Author Topic: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg  (Read 24132 times)

Offline wendyg

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2014, 08:14:31 PM »
Thanks Mack - what an interesting site!  I have some soldiers who were corporals and sergeants in the 18th, but not officers.  Thanks for this
Wendyg

Online mack

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2014, 08:48:47 PM »
your very welcome.

mack ;D

Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #17 on: February 24, 2014, 03:44:18 PM »
Scott, William James De Vere. 8th Manchesters
27th May 1890 – 29th May 1915. Son of James Scott of The Down, Trowbridge.  Educated Trowbridge High School, Bristol University and London University.
At the outbreak of war he was the Assistant History Master at the Elhamiah Secondary School, Cairo. Commissioned February 1915.

Killed in action. No known grave.  Commemorated on the Helles Memorial, Gallipoli.
Robert

Offline wendyg

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2014, 04:10:07 PM »
Thanks Robert 
I am particularly interested in this man for being the first  I have come across of a Wiltshire man in the Manchesters. Inwill do some research as to his appointment in Cairo
Wendyg

Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2014, 10:07:52 AM »
Wendy.
It will be most interesting if you can discover some more.
Robert
Robert

Online mack

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2014, 12:43:00 PM »
hiya Robert
there was a informative write up about him in bond of sacrifice,i don't have these publications but some of the gang on the GWF do,his three brothers all served and all three were also teachers,i do know he was captain of the trowbridge school cricket+football teams and rowed for London university,son of james+julia scott
one of his ancestors fought at waterloo

mack ;D

Offline wendyg

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2014, 05:52:35 PM »
Thanks for  that info Mack.  I will develop this further.  I just wonder why a  man in Wiltshire would be commissioned in the Manchester Regiment. 
most intriguing!
Wendyg

Online mack

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2014, 06:21:49 PM »
Thanks for  that info Mack.  I will develop this further.  I just wonder why a  man in Wiltshire would be commissioned in the Manchester Regiment. 
most intriguing!
Wendyg

that's easily explained wendy,they wanted to join the best regt in the british army ;)

mack ;D

Offline wendyg

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #23 on: February 27, 2014, 01:36:09 PM »
Nice one Mack! Agreed. 
Wendyg

Offline rendle1950

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2014, 03:11:18 PM »
A bit late but Lt George Swaine (19th Battalion) was a teacher at the Manchester Warehouseman and Orphans' School in Cheadle

Offline wendyg

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2014, 04:19:25 PM »
Thanks for  this. It's not too late at all and I have already looked him up on the census. 
 I know Cheadle Hulme well
wendyg

Online mack

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #26 on: March 21, 2014, 06:21:01 PM »
hiya wendy
google George Raymond swaine,theres quite a bit about him,and a couple of pictures.

mack ;D
ps and his service record on ancestry

Offline Pete Th

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #27 on: March 21, 2014, 07:32:24 PM »
wendy.
google this
bolton church institute school war memorial.

theres details and a photo of 2/Lt harry taylor of the 18th manchesters

KINGO.
hes one of your lads andy.

mack ;D

Mack, he's also one of mine. Harry was born in Bolton but taught in Cadishead. He was a very popular teacher and is named on the Irlam and Cadishead War Memorial. There is a great photo of him in A District at War.

Another teacher was 2nd Lt Leonard Harvey Nicholls, 21st Manchesters (also in District at War).

I'm about to go out but will post info on both men tomorrow morning.

Cheers
Pete
Remembering

Pte Sidney Lee (36719), 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regt - dow 18.02.17
Sgt Charles Roberts (13668), 11th Bn, Manchester Regiment - kia 18.05.18
Bombardier John Hesford (70065), 147th Heavy Battery, RGA dow - 04.09.18
Pte Sidney Lee (4131324), 8th Bn, Cheshire Regiment -  kia 12.03.41

Offline Pete Th

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #28 on: March 22, 2014, 07:14:53 AM »
From A District at War:

Leonard Harvey Nicholls – Killed in action 26th October 1917
Second Lieutenant Leonard Harvey Nicholls served with the 21st (Service) Battalion (6th City), The Manchester Regiment, 91st Infantry Brigade, 7th Division.

Leonard was born on 20th August 1887 in Manchester. He was the son of Thomas William and Elizabeth Lydia Nicholls of 127 Whit Lane, Pendleton. His father was a pharmaceutical chemist. Leonard was educated at Salford Secondary School for Boys and Birmingham University. Before the war he resided with his parents and was employed as a schoolmaster, holding the post of temporary headmaster of St John’s School, Irlam-o’th-heights, Salford.

On 6th November 1915, Leonard enlisted at Manchester into a Public School Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers. His description was recorded as 28 years 3 months, 5 foot 7½ inches tall, with a fresh complexion, grey eyes and fair hair. Two days after enlisting he joined the battalion at Epsom. On 10th December he was appointed Lance Corporal (unpaid), appointed Lance Corporal (paid) on 19th February 1916 and appointed Acting Corporal on 18th March. On 5th July he was confirmed to the rank of Corporal and appointed to the rank of Lance Sergeant. On 31st July he married Judith Garner, daughter of Joseph Garner of 595 Liverpool Road, Irlam. Her grandfather was a former headmaster at Irlam Endowed School.

On 31st August he was transferred to ‘C’ Company of the 105th Training Reserve Battalion (which was formerly the 29th Reserve Battalion, Royal Fusiliers). The 105th were stationed at Bruntsfield School in Edinburgh. On 18th September he was appointed Acting Sergeant. He submitted an application for a temporary commission on 16th October. On 1st December, his application having been accepted, he was posted to No. 2 Officer Cadet Battalion at Pembroke College, Cambridge. On 22nd June 1917 he embarked from Folkestone, arriving at Boulogne the same day. The next day he arrived at 30 Infantry Base Depot at Etaples and on 30th June he was posted to the 21st Manchesters in the field.

On 24th October 1917 the battalion moved to La Clytte and then later in the day to ‘Lock 8’ in preparation for an attack on Gheluvelt during the Second Battle of Passchendaele. On the night of 25th/26th October very heavy rain fell, especially during forming up, which made the ground extremely muddy and made movement very difficult. At zero hour, 5.40am, the barrage opened and the 21st Manchesters moved forward to get as close to the barrage as possible. The advance continued with accuracy and precision for some time but later ‘A’ Company on the left came under very heavy enfilading machine-gun fire from ‘Lewis House’ and the company was practically decimated. Around the same time, ‘B’ Company on the right, came under heavy machine-gun fire from ‘Berry Cotts’. Survivors of these two companies dug in as well as they could. It is believed that the survivors of ‘A’ and ‘B’ Companies later continued the advance, although they had lost touch with the creeping barrage. The official history of the 21st Manchesters states that ‘nothing is known of their fate and no trace could be found of them, although they were reported to have gone on.’ It has since been established that some men of ‘A’ Company reached their objective but, owing to their inability to use their rifles on account of mud, they were captured.

‘C’ Company moved off at zero hour, passing over Power Trench where elements of ‘D’ Company were found ‘mopping up.’ The advance continued until they came under severe machine-gun fire from ‘Lewis House’ which was so devastating that they were reduced to only four men.

Subsequently all available men from the 21st Manchesters, 2nd Queens, 1st South Staffs, 2nd Gordons and 2nd Borders were organised and established back in the trenches that had been their starting position in the morning. The 21st Manchesters were relieved by the 20th Manchesters at 2.15am the next day.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote the following about this attack in his ‘1917 Campaign’: ‘The 7th Division meanwhile had advanced upon Gheluvelt, the 2nd West Surreys, 1st South Staffs and Manchesters of 91 Brigade, advancing to the south of Menin Road in order to guard the flank of their comrades who followed the line of the road which would lead them to this famous village. The flanking Brigade was held up, however, at the old stumbling-block under ‘Lewis House’ and ‘Berry Cotts,’ where the German fire was deadly. This failure enabled the enemy to bring a very heavy cross fire upon the 2nd Borders and 2nd Gordons of 20 Brigade, forming the column of attack. In spite of this fire, the stormers forced their way into Gheluvelt, but found themselves involved in very heavy fighting, while their guns were choked with mud and useless, save as pikes or clubs. Under these circumstances they were forced back to their own line.’

As a result of the attack on Friday, 26th October 1917, the 21st Manchesters lost six officers including Leonard Harvey Nicholls killed in action and 27 other ranks killed, 173 wounded and 93 missing. Leonard was 30 years old. He is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial, Belgium and is also listed on the Birmingham University War Memorial, Old Salfordians Memorial (now located at the Peel Building in the University of Salford) and Salford Corporation Memorial (Education Department panel) sited in Salford Town Hall.

The Commanding Officer of the battalion wrote to Leonard’s wife stating her husband had been killed leading his platoon into action. He added ‘Your husband was an exceedingly keen and promising officer, and for some time had been looking after the games of the battalion in his spare time. He is very deeply missed by all.’ Medal Entitlement: Pair.
Remembering

Pte Sidney Lee (36719), 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regt - dow 18.02.17
Sgt Charles Roberts (13668), 11th Bn, Manchester Regiment - kia 18.05.18
Bombardier John Hesford (70065), 147th Heavy Battery, RGA dow - 04.09.18
Pte Sidney Lee (4131324), 8th Bn, Cheshire Regiment -  kia 12.03.41

Offline Pete Th

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Re: Teachers in the Pals for Wendyg
« Reply #29 on: March 22, 2014, 07:25:32 AM »
From A District at War:

Harry Taylor – Killed in action 12th October 1916
Second Lieutenant Harry Taylor served with the 18th (Service) Battalion (3rd City), The Manchester Regiment, 90th Brigade, 30th Division.

He was born in Bolton on 1st July 1889, the son of Henry and Anne Taylor of 13 Roseberry Street, Bolton. His father worked as a contractor and decorator. Harry had four older sisters who were all employed as cotton weavers: Ethelinda (born c. 1878), Mary (c. 1881), Florence (c. 1883) and Annie (c. 1885), as well as two younger siblings; Stanley (c. 1892) and Olive (c. 1894). Harry resided with his parents up to joining the Army and also lodged with Peter Ashton of Beechfield, Fir Street, Cadishead.

He was educated at Westminster Training College, London. He was employed as the assistant schoolmaster at the Cadishead Council School for over 10 years and also taught two evening classes per week. He enlisted on 13th February 1915 at Manchester into the 19th (Service) Battalion (2nd Public Schools) of the Royal Fusiliers as Private 6350. His service record states that he enlisted at the age of 25 years 7 months and described him as 5 feet 8¾ inches tall.

On 7th May 1915 he married Mary Elizabeth Horrocks (born 18th July 1890) at Bethel Chapel, Park Road, Westhoughton, Bolton. They went on to reside at 46 Bolton Road, Westhoughton.

Harry served a total of 274 days in England, between 13th February and 13th November 1915. On 14th November, he sailed with his battalion to France. The 19th Royal Fusiliers were part of 98th Brigade, 33rd Division. He served on the Western Front with this unit until 22nd March 1916 (a total of 129 days). On 23rd March 1916 he arrived back in England and the next day was posted to No. 1 Officer Training Battalion at Denham. On 5th April 1916 Harry and Mary’s only child was born in Bolton. He was named Harry Horrocks Denham Taylor (note the significance of the middle name).

On 6th July 1916 Harry was discharged from the Royal Fusiliers, with whom he had served 1 year and 145 days, and was granted a commission as second lieutenant with the 26th (Reserve) Battalion of the Manchester Regiment. In August 1916 he returned to France and was posted to the 18th Manchesters.

On 12th October the 18th Manchesters, in company with the 2nd Royal Scots Fusiliers and the 89th Brigade, attacked an enemy strongpoint south of the village of Ligny Thilloy (located on hills to the west of Bapaume). The enemy facing the attacking British were German Marines. At zero hour (2pm), after an ineffective barrage, the 350 Manchesters went over the top, leaving their trenches to cover the 300 yards to the German frontline. The Germans swept the British with heavy machine-gun fire and this, together with a fierce enemy counter-barrage, cost the Manchesters dearly with 250 men being killed, wounded or missing. Second Lieutenant Harry Taylor was one of those killed in action during this attack. He was 26 years old.

Mr R.B. Toft, chairman of the Education Committee at the time of Harry Taylor’s appointment to the school, and an old friend, said that he was ‘a most successful teacher and was respected, almost loved, by the scholars under his care.’ Mr Toft stated that Harry had been sent to the old Wesleyan School in response to a request which was forwarded to Dr Rigg that he should send the best student from the college. Harry served under the late Mr E. Burgess and later on under the headmaster, Mr R. Sowerbutts, who added that Harry was a conscientious and painstaking teacher.

Harry’s death came as a great shock to his young wife and his many friends in Cadishead, where he was held in great respect by present and old scholars and staff at Cadishead Council School. He was well known throughout the district and a great favourite of the children. During the war his visits to the school and also letters from the front were always great events for the boys in particular. A commemorative ceremony was held at the school and a number of old scholars attended. Each was presented with a photograph of Harry and a photograph was placed in the school as a memorial. Harry is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France. Medal Entitlement: 15 Star Trio.
Remembering

Pte Sidney Lee (36719), 2nd Battalion, Worcestershire Regt - dow 18.02.17
Sgt Charles Roberts (13668), 11th Bn, Manchester Regiment - kia 18.05.18
Bombardier John Hesford (70065), 147th Heavy Battery, RGA dow - 04.09.18
Pte Sidney Lee (4131324), 8th Bn, Cheshire Regiment -  kia 12.03.41