino Restaurant, formerly The Grapes Pub, on Regent Road in Altrincham.

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #101 on: June 29, 2017, 05:40:15 PM »
Taken from the Messenger Newspaper.

http://www.messengernewspapers.co.uk/features/traffordthroughtime/1815453.The_Chapel_Street_war_heroes/


The Chapel Street war heroes
11:37am Wednesday 7th November 2007

 

By Simon Greenhalgh »

TRAFFORD Through Time has obtained rare film archive of the day crowds gathered to honour a group of Altrincham men heralded by King George V as the "bravest street in the country".

A remarkable 161 men from 60 houses on Chapel Street joined the army when the First World War broke out in 1914.

It was a record number of volunteers from one street; 50 of them lost their lives.

Just five years later their remarkable Great War effort was recognised when the Earl of Stamford unveiled the Chapel Street "Roll of Honour" plaque on April 5, 1919.


The film - courtesy of the North West Film Archive - shows:

**Crowds cheering a procession of soldiers as they march through the streets of Altrincham.

**Staff standing outside the Altrincham Picture Theatre as a horse-drawn carriage passes by.

**The Earl of Stamford making a speech to the crowds as he unveils the Chapel Street plaque.

Chapel Street was pulled down at the beginning of the Second World War as part of Altrincham's slum clearance programme.

The plaque can now be seen outside the Portofino Restaurant, formerly The Grapes Pub, on Regent Road in Altrincham.


Timberman

PS. If you go to this link it will take you to the film  ;D

http://www.messengernewspapers.co.uk/news/video/time/32973/

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #102 on: June 29, 2017, 05:42:01 PM »
Taken from the Messenger Newspaper.

TRAFFORD THROUGH TIME
We shall remember them
11:00am Sunday 11th November 2007

By Chris Griffin »


REMEMBRANCE Sunday coincides with the 90th anniversary of the end of the 1917 British offensive in Flanders - from which some 400 men from Trafford did not return.
Research by local historian George Cogswell has unearthed the names of the Trafford servicemen who died in the bloody conflict.
Unlike the debacle of the first day of the Battle of the Somme - a British offensive in 1916 - when around 20,000 British and Commonwealth men were killed, most of them before breakfast, the first day of the 1917 offensive started well for the Allies - but it was not to last. Like the Battle of the Somme 1916, the Flanders offensive was a series of engagements, taking place over several months. Again like at the Somme, this one also ground to a halt in early November, as winter set in.
The offensive began at 03.10hours on the morning of June 7 1917, along the entire length of the Messines Ridge situated to the south of Ypres.
Nineteen huge underground mines were detonated blowing up thousands of German soldiers as they sat in their trenches. The sound of the explosions was heard in London and Eastern Counties.
Ten engagements comprised the Briitish offensive. They were: Messines, June 7 to 14; Pilkelm 31st July 31 to August 2; Westhoek, August 10; Langemark August 16 to 18; Menin Road September 20 to 25; Polygon Wood September 26 to October 3; Broodseinde, October 4; Poelcappelle, October 9; First Battle of Passchendaele October 12; Second Battle of Passchendaele October 26 to November 10.
George said: "The name Passchendaele is synonymous with totally waterlogged shell cratered ground as all the land drainage systems in this low lying area of Flanders had been destroyed in the shelling. It is impossible to describe the conditions that the Allied troops were fighting in - if they slipped off a duck-board they drowned - if they were wounded and slid into a crater, they drowned. Many that died there have no known grave, if they were not blown to pieces, they disappeared into the mud."
One hundred and ninety-five men from Altrincham, Partington and Sale died in Belgium during the offensive - and 101 have no known grave.
There were another 184 fatalities from the Stretford and Urmmston areas, of whom 61 have no known grave.
George added: "These figures only include those that actually died in Belgium, others would have died of their wounds in France being transported back to base hospitals and others would subsequently have succumbed to their wounds back in Blighty'.
"There are undoubtedly others that I have not yet been able to identify as having died in this offensive."
The largest British Commonwealth Cemetery in the world is at Passchendaele, in the Tyne Cot Cemetery at the village of Zonnebeke where 11,954 men are buried - 8,367 of whom are unknown.
The Tyne Cot Cemetery also contains the Tyne Cot Memorial to those men who died on or after August 16. The Menin Gate Memorial situated on the eastern side of Ypres contains the names of those who died in the area before August 16 At 8pm every night of the year, once the local Belgian Police have closed the road through the gate, at least two members of the Ypres Town Fire Brigade turn out to play the last post - a moving ceremony that is often attended by hundreds of people. The short ceremony has taken place since 1927, with the exception of during the Second World War, when it was deemed not to be politically correct and banned. The fire brigade buried their bugles to hide them from the occupying Germans and resumed the ceremony as soon as they left Ypres in 1945.


Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #103 on: June 29, 2017, 05:42:46 PM »
1st / 63rd Foot (West Suffolk) Regiment
1829 - 1833

The Regiment
Known as (nickname)................................................... " The Blood Suckers"
Facings............................................................................ DEEP GREEN
Braided Lace.................................................................. Silver
Service in Australia ....................................................... Tasmania & Sydney .
Commanding Officer.......................................................Lieut. Colonel J. Logan
 


The 63rd Regiment of Foot (West Suffolk)
In Australia 1829 - 1833 )
(A Work in Progress)
Unpublished manuscript by Edmund D.H. Flack © 2003

This Regiment began its military term in 1744 but was know only as the 63rd ( American )Regiment . In 1758 the Regiment was renamed the 63rd (West Suffolk) Regiment of Foot and retained this title until 1881.
The following is a history of many name changes.
1744.....63rd (American) Regiment of Foot
1758.....63rd (West Suffolk) Regiment of Foot
1881.....1st Battalion of The Manchester Regiment
Present.....Forms part of The King's Regiment
 


Taken from Rootsweb

Timberman

timberman

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Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« Reply #104 on: June 29, 2017, 05:43:14 PM »


1st / 96th Regiment of Foot
1839 - 1849

The Regiment
Known as (nickname)..................................................." The Bend Overs"
Facings...........................................................................Buff
Braided Lace..................................................................Gold

Service in Australia

 Throughout 1839 to 1841 the 96th Regiment acted as convict Guards at several locations. The Regimental Head Quarters of this Regiment was stationed in Windsor in 1841. In 1842 the Headquarters moved to Parramatta and then to Launceston in 1843. The Regiment remained in Tasmania until 1848 sailing to India in January of 1849.
Commanding Officer, Lieut. Colonel W. Hulme

The 96th regiment was broken into 26 separate detachments in 1839. These detachments began to arrive
in Australia during 1839, with the last detachment arriving in 1841. The headquarters for the Regiment was one of the last detachments to arrive in 1841.
This Regiment began its military term in 1760 in London but was know only as the 96th Regiment of Foot. The following is a history of the Regiments name changes.
1760.....the 96th Regiment of Foot.
1763.....Disbanded
1780.....Reformed the 96th (British Musketeers) Regiment
1783.....Disbanded
1793.....Reformed 96th (Queen's Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot
1798.....Disbanded
1802.....Reformed 96th (Queen's Own) Regiment of Foot
1803.....Renumbered 97th
1815.....Renumbered 96th.
1818.....Disbanded
1824.....Reformed 96th Regiment of Foot
1881.....Renamed 2nd Battalion of the Manchester Regiment
Amalgamation.....Now forms part of the King's Regiment
 
Battle Honors Prior to 1900

Egypt : 1801 , Peninsular : , New Zealand ;

96th Regiment of the British Army and while in Australia served on Norfolk Island (1840 to 1844) and in

New Zealand (1844 to 1847) and Tasmania (1847 to 1850).

 
Taken from Rootsweb

Timberman