Author Topic: Manchester Grammar School Magazine  (Read 26163 times)

Offline Tim Bell

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December 1917 Manchester Grammar School Magazine Obituaries
« Reply #30 on: September 11, 2014, 08:13:20 PM »
http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1917_12.pdf
Private William Carter 6th Bttn
Puipl (1910-13) was killed in action near Ypres on September 6th. He was 20 years old. After leaving us he was on the staff of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Bank. A year ago he joined the 6th Manchester, which is the O.M. battalion, and after serving for a short time in Egypt was transferred with his division to the Western front.
CWGC
Rank:    PrivateService No:    251697Date of Death:    06/09/1917Age:    20Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     "A" Coy. 1st/6th Bn.Grave Reference:    I. C. 36.Cemetery:    AEROPLANE CEMETERYAdditional Information:    Son of William B. and Isabella Carter, of 28, Cavendish Rd., Chorlton-Cum-Hardy, Manchester.

Captain Horace B. Coomber 8th Bttn Att RFC
Pupil (1907-11), reported missing on October 12th and now reported killed on that date, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. W. H.
Coomber, of Prestwich Park. He came to us from Stand Grammar School, and went on to Manchester University. He was gazetted to the 8th Battalion Manchester Regiment in September, 1914, from the University O.T.C., was promoted lieutenant in July, 1915, and captain in June, 1916. A year ago he was attached to the R.F.C., obtaining his pilot's wings six months later. He was killed while fighting in the air over the German lines. A German airman dropped the news into the British lines three weeks afterwards. He was a most popular officer, says a comrade, and " did his very best right to the end, as he always did."
CWGC
Rank:    Captain Date of Death:    12/10/1917 Age:     23 Regiment/Service:    Royal Flying Corps     45th Sqdn. and "C" Coy. 8th Bn Manchester Regiment Grave Reference:    VI. E. 21. Cemetery:    DADIZEELE NEW BRITISH CEMETERY Additional Information:     Son of William Horace and Sarah Emily Coomber, of Glenholme, Prestwich Park, Manchester. Appointed Scout Officer, April, 1915, and Musketry Officer Nov., 1915. Volunteered for R.F.C. Oct., 1916.

Second-Lieut. Sydney John Davie 8th Bttn
Pupil(1905-10), ...was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Davie, of Timperley. On leaving the School he went to Manchester University, graduating B.A. (history honours) in 1913, and taking his M.A. degree in 1914. He was in the O.T.C. at the University, and after training at Bristol he received his commission in July, 1916, ... He had seen service in two theatres of the war, and been in some severe fighting. He was 24 years old. He had been captain of Broadheath Cricket Club. A fellow officer writes :—" He was always happy and smiling, and always had a good word for everyone. We feel that we have lost a good friend and a splendid officer, all the more to be admired because fighting and war was all against his principles, and he fought to end war if he could." His chaplain says of him :—" He leaves a memory and inspiration behind him. His modest bearing and his frank gentle ways endeared him to us all. Thank God we met him, and were helped by his bright clean youthfulness."
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    10/10/1917Age:    24Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     "C" Coy. 1st/8th Bn.Grave Reference:    IV. F. 5.Cemetery:    COXYDE MILITARY CEMETERYAdditional Information:    Son of John Philip and Hannah Davie, of 10, Hawthorn Terrace, Timperley, Cheshire.
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Offline Tim Bell

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Feb & April 1918 Manchester Grammar School Magazine Obituaries
« Reply #31 on: September 11, 2014, 08:40:13 PM »
http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1918_02.pdf
Second-Lieut. Kenrick Yorke-Jones
Pupil (1911-17) was the only son of Mr. H. Yorke-Jones, of Northenden. He was killed on December 26. When he left the school he was in the Modern VI, and had won an Exhibition for Modern Languages at Christ's College, Cambridge. At Cambridge he joined the Cadet Battalion, and went to France last September. He did well at school, both at work and game^ being a prominent member of the Lacrosse Team. He also did good work as a Scout and afterwards in the O.T.C., and at home worked for the Wesleyan Sunday School at Northenden. His sincere, unassuming nature and his gentle manliness endeared him to all who knew him, and no one leaves a more stainless record of devotion to duty and of goodness of heart.
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death    26/12/1917Age:    19Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment    17th Bn. Grave Reference:    VIA. A. 2.Cemetery:    POELCAPELLE BRITISH CEMETERYAdditional Information:    Son of Herbert and Leila Yorke-Jones, of "Leekhurst," Northenden, Manchester.

http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1918_04.pdf
Private Norman Barber 2/6th Bttn
(1908-10), whose parents live at Fairfield, after leaving us was clerk in a bank at Ashton-u-Lyne. He was 23 years of age.
CWGC
 Rank:     Private Service No:    47843 Date of Death:    10/10/1917 Age:    22 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     2nd/6th Bn. Panel Reference:    Panel 120 to 124 and 162 to 162A and 163A.Memorial:    TYNE COT MEMORIAL Additional Information:     Son of Mrs. Barber, of Fairfield, Manchester, and the late Harry Barber (Solicitor). Educated at Manchester Grammar School. Employee of The Lancashire and Yorkshire Bank.

Second Lieutenant William Bowker Farrington 6th Bttn
(1895-6) was the younger son of the late Mr. Roger Farrington, of Prestwich. After leaving the School he took up Law, and abandoned his practice as a Solicitor to join the Inns of Courts O.T.C. Upon Mr. Alfred Wood's removal to London, Mr. Farrington became the Hon. General Secretary of the Association, and. the keenness he had displayed for the Lacrosse Section was thus gained for the General Association. It will prove a very difficult matter to replace the disinterested service which he at all times gave so graciously and willingly.
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    25/03/1918Age:    37Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     6th Bn. Panel Reference:    Bay 7.Memorial:    ARRAS MEMORIALAdditional Information:    Son of Roger Farrington

Sergeant Arthur James Rupert Fernley Former 11th Bttn
(1908-11), Yorkshire Regiment, who has died in hospital, was the son of Mr. Fernley, manager of the Manchester and County Bank, Middleton. He won a scholarship at the Agricultural College, Holmes Chapel. He enlisted in the 11th Manchesters, fought at Suvla Bay, was invalided home with enteric, was wounded in France last September, and again on April 15th in the great battle.
CWGC
Rank:    PrivateService No:    35407Date of Death:    18/04/1918Age:    23Regiment/Service:    Yorkshire Regiment     1st/5th Bn. transf. from 11th Bn. Manchester RegimentGrave Reference:    III. E. 4.Cemetery:    LES BARAQUES MILITARY CEMETERY, SANGATTEAdditional Information:    Son of Arthur and Alice Ann Fernley, of "Redcroft," Rochdale Rd., Middleton, Lancs. Of West Didsbury, Manchester. Student at the College of Agriculture, Holmes Chapel, Cheshire.

Private William M'Cann 17th Bttn
(1909-10) 7, Balfour Road, Urmston, reported missing on August 31, 1917, now officially presumed killed, was educated at the School and Davyhulme School. He was in business with his father. His younger brother, Private Eric M'Cann, King's Liverpool Regiment, is reported to have died of wounds on August 26, 1917.
CWGC
Rank:    PrivateService No:    32493Date of Death:    31/08/1917Age:    21Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     17th Bn. Panel Reference:    Panel 120 to 124 and 162 to 162A and 163A.Memorial:    TYNE COT MEMORIALAdditional Information:    Son of Charles and Bertha McCann, of 7, Balfour Rd., Urmston, Manchester. Educated at Davyhulme. e Church School, Urmston, and Manchester Grammar School.

Captain (A/Major) John Edwin Rowbotham
2nd/7th Bttn
(1900-06) was the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Rowbotham, of Moston. He reached the Modern Sixth three years after entering the School, and he ended a successful School career by winning the Theodores Exhibition and the William Simpson Exhibition for Modern Languages at Manchester University, where he passed all his examinations with honours. He joined the Army at the beginning of the War, and had recently won the Military Cross. " As a boy he was full of energy and determination," writes one who knew him, " always cheery, a general favourite, and unspoiled by success. He was certain to make his way in the world, and to win many friends and honours."
CWGC
Rank:    Major Date of Death:    26/03/1918 Age:    31 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     2nd/7th Bn.Awards:    M C Grave Reference:    III. P. 20.Cemetery:     PERONNE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION Additional Information:     Son of Mr. and Mrs John Rowbotham; husband of Susie Rowbotham, of Rhosilly, Machynlleth, Mont. Born at Harpurhey, Manchester.

Second-Lieutenant Walter T. Thorp 1/7th Bttn
(1908-10) was the elder son of Mr. E. Thorp, of York Street, Manchester. He went as a private to Egypt at the beginning of the War, and fought in Gallipoli. He had served in France as an officer for a year, when he was killed in action on March 25th.One of our 1st O.M. Lacrosse Team.
CWGC
Rank:    Lieutenant Date of Death    28/03/1918Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     1st/7th Bn. Grave Reference:    IV. G. 3.Cemetery:    DOUCHY-LES-AYETTE BRITISH CEMETERY
« Last Edit: September 15, 2014, 07:28:04 PM by Tim Bell »
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Offline Tim Bell

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June-Nov 1918 Manchester Grammar School Magazine Obituaries
« Reply #32 on: September 15, 2014, 07:44:36 PM »
http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1918_06.pdf
Lieutenant John Donaldson, 8th Bttn att. Royal Warwick Regiment
(1908-12) had served in Egypt and Gallipoli with the Manchester Territorials. His parents live in Higher Broughton. His death was recorded in our last
number, and on June 3 it was announced that he had been awarded the Military Cross.
CWGC
Rank:    Lieutenant Date of Death:    25/03/1918 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     8th Bn. attd. 5th Bn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment Awards:    M C Panel Reference:    Panel 64 to 67.Memorial:    POZIERES MEMORIAL

Second-Lieutenant Arthur James Orr 24th Bttn
(1911-16) was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Orr, of Prestwich. He was killed in action, instantaneously, on April 23rd, while leading his platoon. His Captain writes : " To his brother officers, who feel his loss very keenly, he was a pattern of clean living, a man amongst men. He endeared himself to all who came within his gentle influence. Officers and men mourn the passing of such a perfect gentleman." At the School he was in the first football team, and was one of the best full backs that the School has ever had.
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    23/04/1918Age:    20Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     24th Bn. Grave Reference:    Plot 3. Row D. Grave 8.Cemetery:    MONTECCHIO PRECALCINO COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSIONAdditional Information:    Son of John J. and Elizabeth Orr, of Meadowbank, Prestwich, nr. Manchester.

Second-Lieutenant William Harold Parker, 7th Bttn Comm. to Worcestershire Regiment
(1906-10), joined the 7th Manchesters as a private in September, 1914, and went out to Gallipoli as Sergeant in July, 1915, where he served through the campaign until the evacuation. He was then appointed Company Quartermaster Sergeant and went with his Regiment to Egypt, where he took part in several brushes with the Turks. In March 1916, his regiment was drafted to France. After twenty-two months of active service he came home on his first leave, was recommended for a commission, and was gazetted to the Worcesters. He left for France on January 6th of this year, and, while leading his Company fell in action on April 26th, near Kemmel. The day before, he was awarded the Military Cross for gallant conduct in action on March 22nd. We are indebted to a friend for the following appreciation :—" His life was gentle; he was a devoted son and an affectionate brother, and had troops of warm friends; his worldly prospects were all that one might desire. And yet, animated by the glorious traditions of his old School, he was willing to sacrifice all the joys that surrounded him and responded promptly to the call of duty. No tribute to Harold Parker's fine character could better the words he wrote in his last letter home :— ' I'm getting tired of this business out here, but I've always got in mind that we are fighting for our King and Country, defending our nation and the homes of those we love.' "
CWGC
Rank:    LieutenantDate of Death:    26/04/1918Age:    25Regiment/Service:    Worcestershire Regiment     3rd Bn.Awards:    M CPanel Reference:    Panel 75 to 77.Memorial:    TYNE COT MEMORIALAdditional Information:    Son of Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Parker, of "Homeleigh," Flixton, Lancs.

Captain Samuel Francis Collier 6th Bttn
(1904-07), the eldest son of the Rev. and Mrs. S. F. Collier, of Victoria Park, who was reported wounded and missing on March 29th, is said to have been killed in action on that date, and though the information is not official, the War Office authorities believe it to be reliable. Captain S. F. Collier enlisted with his brothers in August 1914, and worked his way up very quickly to the rank of Captain. His youngest brother was killed on March 28th, the two brothers falling in action within one week.
CWGC
Rank:    Captain Date of Death    22/03/1918 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     6th Bn. Panel Reference:    Panel 64 to 67.Memorial:    POZIERES MEMORIAL

Captain George Thomas Ewen, M.C. 3rd Bttn (Poss Att. 5th)
(1891-2), who was killed in action at the assault on Kut in June, 1916, was at first reported wounded and missing, and for over a year it was hoped by his friends that he might be a prisoner, but the War Office now reports that his death must be presumed. The following extract from the Alpine Journal of February last, written by Philip S. Minor, was kindly supplied us by Mr. H. L. Joseland, H.M. of Bnrnley Grammar School :— " Ewen was born in 1879, and was educated at the Manchester Grammar School. On leaving, he took up journalism. Later he was for some years in the office of Mr. Cunliffe, now K.C. He entered at Gray's Inn in June, 1911, and was called to the Bar in 1913, obtaining the unusual award of a Scholarship of £100 for industry. While in London he was on the reporting staff of the Morning Post and Manchester Guardian. " Ewen joined the 3rd Manchester Regiment in 1914; was gazetted Second Lieutenant, and after a very short training went out to France, where he acted as Machine Gun Officer to the baftalion and to the Brigade. He was promoted Lieutenant in 1915 and Captain later in that year. " In the fighting at Neuve Chappelle he was awarded the Military Cross, and later was mentioned in despatches for his work at Ypres. Early in 1916 his regiment was ordered to Mesopotamia, and in the assault at Kut from the trenches* at Es Sinn he fell wounded (as was reported) in the leg and shoulder, but no trace of him has been found since. " Ewen was an original member of the Rucksack Club, and jokingly remarked to the writer that the experience gained in that Club was really responsible for his Military Cross, as his climbing practice enabled him to be quicker out of the trenches than men more accustomed to level ground. He edited the three reports and the first four issues of the Rucksack Club Journal, and indeed was mainly responsible for the existence of the Journal. " His first climb was made in 1902, and after 1906 he climbed mostly without guides, and usually leading. His holidays were always short, from two to three weeks, but his qualifying list of peaks and passes when he joined the Alpine Club in 1911 numbered about sixty. " The loss of Ewen is very widely felt. He made many friends in Manchester and London, and with his excellent abilities and power of concentration in everything he undertook he would have gone far at the Bar and also in his sport. He had a great love for the hills, and that this was not diminished by War conditions appears from one of his letters from Mesopotamia, where he writes that ' This country is only redeemed from absolute mediocrity by the fact that from our present camp one can see snow-covered hills forming the  Persian boundary eighty miles away.'"
CWGC
Rank:     Captain Date of Death:     08/03/1916 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment    3rd Bn. Awards:    M C Panel Reference:     Panel 31 and 64. Memorial:    BASRA MEMORIAL

Lance-Corporal C. W. Foster 19th Bttn
 (1913-16) died of wounds' on July 8th. His Captain writes that he was a candidate for a commission, and would have made a very good -officer. He had been told off to get experience of taking charge of men in the trenches, and had been doing quite well. At School he was in the O.T.C. He was the son of Mr. Albert Foster, of Accrington. He won the Belgian Croix de Guerre for great courage and devotion. Extract from report:—" East of Ypres, as a stretcher bearer, he showed conspicuous bravery and devotion to duty, in clearing wounded for fourteen hours, and in that he
went out on several occasions to fetch in wounded in face of heavy shell and machine gun fire, not ceasing in his effort^ till he was certain all were safe." He has on many previous occasions showed conspicuous gallantry in a similar capacity.
CWGC
Rank:    Private Service No:    40917 Date of Death:    10/04/1917Age:    21Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     19th Bn. Grave Reference:    L. "C." 873.Cemetery:    LEICESTER (WELFORD ROAD) CEMETERY Additional Information:    Son of Mr. E. Foster, of 40, Haddenham Rd., Leicester.

Second Lieutenant F. P. Elliott 1st Bttn
(1912-16), of Crumpsal, killed on August 23rd, left School to become a medical student at the Manchester University. His colonel says of him :—" He was an exceptionally eflicient and brave officer, a born leader of men."
CWGC
Rank:     Second Lieutenant Date of Death:    23/08/1918 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     1st Bn. Grave Reference:    I. J. 20.Cemetery:    SUCRERIE MILITARY CEMETERY, COLINCAMPS

Captain Basil Claude Hall 8th Bttn
(1905-10), was the only son of Ir. H. S. Hall, medical officer to the Leigh Union, of Railway Road, Leigh. He was learning the cotton business at Leigh when war broke out. He enlisted soon after hostilities began. A friend writes :—" He will probabl be best remembered as the jolliest of camping comrades; the rougher the time, the more he saw the fun of it, and he was always ready to do the dirtier work."
CWGC
Rank:    Captain Date of Death:    25/08/1918Age:    24Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     8th Bn. Grave Reference:    I. J. 9.Cemetery:    SUCRERIE MILITARY CEMETERY, COLINCAMPS Additional Information:    Son of Herbert Strange Hall and Jane Hall, of 56, Westbourne Rd., Birkdale, Southport. Native of Leigh, Lancs.

Privite Robert Ernest Jones 1/6th Bttn
(1907-10), Manchester Regiment, died of wounds in Fratce on September 3rd, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jones, of Nadine Street, Seedley, He won a Foundation Scholarship at the School from the Pendleton Higher Elementary School, and was 23 years of age.
CWGC
Rank:    PrivateService No:    250302Date of Death:    04/09/1918Age:    23Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     1st/6th Bn. Grave Reference:    VI. F. 9.Cemetery:    BAGNEUX BRITISH CEMETERY, GEZAINCOURTAdditional Information:    Son of William and Emily Jones, of 14, Nadine St., Seedley, Manchester.

Lieutenant Henry Norman Kay
 (1903-06), Manchester Regiment, is officially reported by the War Office "to have been killed in action in France on August 21st. He joined the Manchester Territorials in the autumn of 1914, received his commission in March, 1915, and took part in the Gallipoli campaign. On the evacuation of Gallipoli he was sent to Egypt for active service in the Sinai Peninsula. In February, 1917, he went with the 42nd Division to France. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. W. E Kay, of West Didsbury, and married, in 1915, Miss Thompson, of Old Trafford. Before joining the Forces he was employed at the Lancashire and Yorkshire Bank. In one of his last letters he wrote :—" If I knew that I should not come safely through I don't  regret having joined up in 1914 to fight for the cause of freedom, and would again do the same."
CWGC
Rank:    Lieutenant Date of Death:     21/08/1918 Age:     28 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment    7th Bn. Grave Reference:    II. C. 6.Cemetery:     QUEENS CEMETERY, BUCQUOY Additional Information:     Son of William Edward and Mary Alice Kay; husband of Ellen May Kay, of 2, South Drive, Chorlton-cum-Hardy, Manchester. Also served at Gallipoli and in Egypt.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2014, 09:59:02 PM by Tim Bell »
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Offline Tim Bell

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Manchester Grammar School - War Memorial Proposals
« Reply #33 on: September 15, 2014, 07:59:09 PM »
http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1918_07.pdf
The question of a War Memorial worthy to commemorate the part which Old Mancunians have taken in the War, and the sacrifices they have made, has been under the serious and sympathetic consideration of the Executive Council of the O.M.A., who have appointed a sub-committee to carry out the details of the following scheme. The object is to establish a fund for the following purposes :�
1. To enable the widow of any Old Boy, whose children have been orphaned by the War, to secure for her children (whether girls or boys) those educational advantages which their father was anxious to secure for them.
2. (a) T o place in the School a permanent and worthy Memorial commemorating all those Old Boys who have laid down their lives for their country.
(b) To provide a public Memorial which should be a record to after generations of the part that the Old Boys of the School had borne in the War.
3. To publish a book of remembrances containing the portrait and a brief record of the life of each of those who have fallen, and to present the nearest surviving relative with a copy of the book. (It was recommended that the first volume of this book should be put together at once, and a second volume published when the War comes to an end. C. L. Barnes, Esq., to act as editor. Copies shall also be available for purchase.)
It is estimated that at least �10,000 would be required for the first object, and that �20,000 should be the amount aimed at to carry out the whole of the suggested scheme. The Council confidently appeal to all who honour the Old School and its valiant sons to express by their unstinted
generosity their reverence, admiration and gratitude to those who have so nobly done their duty.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 05:23:47 PM by timberman »
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Offline Tim Bell

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Dec 1918 Manchester Grammar School Magazine Obituaries
« Reply #34 on: September 16, 2014, 09:59:55 PM »
http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1918_12.pdf

Corporal Edgar Brettell Causer
1/6th Bttn
(1910-11), was the son of Mr. W. B. Causer, St. Mary's Road, Higher Crumpsall. He was killed instantaneously by shrapnel on September 27th, as his division was assembling for attack near Havrincourt. Letters from officers and comrades say of him : " He was a splendid soldier and an excellent instructor and leader," " One of the stoutest and staunchest fellows one could wish to meet," " He had no thought of personal danger, and was always cheerful under the most trying conditions."
CWGC
Rank:    CorporalService No:    251253Date of Death:    27/09/1918Age:    22Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     "C" Coy. 1st/6th Bn. Grave Reference:    VII. E. 19.Cemetery:    FLESQUIERES HILL BRITISH CEMETERYAdditional Information:    Only son of Walter Brettell Causer and Alice Causer, of 16, St. Mary's Rd., Crumpsall, Manchester.

Private William John Corlett 12th Bttn
 (1910-15),  died in the Infirmary of a wound in the spine, received last March, which paralysed his lower limbs. He was the only surviving son of Superintendent Corlett, of the Fire Brigade. At School he took a prominent part in the Scouts and as a Camper. A friend says of him: " F e w fellows had so many friends; enemies he had none; he had far too much good nature. During all the time, over eight months, that he was in hospital he was cheerful and determined to get better." [Feb 1919] His old Scoutmaster writes as follows :—" We are proud to claim him as a member of our Troop. In his life he laid a ' trail' which can be followed with advantage by every true scout. His ' arrow-heads ' always pointed the way to duty—duty to his home, to his troop, and to his country. And now he has laid his trail and ' gone home '—called to Higher Service. We are thankful for the influence and example of his devoted and unselfish life, and shall honour his memory."
CWGC
Rank:    PrivateService No:    401151Date of Death:    03/12/1918Age:    20 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     12th (Duke of Lancaster's Own Yeomanry) Bn Grave Reference:    K. CE. 2112.Cemetery:    MANCHESTER SOUTHERN CEMETERYAdditional Information:    Son of Arthur R. and Eleanor Jane Corlett, of Fire Dept. Headquarters, London Rd., Manchester.

Lieutenant J. H. B. Darwin 8th Bttn Att R Warks R
(1894-96), Manchester Regiment, attached 5th Royal Warwicks, who was reported wounded and missing at Cambrai, in December, 1917, has since been reported to have died there in hospital behind the German lines. He was the son of Surgeon-Major G. H. Darwin, Medical Officer of the L. & Y. Railway. Lieutenant Darwin joined the University O.T.C. in 1915, whence he got his commission in the Manchesters, but all his service abroad was with the Warwicks. His colonel said he was a splendid soldier, and he was a great favourite with all his men. He leaves a widow and one small son.
CWGC
Rank:     Lieutenant Date of Death:    05/12/1917 Age:    36 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment      8th Bn. Grave Reference:    I. A. 36. Cemetery:    HONNECHY BRITISH CEMETERY Additional Information:    Son of Maj. and Mrs. Darwin; husband of Florence L. Darwin, of "Highfield," Newton Drive, Blackpool. Born at Manchester.

Second Lieutenant Kenneth A. Lodge 6th Bttn Comm LF
(1906-07), Lancashire Fusiliers, who has died in hospital, was the son of Mr. Charles Lodge, B.A., of Chorlton-on-Medlock, Manchester. He enlisted in the Manchesters, and was selected for a commission. He was wounded recently. His brother, Lieutenant R. N. Lodge, who was killed in action in 1915, was also in the Lancashire Fusiliers.
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    05/11/1918Regiment/Service:    Lancashire Fusiliers     4th Bn. Grave Reference:     Cemetery:    ECCLESTON (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD, CHESHIRE

Captain George Hugh Richardson, MC. (1890-95), 22nd Battn
who was killed in action in Italy on October 29th, was the youngest son of the late Rev. W. Richardson, rector of St. John's, Miles Platting, and of Mrs. Richardson, 44, Birch Lane, Manchester. He left the firm of Shaw, Butler, and Jardine in 1914, joined a Public Schools battalion, and served with the Royal Fusiliers in France during the following year. Obtaining a commission in 1916, he was posted to the Manchester Regiment, and served with the 16th and later the 22nd Battalion. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of a company in the action of Polygon Wood he was awarded the Military Cross. He subsequently went to Italy with the 7th Division, and was killed by almost the last shell which fell on the British front. His commanding officer writes of him as " a brave and excellent leader of men," and adds : " If it were possible for a man to get to a position he would always do jt, and his men knew it too."
CWGC
Rank:    Captain Date of Death:    29/10/1918 Age:    38 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment      22nd Bn.  Awards:    M C Grave Reference:    Plot 4. Row C. Grave 9. Cemetery:    TEZZE BRITISH CEMETERY Additional Information:    Son of The Rev. William and Mrs. Richardson, of the Vicarage, Poulton-le-Fylde, Lancashire.

Second Lieutenant Francis Gordon Scott, M.M. 1/5th Bttn
(1906-09), Manchester Regiment, killed in action on October 20th, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Scott, of The Knoll, Urmston. He joined the Public School Battalion in September, 1914, and won the Military Medal at the Battle of High Wood.
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    20/10/1918Age:    24Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     1st/5th Bn. Awards:    M MGrave Reference:    C. 23.Cemetery:    BELLE VUE BRITISH CEMETERY, BRIASTRE Additional Information:    Son of Harry Charles David and Rachel Scott, of 36, Queen's Rd., Urmston, Manchester.

Lieutenant Gordon Thorley 1/10th Bttn
(1907-10), who died on November 7th in France from wounds received in action, was the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Thorley, of North Shore, Blackpool. He was married, and was 23 years of age.
CWGC
Rank:    Lieutenant Date of Death:    07/11/1918 Age:     23 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     1st/10th Bn. Grave Reference:    E. 10. Cemetery:    FONTAINE-AU-BOIS COMMUNAL CEMETERY Additional Information:    Son of William and Emily Thorley, of Newton Heath; husband of Gladys Mary Thorley, of 675, Olham Rd., Manchester.

Lieutenant S. (Noel) Watts (1906-11), Manchester Regiment,
who has died in hospital of pneumonia, was the son of Mr. S. Watts, late of Edale, Derbyshire, and grandson of Mr. Samuel Watts, senior partner of Messrs.S. & J. Watts, of Portland Street. He was head of the Classical Sixth, and won a scholarship at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. He was at the end of his second year of residence when the war broke out. He enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion of the R.F., and was twice Wounded. A friend sends us the following appreciation :—" There is nothing but gratitude in every memory of Noel Watts, as we look back upon the way he lived his life and the way he laid it down. ... He sat in our Classical Sixth room day by day for three years under G. F. Watts' 'Aspirations,' a picture of the young knight with clear, unclouded brow, wide opened eyes, and mouth that tells of high resolve... He was not a camper, and had no love for roughing it in the open. He was cast in a quieter mould. An old Chaplain, in charge of the Venereal Disease Hospital, tells me that, when he goes to the Hospital, he says to himself, ' He descended into Hell.' I can think of no other terms adequate to express the utter revulsion which Noel Watts must have felt for the business of the war. The more honour to him that he came forward so promptly to do his duty as a man and a citizen...
CWGC - Not found.  Post war illness?

Lieutenant John Harold Webb
, M.C. 21st Bttn
{1904-05), was killed in action on October 9th. He was the son of Mr. P. Webb, of Prestwich Park. Before the war he was employed by Messrs. A. & S. Henry & Co. Joining the Public Schools Battalion in September, 1914, he was wounded at High Wood and again at Passchendaele, where he won the Military Cross.
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    09/10/1918Age:    28Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     21st Bn. Awards:    M CGrave Reference:    III. B. 26.Cemetery:    BUSIGNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSIONAdditional Information:    Son of Edwin Percy and Mary Webb, of Witherslack, Prestwich Park, Prestwich, Manchester.

Second Lieutenant Thomas Wilson
18th Bttn. Comm LNL
 (1910-13), was the son of Mrs. Wilson, of Langworthy Road, Seedley. He joined the Manchester Pals Battalion as a private, and was wounded at Montauban in July, 1916. His colonel writes : " He had already endeared himself to both officers and men. He died a noble death in hand-to-hand combat."
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    29/08/1918Age:    21Regiment/Service:    The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment     3rd Bn. attd. 2nd/4th Bn. Grave Reference:    V. D. 24.Cemetery:    H.A.C. CEMETERY, ECOUST-ST. MEINAdditional Information:    Son of Andrew and Agnes Annie Wilson. Enlisted 18th Bn. Manchester Regiment, Sept., 1914.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2014, 10:10:39 PM by Tim Bell »
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Offline Tim Bell

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1919-20 Manchester Grammar School Magazine Obituaries
« Reply #35 on: September 16, 2014, 10:17:48 PM »
http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1919_02.pdf

Captain John Reginald Houghton (1908-11), 6th Bttn att MGC
reported wounded and missing March 22nd, 1918, is now officially reported as having died from wounds at a German dressing station about that date. He was the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Houghton, 242, Oxford Road, Manchester, and was in his 23rd year.
CWGC
Rank:   Major Date of Death:    22/03/1918 Age:    22Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     6th Bn. Grave Reference:    I. K. 19.Cemetery:    ROISEL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION Additional Information:     Son of Edwin and Margaret Jane Houghton, of 242, Oxford Rd. Manchester.

Private John Aldred Stott 6th Bttn
(1907-09),  joined the Army at the beginning of the war, and was with his regiment in Gallipoli. He was invalided home in September 1915, since when, being unfit for over-seas duty, he had been on home service. He died of pneumonia when he was just about to be demobilised.
CWGC
Rank:    Private Service No:     2202 Date of Death:    04/02/1919 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment      transf. to (244525) Labour Corps Grave Reference:    T. 22.Cemetery:     FLIXTON (ST. MICHAEL) CHURCHYARD Additional Information:     Son of Maj. James Stott, V.D. and Mrs. Stott, of Abbotsfield, Flixton.

http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1919_04.pdf
Captain (Temp. Major) John Reginald Houghton 6th Bttn At MGC
(1908-11), who was reported missing' after the fighting at the end of March, 1918, has now been officially reported dead. It appears that he was severely wounded on March 22nd, taken to a German advanced dressing station at Vermand, near St. Quentin, and left there in an unconscious condition. A sergeant in his company, who was afterwards taken prisoner and returned from Germany recently, says he was with Captain Houghton all the day. " They were instructed to hold a village against the on-coming Germans, but had to fall back on an old church. Captain Houghton sent all men he could spare further back, and then had only thirteen men left. The position from the first seemed perilous and doomed. About 4 p.m. the Captain was grievously wounded in the pit of the: stomach by shrapnel, and soon became unconscious." The position was held till nearly midnight, but the sergeant being rendered unconscious by concussion, surrender became inevitable. The German officer in command spoke highly of their pluck and endurance, and had Captain Houghton removed to the dressing station, but he never recovered consciousness. He lies buried in a French civilian cemetery at Vermand.A letter from Major Potts says : " Houghton was one of the pioneer band that joined the School corps in its first term, September, 1910, and was one of its first N.C.O.'s. It was in the work of the corps, in which he was an enthusiast, that he first developed the steadiness and complete reliability which became part of him in later years, and the O.T.C. would never have been the success it became but for Houghton and his fellow N.C.O.'s, Macgregor, Butterworth and Whalley." His old form master, Mr. H. Nicholson, writes : " Houghton was always a somewhat shy and retiring boy, and many a casual observer failed to appreciate the sterling qualities of his character. But to those who knew him well he stood
revealed as the very soul of loyalty. He was not quick at book learning, but he had plenty of grit and determination, and by sheer perseverance often kept pace with more brilliant boys. Moreover, his word was his bond; you could trust him implicitly to carry out. anything he undertook to do."
CWGC
Rank:    MajorDate of Death:    22/03/1918Age:    22Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     6th Bn. Grave Reference:    I. K. 19.Cemetery:    ROISEL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSIONAdditional Information:    Son of Edwin and Margaret Jane Houghton, of 242, Oxford Rd. Manchester.

http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1919_07.pdf
Sergt. Charles Edward Cantrill 2/6th Bttn
(1893-97), Manchester Regiment, whose death was recorded in our April number, upon leaving the School continued his education at the Manchester School of Art, where he specialised in Decorative Art. He became articled to Meesrs. Goodall's, of King Street, Manchester, and spent the whole of his working life attached to their drawing office, of which office he ultimately became chief. AH his spare time was spent in the open, away from towns. He camped out for months at a stretch, coming in to business daily. Walking and climbing always
appealed to him ; and he was an enthusiastic member of the Rucksack Club. In 1912 he married Miss Dorothy Newell, left to mourn his loss with two children. At the outbreak of war he was a pioneer in the establishment of the Manchester Volunteer Regiment, wherein he became a captain. He was also the leader of a company of Special Constables. When it became apparent that men of his age were required for the Army he enlisted in the 2/6th Manchester Regiment (Territorials), with which Regiment he served in France as Sergeant. He was badly gassed at Nieuport in 1917, and spent several months in hospital at Etaples. Throughout the winter of 1917-18 he was on the St. Quentin front; and was fatally wounded there on the 21st March, 1918, dying at Le Chateau on the 2nd April, 1918 in a German hospital.
CWGC
Rank:    SerjeantService No:    252171Date of Death:    02/04/1918Age:    34Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     2nd/6th Bn. Grave Reference:    I. A. 28.Cemetery:   LE CATEAU MILITARY CEMETERYAdditional Information:    Husband of Mrs. D. Cantrill, of 716, Chester Rd., Strefford, Manchester

http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1920_02.pdf
Lieutenant Basil Tempest, 13th Bttn
 (1906-10), killed in action in May, 1917, on leaving School passed his Matriculation and entered the service of Messrs. Mather and Piatt as student
apprentice. In July, 1914, he gained a County Council Scholarship for the University. As soon as the war broke out he enlisted, but
was detained by the Authorities for training in the O.T.C. He received his commission in January, 1915, went out to France in July, and in the
following November to Salonica. " As the Senior Subaltern in the Company," writes Captain F. J. Taylor, " h e had the option of leading the
first wave of the attack on the Bulgar lines, and he jumped at the idea immediately. He guided and controlled his men across No Man's Land,
and was the first to enter the enemy trenches. For the rest of the night he was in charge of the advanced sentry groups and reconnoitring patrols.
Next morning at about 4-15, during a Bulgar counter-attack, he got up on the parapet, walked forward, firing a Very Light, to see how things were. A shell burst close to him, and he was mortally wounded."
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    25/04/1917Age:    24Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     13th Bn. Grave Reference:    E. 1117.Cemetery:    KARASOULI MILITARY CEMETERYAdditional Information:    Son of James and Louisa A. Tempest, of 1, Clarendon Rd., Whalley Range, Manchester.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2014, 06:32:03 PM by Tim Bell »
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Offline Tim Bell

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Re: Robert Horridge Obituary
« Reply #36 on: July 11, 2015, 08:52:17 PM »
A respectful obit for Lt Horridge is provided in pp 230-231  of the Dec 1914 edition. http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1914_12.pdf
A former member of Oxford OTC and employee of Parr's Bank, London he died on 17/11/14

"He died as a good comrade, a good citizen, would wish to die, raising by his death a glorious monument for himself, and leaving behind his memory for us as one of our most cherished possessions."
"Another man from the same [Finsbury] bank accidentally came across the grave of Robert Horridge, the first Parr�s man to be killed, and recognised the name from the staff magazine. He sent a message back for Horridge�s colleagues: �It may interest his friends at head office to know that I have seen his grave�at his head is a simple wooden cross with the inscription �Lieut Horridge, 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment. Killed in Action 17/11/14. RIP.�
Read more at http://www.rbsremembers.com/our-people/on-active-service/maintaining-pre-war-friendships.html#pr5hOAhUtdGXAQMT.99
« Last Edit: March 08, 2018, 05:25:00 PM by timberman »
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Offline mack

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Re: Manchester Grammar School Magazine
« Reply #37 on: July 12, 2015, 02:53:33 PM »
Lt horridges mother lived at 19 glade st,bolton,he worked in the general managers dept,london for parrs bank,he lived at "garthside",ducie ave,bolton
on the evening of 17th November 1914,he was looking up at a airoplane at wulverghem,when he was shot through the forehead
he was buried next to Cpl 512 p.faulkner who was killed the same day.

mack ;D

Offline mack

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Re: Manchester Grammar School Magazine
« Reply #38 on: May 05, 2019, 03:49:08 PM »
http://www.worldwar1schoolarchives.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/ULULA_1918_12.pdf

Corporal Edgar Brettell Causer
1/6th Bttn
(1910-11), was the son of Mr. W. B. Causer, St. Mary's Road, Higher Crumpsall. He was killed instantaneously by shrapnel on September 27th, as his division was assembling for attack near Havrincourt. Letters from officers and comrades say of him : " He was a splendid soldier and an excellent instructor and leader," " One of the stoutest and staunchest fellows one could wish to meet," " He had no thought of personal danger, and was always cheerful under the most trying conditions."
CWGC
Rank:    CorporalService No:    251253Date of Death:    27/09/1918Age:    22Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     "C" Coy. 1st/6th Bn. Grave Reference:    VII. E. 19.Cemetery:    FLESQUIERES HILL BRITISH CEMETERYAdditional Information:    Only son of Walter Brettell Causer and Alice Causer, of 16, St. Mary's Rd., Crumpsall, Manchester.

Private William John Corlett 12th Bttn
 (1910-15),  died in the Infirmary of a wound in the spine, received last March, which paralysed his lower limbs. He was the only surviving son of Superintendent Corlett, of the Fire Brigade. At School he took a prominent part in the Scouts and as a Camper. A friend says of him: " F e w fellows had so many friends; enemies he had none; he had far too much good nature. During all the time, over eight months, that he was in hospital he was cheerful and determined to get better." [Feb 1919] His old Scoutmaster writes as follows :—" We are proud to claim him as a member of our Troop. In his life he laid a ' trail' which can be followed with advantage by every true scout. His ' arrow-heads ' always pointed the way to duty—duty to his home, to his troop, and to his country. And now he has laid his trail and ' gone home '—called to Higher Service. We are thankful for the influence and example of his devoted and unselfish life, and shall honour his memory."
CWGC
Rank:    PrivateService No:    401151Date of Death:    03/12/1918Age:    20 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     12th (Duke of Lancaster's Own Yeomanry) Bn Grave Reference:    K. CE. 2112.Cemetery:    MANCHESTER SOUTHERN CEMETERYAdditional Information:    Son of Arthur R. and Eleanor Jane Corlett, of Fire Dept. Headquarters, London Rd., Manchester.

Lieutenant J. H. B. Darwin 8th Bttn Att R Warks R
(1894-96), Manchester Regiment, attached 5th Royal Warwicks, who was reported wounded and missing at Cambrai, in December, 1917, has since been reported to have died there in hospital behind the German lines. He was the son of Surgeon-Major G. H. Darwin, Medical Officer of the L. & Y. Railway. Lieutenant Darwin joined the University O.T.C. in 1915, whence he got his commission in the Manchesters, but all his service abroad was with the Warwicks. His colonel said he was a splendid soldier, and he was a great favourite with all his men. He leaves a widow and one small son.
CWGC
Rank:     Lieutenant Date of Death:    05/12/1917 Age:    36 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment      8th Bn. Grave Reference:    I. A. 36. Cemetery:    HONNECHY BRITISH CEMETERY Additional Information:    Son of Maj. and Mrs. Darwin; husband of Florence L. Darwin, of "Highfield," Newton Drive, Blackpool. Born at Manchester.

Second Lieutenant Kenneth A. Lodge 6th Bttn Comm LF
(1906-07), Lancashire Fusiliers, who has died in hospital, was the son of Mr. Charles Lodge, B.A., of Chorlton-on-Medlock, Manchester. He enlisted in the Manchesters, and was selected for a commission. He was wounded recently. His brother, Lieutenant R. N. Lodge, who was killed in action in 1915, was also in the Lancashire Fusiliers.
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    05/11/1918Regiment/Service:    Lancashire Fusiliers     4th Bn. Grave Reference:     Cemetery:    ECCLESTON (ST. MARY) CHURCHYARD, CHESHIRE

Captain George Hugh Richardson, MC. (1890-95), 22nd Battn
who was killed in action in Italy on October 29th, was the youngest son of the late Rev. W. Richardson, rector of St. John's, Miles Platting, and of Mrs. Richardson, 44, Birch Lane, Manchester. He left the firm of Shaw, Butler, and Jardine in 1914, joined a Public Schools battalion, and served with the Royal Fusiliers in France during the following year. Obtaining a commission in 1916, he was posted to the Manchester Regiment, and served with the 16th and later the 22nd Battalion. For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of a company in the action of Polygon Wood he was awarded the Military Cross. He subsequently went to Italy with the 7th Division, and was killed by almost the last shell which fell on the British front. His commanding officer writes of him as " a brave and excellent leader of men," and adds : " If it were possible for a man to get to a position he would always do jt, and his men knew it too."
CWGC
Rank:    Captain Date of Death:    29/10/1918 Age:    38 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment      22nd Bn.  Awards:    M C Grave Reference:    Plot 4. Row C. Grave 9. Cemetery:    TEZZE BRITISH CEMETERY Additional Information:    Son of The Rev. William and Mrs. Richardson, of the Vicarage, Poulton-le-Fylde, Lancashire.

Second Lieutenant Francis Gordon Scott, M.M. 1/5th Bttn
(1906-09), Manchester Regiment, killed in action on October 20th, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Scott, of The Knoll, Urmston. He joined the Public School Battalion in September, 1914, and won the Military Medal at the Battle of High Wood.
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    20/10/1918Age:    24Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     1st/5th Bn. Awards:    M MGrave Reference:    C. 23.Cemetery:    BELLE VUE BRITISH CEMETERY, BRIASTRE Additional Information:    Son of Harry Charles David and Rachel Scott, of 36, Queen's Rd., Urmston, Manchester.

Lieutenant Gordon Thorley 1/10th Bttn
(1907-10), who died on November 7th in France from wounds received in action, was the younger son of Mr. and Mrs. Thorley, of North Shore, Blackpool. He was married, and was 23 years of age.
CWGC
Rank:    Lieutenant Date of Death:    07/11/1918 Age:     23 Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     1st/10th Bn. Grave Reference:    E. 10. Cemetery:    FONTAINE-AU-BOIS COMMUNAL CEMETERY Additional Information:    Son of William and Emily Thorley, of Newton Heath; husband of Gladys Mary Thorley, of 675, Olham Rd., Manchester.

Lieutenant S. (Noel) Watts (1906-11), Manchester Regiment,
who has died in hospital of pneumonia, was the son of Mr. S. Watts, late of Edale, Derbyshire, and grandson of Mr. Samuel Watts, senior partner of Messrs.S. & J. Watts, of Portland Street. He was head of the Classical Sixth, and won a scholarship at Corpus Christi College, Oxford. He was at the end of his second year of residence when the war broke out. He enlisted in the Public Schools Battalion of the R.F., and was twice Wounded. A friend sends us the following appreciation :—" There is nothing but gratitude in every memory of Noel Watts, as we look back upon the way he lived his life and the way he laid it down. ... He sat in our Classical Sixth room day by day for three years under G. F. Watts' 'Aspirations,' a picture of the young knight with clear, unclouded brow, wide opened eyes, and mouth that tells of high resolve... He was not a camper, and had no love for roughing it in the open. He was cast in a quieter mould. An old Chaplain, in charge of the Venereal Disease Hospital, tells me that, when he goes to the Hospital, he says to himself, ' He descended into Hell.' I can think of no other terms adequate to express the utter revulsion which Noel Watts must have felt for the business of the war. The more honour to him that he came forward so promptly to do his duty as a man and a citizen...
CWGC - Not found.  Post war illness?

Lieutenant John Harold Webb
, M.C. 21st Bttn
{1904-05), was killed in action on October 9th. He was the son of Mr. P. Webb, of Prestwich Park. Before the war he was employed by Messrs. A. & S. Henry & Co. Joining the Public Schools Battalion in September, 1914, he was wounded at High Wood and again at Passchendaele, where he won the Military Cross.
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    09/10/1918Age:    28Regiment/Service:    Manchester Regiment     21st Bn. Awards:    M CGrave Reference:    III. B. 26.Cemetery:    BUSIGNY COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSIONAdditional Information:    Son of Edwin Percy and Mary Webb, of Witherslack, Prestwich Park, Prestwich, Manchester.

Second Lieutenant Thomas Wilson
18th Bttn. Comm LNL
 (1910-13), was the son of Mrs. Wilson, of Langworthy Road, Seedley. He joined the Manchester Pals Battalion as a private, and was wounded at Montauban in July, 1916. His colonel writes : " He had already endeared himself to both officers and men. He died a noble death in hand-to-hand combat."
CWGC
Rank:    Second LieutenantDate of Death:    29/08/1918Age:    21Regiment/Service:    The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment     3rd Bn. attd. 2nd/4th Bn. Grave Reference:    V. D. 24.Cemetery:    H.A.C. CEMETERY, ECOUST-ST. MEINAdditional Information:    Son of Andrew and Agnes Annie Wilson. Enlisted 18th Bn. Manchester Regiment, Sept., 1914.
ime surprised the students at Manchester grammar missed the rest of details of capt james watts when they compiled this roll of honour,he died in queen alexanders hospital,millbank,middlesex on 28-10-1918 aged 25,2nd manchesters attatched to 96th TMB,buried church of upper room,heaton Mersey

mack