Author Topic: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment  (Read 49359 times)

timberman

  • Guest
Snippets of the Manchester Regiment
« on: August 18, 2016, 10:46:25 PM »
Topic started by: timberman on January 13, 2009, 09:35:33 AM

Due to the amount of posts missing from the Snippets when the Forum was saved I decided to remove the topic
and redo it. As I already had it backed up as a word document and a PDF file, it will be
reproduced as the original. (Just take a bit of time)  :) :)

I'm starting this thread for bits of information that are found on the Manchester Regiment.
Most will not have any further information to go with the article, if they do we can split the posts and put them in the appropriate section  :)
I've also started using other bits of interest other than the Manchester's (this is a small amount)


Number 1 Taken from Parliamentary papers.


HILLAH FIGHTING (MANCHESTER REGIMENT).

HC Deb 21 October 1920 vol 133 cc1091-2W 1091W
 Sir W. SEAGER
asked the Secretary of State for War whether he is able now to supply the House with further information regarding the heavy casualties in July last to the Manchester Regiment in Mesopotamia?
 Lieut.-Colonel HURST
asked the Secretary of State for War what information he can give regarding the fate of the soldiers of the 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment reported missing in Mesopotamia in July 1092W last; whether there is any hope of their being alive; if so, where they are and how they are being treated; and if he has any information as to Lance-sergeant E. Fryer, No. 79581, and Private T. Howard, No. 88725, of the same unit, both reported missing?
 Mr. CHURCHILL
On 30th July, the General Officer Commanding, Mesopotamia, reported that a small column had been heavily attacked near Hillah on the 24th, and that a total of 205 British other ranks were "missing." The majority of these were understood to belong to the Manchester Regiment. On the 9th August, 78 non-commissioned officers and men of this regiment were reported as known to be prisoners in Arab hands. Subsequent reports as to the treatment of British prisoners have been to the effect that they were well treated by the Arabs. A report received on the morning of the 20th inst. stated that 79 British prisoners were brought in by the Arabs on 19th October and handed over to the 55th Brigade Column. No reports as to their condition have yet been received. The fate of the remainder of the missing men is unknown, and I regret that no further information has been received in the War Office concerning the two soldiers mentioned in the last part of the question by the hon. and gallant Member for Moss Side.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 09:49:49 PM by timberman »

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2016, 10:47:42 PM »
This one explains why some under aged soldiers are not released.

UNDER-AGE RECRUITS.

HC Deb 20 November 1919 vol 121 c1158W 1158W
 Mr. TYSON WILSON
asked the Secretary of State for War if he is aware that lads of sixteen and seventeen years of age are being accepted as recruits for the Army; and whether lads of this age are entitled to be released from the Army if their parents make application for their release and prove that their age is as stated above?
 Mr. CHURCHILL
The consent of the parents or guardian is required to the enlistment into the Army of any recruit under eighteen years of age. The Recruiting Regulations order that, whenever there is any ground for suspicion that a recruit is under the age mentioned, full inquiries are to be made before enlistment is approved, and the attention of recruiting officers has recently been drawn particularly to this Regulation. The reply to the latter part of the question is in the affirmative as regards lads under seventeen years of age. The discharge of soldiers over seventeen years of age who have mis-stated their age on enlistment is only authorised as a concession under certain circumstances. I would also refer the hon. Member to my replies to the hon. Members for Wigan and Springburn on the 10th and 10th November respectively.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2016, 10:48:44 PM »
UNDER-AGE RECRUITS.

HC Deb 10 November 1919 vol 121 cc62-3W 62W
 Mr. J. A. PARKINSON
asked the Secretary of State for War if he is aware that Private James Hurst, No. 77903, E Company, 19th Platoon, 1st Battalion, Manchester Regiment, Room 44, Salamanca Barracks, Aldershot, was not eighteen years of age when he enlisted on 1st August, 1919; that he only attained seventeen years of age on 28th December, 1918, and that a letter was sent to the War Office on behalf of the parents, and a reply received advising the parents to communicate with the headquarters. Preston, which they did, and sent his birth certificate with the letter, to which communication no reply has been received; is he aware that the father is in failing health, and there is also a mother along with a son aged twenty-two years, an imbecile, and a girl at school, Private Hurst being the main support of the home; and whether he will issue instructions for his early discharge from the Army, and also issue instructions that youths must not be enlisted unless they prove that they are eighteen years of age?
 Mr. CHURCHILL
The discharge of a soldier under eighteen years of age who mis-states his age on enlistment is only sanctioned in certain circumstances and as a concession. As regards the last part of the hon. Member's question, instructions on the point are contained in Recruiting Regulations, and special instructions on the subject have been issued on two 63W occasions recently. Every possible precaution is taken to avoid enlisting men under eighteen years of age, and I shall be happy to consider any suggestions for improving the system. The production of birth certificates by all recruits is impracticable. I am inquiring into the particular case mentioned, and will acquaint the hon. Member of the result as soon as possible.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2016, 10:51:14 PM »
LIEUTENANT DANKS, MANCHESTER REGIMENT.

HC Deb 30 July 1900 vol 87 cc19-20 19
 MR. BAINBRIDGE (Lincolnshire, Gainsborough)
I beg to ask the Under Secretary of State for War whether he is aware that Lieutenant Danks, of the Manchester Regiment, was mentioned in despatches relating to the battle of Elandslaagte on 21st October, 1899, and that those despatches were not published in the Gazette prior to his death, on 31st May, 1900, from the effect of wounds received in that engagement; and, in the case of such a death in a military hospital 20 in England, will he state whose duty it is to inform the relatives of the fact; and is it usual to send any intimation of regret from the War Office.
 *MR. WYNDHAM
Lieutenant Danks was not mentioned in despatches. His, parents were present at his death, and therefore it was not necessary to send any notification. The person responsible for notifying the death of an officer dying in a military hospital at home is the officer commanding the unit to which the officer was attached on being sent home.
 MR. SWIFT MACNEILL (Donegal, S.)
Was not this gentleman mentioned in the report furnished by his colonel?
 [No answer was given.]

© Parliamentary copyright


Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2016, 10:52:17 PM »
Hulme Barracks, Manchester.
HC Deb 24 March 1911 vol 23 cc866-7W 866W
 Mr. NEEDHAM
asked the Secretary of State for War whether Hulme Barracks, situated in South-West Manchester, are to be abandoned for use by the Regular Army; if so, when they will be vacated; whether he can say if they are to be afterwards 867W used for the Territorial Army; and, if so, whether the whole of the site now occupied will be so used, or whether any of it will be available for other purposes?
 Mr. HALDANE
There is no present intention of giving up Hulme Barracks, which are now in occupation. A portion of the barracks is not required for Regular troops, and it is in contemplation to make it available for Territorial units.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2016, 10:53:14 PM »

BRIGADIER-GENERAL CROZIER.

HC Deb 31 May 1921 vol 142 cc802-4 
12. Lieut.-Colonel GUINNESS
asked the Secretary of State for War if he will give the personal record of service in the Army of Brigadier-General Crozier, lately commanding the Auxiliary Division, Royal Irish Constabulary?
The SECRETARY of STATE for WAR (Sir Laming Worthington-Evans)
As the answer to this question is of a detailed nature I will, with my hon. and gallant Friend's permission, circulate it in the OFFICIAL REPORT.
Captain W. BENN
Is the right hon. Gentleman willing to give the personal record of any other officer whose name is put down on the Question Paper?
Sir L. WORTHINGTON-EVANS
If a question be asked, I will answer it.
 Lieut.-Colonel Sir S. HOAR
Was the personal record given to the Government of Ireland when General Crozier was appointed?
Sir L. WORTHINGTON-EVANS
I believe that the official record was given, but I am not absolutely sure.
Lieut.-Colonel GUINNESS
Will the right hon. Gentleman take steps to insure that when the Irish Office consults him as to the suitability of officers for police employment he will give them not only the official record but also the personal record of the officers concerned
Sir L. WORTHINGTON-EVANS
I can give the official record. That is all I can give. I cannot give personal records. It would be impossible for a Minister to give personal records which are complete and reliable. All I can pretend to do is to give the official records.

Captain BENN
Was the information which the right hon. Gentleman is going to give this House in his possession when he recommended General Crozier to this appointment?
Sir L. WORTHINGTON-EVANS
I did not recommend him. The official record, of course, was in the possession of the War Office and that is all I am giving. I am not giving any personal record. I am giving an official record.
Lieut.-Colonel GUINNESS
Is the whole of the trouble not due to the division of responsibility between the Adjutant-General and the Director of Personal Services? Will the right hon. Gentleman see that in future appointments, where the personal suitability of a man apart from War service is most important, the Director of Personal Services is consulted?
Sir L. WORTHINGTON-EVANS
I think that is rather a matter for argument. As far as the facts are concerned I am giving the official record, and of course I give the official record whenever I am asked for it in respect of an officer who is about to be employed.
 The following is the answer referred to:
 The official record of the services in the Army of Brigadier-General F. P. Crozier is as follows:—
 Born, 9th January, 1879.
 Served as Lieutenant in 4th Battalion, Middlesex Rifle Volunteers, 1896.
Served as Lieutenant in Militia, 1897, and as a corporal in Thornycroft's Mounted Infantry in the South African War.
 Obtained a commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the Manchester Regiment (from ranks of Local Military Forces, Natal), 19th May, 1900.
 Lieutenant, Manchester Regiment, 13th July, 1901.
 Employed with West African Frontier Force from 3rd June, 1901, to 17th September, 1905.
 To half-pay, 31st March, 1908.
 Resigned commission, 17th June, 1908.
 Commissioned as Captain, 3rd Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, 17th June, 1908.
 Resigned commission, 22nd May, 1909.
 War, 1914–1919.
 Commissioned Temporary Captain, Service Battalions, September, 1914.
 9th Service Battalion (West Belfast), Royal Irish Rifles.
 Temporary Major, Second in Command, 4th September, 1914.
 Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel whilst Commanding Battalion, 8th January, 1916.
 Temporary Brigadier - General, General List, 20th November, 1916.
 Commander, 119th Infantry Brigade.
 Relinquished appointment and temporary rank of Brigadier-General, 15th April, 1919.
 Lieut.-Colonel F. P. Crozier, temporary to Command 3rd Reserve Battalion, Welsh Regiment, 24th April, 1919.
 Ceased to Command 3rd Reserve Battalion, Welsh Regiment, 22nd July, 1919.
 Relinquished Commission and granted honorary rank of Brigadier-General, 31st July, 1919.
 Unofficial. — Attached Lithuanian Delegation, Paris. General Major Lithuanian Forces.
 War Services.
 South African War, 1899–1901.—Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17th to 24th January, 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5th to 7th February and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14th to 27th February). Operations in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6th to 9th June). Operations in Orange River Colony, May to 28th November, 1900, including actions at Wittebergen (1st to 29th July), and Caledon River (27th to 29th July).
 Operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 30th November to December, 1900.
 Operations in Cape Colony, December, 1900, to January, 1901. Queen's Medal with seven clasps.
 West Africa (Northern Nigeria), 1903.—Kano-Sokoto Campaign. Medal with clasp. Sokoto-Burmi operations.
The War of 1914–19.—Despatches "London Gazette," 4th January, 1917; 15th May, 1917; 11th December, 1917; 20th May, 1918; 20th December, 1918; and 5th July, 1919. French War Cross, C.B., C.M.G., D.S.O.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2016, 10:54:58 PM »
Reservists of Disbanded Battalions.
HC Deb 30 July 1906 vol 162 c444

 SIR CARNE RASCH(Essex, Chelmsford.)
I beg to ask the Secretary of State for War whether he can state approximately the number of reservists connected with the battalions which he proposes to disband.
THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR WAR (Mr. HALDANE,) Haddington.
Reservists are not ear-marked as coming from and belonging to any one battalion of a regiment, but are available for the regiment as a whole. The number of reservists of the regiments concerned are as follows:—Northumberland Fusiliers 1,364, Royal Warwickshire Regiment 1,534, Lancashire Fusiliers 1,449, Manchester Regiment 1,169.
 SIR CARNE RASCH
Will all the reservists of the disbanded battalions be treated in the same way as of those not disbanded?
 MR. HALDANE
Yes.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2016, 10:55:34 PM »
MANCHESTER REGIMENT (2ND VOLUNTEER BATTALION).

HC Deb 08 March 1897 vol 47 cc191-2 191
 MR. J. W. MACLURE (Lancashire, Stretford)
I beg to ask the Under Secretary of State for War when it is intended to appoint the new Adjutant for the 2nd Volunteer Battalion of the, Manchester Regiment?
 THE UNDER SECRETARY OF STATE FOR WAR (Mr. BRODRICK,) Surrey, Guildford
The appointment will be made as soon as a suitable candidate can be found. No officer in the territorial regiment is available at this moment.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #8 on: August 18, 2016, 10:56:19 PM »
MANCHESTER REGIMENT.

HC Deb 23 July 1915 vol 73 cc1816-7W

Mr. NEEDHAM
asked the Under-Secretary for War whether he can furnish information as to the condition of the men of the l/7th Battalion Manchester Regiment who are reported missing; and whether he has made use or will make use of the good offices of the American Ambassador to obtain full information in regard to each of the men who may be prisoners in the hands of the Turks, and thus allay the anxiety of their relatives who, up to the present, have been unable to obtain information?
 Mr. TENNANT
I have no additional information regarding the men of this battalion. The American Ambassador has been asked to make renewed application to the Turkish Government for full lists of prisoners.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2016, 07:28:17 PM »
DISCHARGED AS MEDICALLY UNFIT.

HC Deb 08 March 1917 vol 91 c581W 581W

 Mr. KING
asked the Under-Secretary of State for War whether he is aware that Private F. W. Allison, No. 17542, 20th Battalion Manchester Regiment, joined the forces on 17th November, 1914, and was discharged as medically unfit on 17th December, 1914, receiving Army Form B.2079, and that Allison is now being pressed again into the Army; whether the holding of Army Form B 2079 excepts the holder from liability to further service; and whether he will give orders that Allison is not to be called up?
 Mr. MACPHERSON
Inquiries are being made, and the hon. Member will be informed of the result.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #10 on: August 19, 2016, 07:29:22 PM »
pte 17642 frederick,william allison
20th manchesters
C.coy
enl 17-11-14 at manchester town hall
aged 27
warehouseman
discharged 17-12-14[with tuburculosis]
75 mytton st,hulme
parents charles+emily

mack  ;D

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #11 on: August 19, 2016, 07:30:37 PM »
MANCHESTER REGIMENT (DANIEL DEAN).

HC Deb 11 February 1926 vol 191 c1201 1201

 2. Sir JOSEPH NALL
asked the Minister of Pensions if he has inquired into the circumstances under which Daniel Dean, No. 4/2,848, Manchester Regiment, Pensions Reference 3 M.D. 4,645, came to leave hospital on Thursday, 28th January, and died at home on Sunday, 31st January; whether the deceased was in receipt of a disability pension at the date of his death, and what was the cause of the delay in awarding a pension which resulted in him being dependent upon the Poor Law for two years; and what provision is now being made for his widow?
 The MINISTER of PENSIONS (Major Tryon)
I find that the man referred to left the hospital of his own accord and contrary to advice, stating that he wished to go home, and that he had no complaint against the hospital. He was in receipt of a disability pension at the date of his death, this pension having been awarded on a claim made by him in March of last year. The Ministry had no knowledge of Dean's condition for some years prior to the making of his, claim, no application having been received from him during the period. With regard to the widow, a claim is, I understand, being made and will receive immediate consideration as soon as it is received.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2016, 07:31:45 PM »
MANCHESTER REGIMENT (REPAYMENTS).

HC Deb 06 August 1940 vol 364 c19 19

 38. Mr. Burke
asked the Secretary of State for War why non-commissioned officers of the Manchester Regiment, who were derated solely because Regular Army non-commissioned officers were drafted to the battalion, are having to pay back from their present privates' pay money which was paid them for acting as non-commissioned officers?
 Mr. Eden
I have ascertained that, in four of the five cases concerned, the soldiers have now been granted war substantive rank which cancels the over-issues. The fifth case is still the subject of inquiry, but I have given instructions that no recovery is to be made.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2016, 07:32:33 PM »
THE MANCHESTER REGIMENT AND THE LIMERICK MAGISTRATES.

 Deb 08 June 1893 vol 13 cc515-6 515

MR. O'KEEFFE (Limerick) I beg to ask the Secretary of State for War if his attention has been directed to a resolution passed on Friday last at Petty Sessions by the Magistrates of the City of Limerick, requesting the Commander of the Forces in Ireland to remove the Manchester Regiment from that city, and to send a better conducted corps to that garrison; and whether this request will be acceded to?

 THE SECRETARY OF STATE FOR WAR (Mr. CAMPBELL-BANNERMAN,) Stirling, &c. I understand that a resolution, which has not yet been received, to the effect stated in the question, was passed by three of the Limerick Magistrates, a fourth Magistrate who was 516 present on the Bench taking no part. Five men of this regiment have recently been convicted of larceny. But the police report that there has been no general misconduct on the part of the battalion, and that there is no bad feeling between the troops and the townspeople. The Commander of the Forces in Ireland sees no immediate reason for removing the 1st Manchester Regiment from Limerick.

 MR. THEOBALD (Essex, Romford) And how many of the three Magistrates wore appointed by the present Government?

 MR. CAMPBELL-BANNERMAN As to that I know nothing.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman

timberman

  • Guest
Re: Snippets of the Manchester Regiment (1-100)
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2016, 07:33:16 PM »
Camp, Salisbury Plain (Conditions)

HC Deb 22 November 1955 vol 546 cc1251-3 1251

 33 and 34. Mr. Hale
asked the Secretary of State for War (1) whether he is aware that the 9th Battalion, Manchester Regiment, served from 20th August to 3rd September at Windmill Hill Camp, Salisbury Plain, with inadequate food, unhealthy 1252 accommodation, and with insect-infested bedding; and what steps he proposes to take to prevent a recurrence of such conditions;
(2) if he will take disciplinary action against the officer or officers in charge of the conditions of camp, tents, bedding and catering arrangements at Windmill Camp, Salisbury, prior to the arrival of the 9th Battalion Manchester Regiment in view of the proved inadequacy of the arrangements.
 Mr. Head
I am not satisfied about conditions in this camp. General Erskine has been carefully into the matter and is determined to see that they will not recur.
 Mr. Hale
Is the Minister aware that he wrote to me and said that the complaints were exaggerated? I hope that I report him correctly, but it was certainly to that effect. Does he know that I have made inquiries of two other Oldham soldiers who served at that camp, and that they told me that the conditions were absolutely deplorable; that the blankets came out of earth and muck and straw, and that the men had only a blanket to sleep on on unprotected canvas as a result? One of them said that they were conditions in which he would not put a dog—[HON. MEMBERS: "Speech."] Mr. Speaker, on a point of order, may I call your attention to the fact that the Secretary of State for War sought leave of the House to answer two Questions together, and may I add that if I am to be barracked when I put a supplementary question to two Questions—
 Mr. Speaker
Order. In listening to the hon. Member I took into consideration the fact that an Answer was given to two Questions. I thought the hon. Member had, perhaps, exceeded the limits of a supplementary question to one Question, and that he was just on the point of exceeding the limit to two. I do not think there is anything to complain about in the remarks from the rest of the House.
 Mr. Hale
Is the right hon. Gentleman further aware that disciplinary action has been taken against one of the officers who told the Press that conditions were bad, and can he say what laws apply to that officer that do not apply to the ordinary soldier?

 Mr. Head
This is absolutely the first I have heard of any disciplinary action. I hope that the hon. Member will let me have any names and particulars that he has. It is certainly against my principles that that sort of thing should be done in the Army. As far as the camp is concerned, there are two aspects. First, I have admitted that the camp was not all that we would have wished it to be but, given rations and canvas, the success of a camp to a large extent depends on the unit, the commanding officer and the company commanders. I do not say that my Department is blameless in this case, but I think that the situation was made worse by certain members of these units not being administered very competently.
 Mr. Strachey
Would not the Minister agree that, in any circumstances, for blankets to be lousy—which is apparently admitted—is a disgraceful position to arise in an Army camp in peace-time?
 Mr. Head
That matter was gone into by General Erskine. I am informed that in the blankets there were a lot of what are called May bugs and that the bites were attributable to them and not to lice. No one actually found a louse, or produced one.

© Parliamentary copyright

Timberman