Author Topic: German & Austria PoW Camps  (Read 56125 times)

Offline themonsstar

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German & Austria PoW Camps
« on: March 21, 2008, 04:48:43 PM »
THE MAIN PRISON CAMPS IN GERMANY AND AUSTRIA In WW1

By Mrs. POPE-HENNESSY.

AIX or AACHEN.—A very ancient town (pop. 150,000) surrounded by gently . sloping, wooded hills. Once the favourite abode of Charlemagne, now a manufacturing city with over a hundred cloth factories and forty-five foundries, machine-shops, etc. There are nine hospitals in which British prisoners of war have been quartered, i.e., Reifmuseum, Maschinebauschule, Mariahilf, Luisen, Marien, Elisabeth and Garnison Hospitals, and Reserve Lazarets I and II. All British prisoners of war going to England or Holland are assembled here before leaving Germany. 8th Army Corps.

ALTDAMM, Pommern.—Small town (pop. 7,300) at the mouth of the Oder . opposite Stettin. Three camps; capacity 15,000. Built on a sandy drill-ground amidst pine woods. A few naval and civilian prisoners of war here. The centre of a large number of working gangs employed in the neighbourhood on estates, in forestry, factories, hotels, etc. 2nd Army Corps.

ALTENGRABOW (see GRABOW)..

AMBERG.—An old town (pop. 15,700) on the Vils, surrounded by a well-preserved wall and moat.The camp is built on rising ground near the new Bavarian Barracks on the outskirts of the city. Capacity 5,000.   Many prisoners go out to work in surrounding country. 3rd Bavarian Army Corps.

ARYS.—Three-quarters of a mile from the town of Arys.   Camp situated on undulating ground.Consists of fifty (barracks). Prisoners are employed in building, agriculture, etc. N.C.O.'s who do not volunteer for work are quartered there.The accommodation is of the earth barrack type.  Winter climate very severe,   20th Army Corps.


AUGUSTABAD.—A hotel near the little town of Neu Brandenburg (pop. 12,300), which is enclosed by a wall 25 ft. high and ramparts.The hotel is situated on the slope just above the Tollensee;   fishing and bathing are allowed in this lake.All British officers have been moved from here, 9th Army Corps.

BAD BLENHORST.—Eight miles from the station of Nieuburg on the Weser,not far from Soltau.The camp is situated in a Kurhaus in a good-sized park, partially wooded;tennis-lawns and fishing-ponds;surrounded by
the Liineberger Heide.10th Army Corps.
 
BAD-COLBERG (see COLBERG-BAD)..

BAUTZEN.—A town (pop. 32,800) situated on a height above the Spree.The prisoners are lodged in new artillery barracks completed just before the war. I2th Army Corps.

BAYREUTH.—Famous as the shrine of Wagner's operas. Camp situated on the outskirts of the town. A military manoeuvring ground. Barracks  of wood to accommodate 5,000. There is a hospital in the town in a large stone drill hall in the garrison compound. American prisoners here.3rd Bavarian Army Corps.

BEESKOW.—An officers' camp.Prisoners housed in the old castle of the local Bishop, built in the sixteenth century.The buildings form a good-sized court.3rd Army Corps.

BERLIN.—The capital of Prussia (pop. 3,500,000), the third largest city in  Europe. Several prison camps are established in the neighbourhood of Berlin, but none in the city itself. There is one large hospital. The Alexandrinenstrasse Lazaret, a special lazaret for prisoners of war established in the barracks of the 1st  Guard Dragoons; these barracks are built round a yard, and four wooden huts have been added to the accommodation in the barrack-yard. There is also the Stadtvogtei, a prison to which British civilians from Ruhleben are sometimes sent. Guard Corps.

BEUTHEN.—Pop. 67,700.The centre of the important Upper Silesian mining industry.There are two large lazarets here.British prisoners first sent here in the spring of  1918.6th Army Corps.

BINGEN.—On the Rhine (pop.  12,000, the centre of a large wine trade, with good quays and embankments,  and also a renowned technical college. British officers have recently been sent to this town.18th Army Corps.

BISCHOFSWERDA.—A little town (pop. 8,000).The officers' camp consists of new cavalry barracks situated some distance from the town on a hill near pine woods. Barracks not used before the war. For the moment abandoned. I2th Army Corps.

BLANKENBURG.—An officers' camp six miles from Berlin, consisting of three storied houses, well built, lighted and heated. Formerly a home for gentlewomen.Surrounded by well-kept grounds.3rd Army Corps.

BRANDENBURG.—A town (pop. 53,500) on the Havel, thirty-eight miles w.s.w.of Berlin.The camp consists   of an abandoned terra-cotta factory. Prisoners here are naval and mercantile marine.3rd Army Corps.

BREMEN.—An important city (pop. 247,000) on both banks of the Weser; one of the chief commercial centres in north Germany and the headquarters of the North German Lloyd.There is a newly built garrison hospital in which prisoners are treated,  also a working camp attached to Soltau. 9th Army Corps.

BURG.—A town (pop. 24,100) with cloth factories founded by Hugenots.The officers' camp was an artillery mobilisation centre, and consists of wagon-sheds, stores and stables.Wooden huts have been added to these buildings and some nine hundred prisoners can be accommodated here.The exercise ground is limited.   4th Army Corps.

BURGSTEINFURT.—There are no longer any British prisoners in this camp.7th Army Corps.

CARLSRUHE.—The capital (pop. 100,000) of the Grand Duchy of Baden. The  streets spread out fan-wise from the Schloss. This town has become industrialised since 1870 and makes engines, railway carriages, furniture, plated goods, etc. There is an officers' camp to which the great number of newly captured British officers are sent. It consists of wooden hutments erected in the grounds of the Schloss. I4th Army Corps.

CASSEL (Niederzwehren).—This town (pop.  153,000) is the headquarters of the 11th Army Corps.The camp is place! on a hill overlooking the Fulda Valley, one mile from Niederzwehren, a suburb of Cassel.   Barracks of wood accommodating some 20,000.   Prisoners employed in factories and workshops.   American prisoners here.

CELLE (Scheuen).—Camp a few miles from the town of Celle on the Aller, twenty-eight miles N.E.  of Hanover.A training centre for German reserves.On sandy soil near pine woods.Camp broken up in the autumn of 1916,but Reserve Lazaret I (St. Joseph) reserved for eye cases.10th Army Corps

CELLE SCHLOSS.—A camp for civilians and ex-officers at Celle town established in the old castle, which is picturesquely situated on a hill amongst fine grounds.It is a large building, formerly belonging to the King of Hanover. 10th Army Corps.

CHEMNITZ.—A large and important manufacturing town (pop. 287,000) at the base of the Erzgebirge. The camp is on a hill above the town in newly built artillery barracks—the Friedrich August Kaserne. Central steam heating throughout, as in some other Saxon camps. British prisoners brought back from Russian Poland were, for the most part, brought to this camp. Many are employed in neighbouring salt mines, 19th Army Corps.

CLAUSTHAL.—The most important place in the Oberharz, and a mining centre.Country bleak and sterile. The mining output includes gold, silver, lead and copper. There is an officers' camp about two miles from the town, established in the Kurhaus Pfauenteich, 2,000 ft. above sea-level, in the Hartz Mountains. It is built of wood with brick foundations. 10th Army Corps. http://themanchesters.org/forum/index.php?topic=1517.0

COBLENZ.—The capital of Rhenish Prussia (pop. 55,000) in a beautiful position at the confluence of the Moselle and Rhine.The centre of the wine trade.There is a hospital lazaret here run by Brothers of Mercy, in which prisoners are treated.8th Army Corps.

COLBERG (BAD).—The sanatorium for thermal springs is now an officers'camp, Temporary  buildings  have  been added. Surroundings attractive and healthy. 11th Army Corps.

COLOGNE.—The largest town (pop. 500,000) in Rhenish Prussia and one of the most important commercial places in Germany, with extensive harbour works and wharves on the Rhine. A first-class fortress. There is no general camp for prisoners here, but there are several hospitals. The majority of the Britisli prisoners are treated either in the Garnison Lazaret I or the Kaiserin Augusta Schule Lazaret VI. There is also a prison for officers undergoing special punishment in the Schnurgasse, a massive old military prison. 8th Army Corps.


CONSTANCE.—Pop. 15,000.   Situated on the lake of the same name. It is the place in which all officers and men for internment in Switzerland are concentrated.

COTTBUS.—A busy town on the Spree (pop. 48,600) containing wool, linen and  yarn factories. Seventy miles S.E. of Berlin. The camp is situated on rising ground on the outskirts of the town. The buildings radiate from a central guard tower. There is a Y.M.C.A. hut. This is a coal-mining district, and the camp is under the same command as Merzdorf. 3rd Army Corps.

CREFELD.-—An important railway centre (pop.  130,000)  containing the chief velvet and silk factories in Germany. Has now been abandoned as a British officers' camp.There is a lazaret for men here.8th Army Corps.

CROSSEN (see KROSSEN).
 
CUSTRIN.—A strongly fortified town  (pop.   17,600)  at the confluence of the Warthe and the Oder.Two of the forts forming part of the fortress surrounding the town are arranged to accommodate officers—Fort Gorgast and Fort Zorndorf.3rd Army Corps.

CZERSK.—Small town on the Danzig-Schneidemiihl Railway in West Prussia.A camp for Russians, to which British prisoners have recently been sent. 17th Army  Corps.

DANZIG (Troyl).—Capital of West Prussia (pop. 170,000). Headquarters of I7th . Army Corps. One of the most important commercial towns in North Germany. The prisoners here are housed in barges four deep and four in length, moored to a flat stretch of land on the bank of the Vistula River opposite the city of Danzig. Some of these barges contain one hundred to five hundred men. The holds are lit by electricity. The administration, kitchen, store-houses, etc., of the camp are on land. There is a Y.M.C.A. hut.

DARMSTADT.—Capital of the Grand Duchy of Hesse (pop. 87,000). The camp  is four miles from the town and consists of brick buildings on the cavalry exercise ground. There are a large number of working commandos attached to this camp; there is also a camp hospital in which six Catholic Sisters, work. There is a lazaret in the town. American prisoners here. i8th Army Corps.

DEUTSCH GABEL.—A camp on the confines of Bohemia and Saxony for merchant seamen.Under Austrian administration.
 
DOBELN—A small town (pop. 19,600). There is an officers camp here established in barracks built of brick about a mile from the station, 19th Army Corps.

DOEBERITZ.—A large camp eight miles from Berlin in which prisoners of the   Naval  Division  captured  at  Antwerp in   1914  were imprisoned.It is described as the Aldershot of Berlin and is close to an important military training centre.There is a Y.M.C.A. hut here.Guard Corps.

DORTMUND.—The largest city in Westphalia (pop. 300,000) and the centre of an important mining district.   There is a modern hospital for prisoners on the outskirts of the town administered by Catholic Brothers of Mercy.There is also a working camp.Men are housed in large brick buildings and are engaged in mining and in iron foundries, 7th Army Corps.

DUISBURG.—An ancient town which has become a large manufacturing city (pop. 229,000).One of the chief depots of the Ruhr coal-traffic, and one of the finest river ports in Germany.There is an assembly camp for
prisoners here, and it is the centre of many working commandos.7th Army Corps.

DOLMEN.—A small town (pop. 7,500) with a castle surrounded by estates of the Duke of Croy-Diilmen, the centre of numerous working commandos.There is a large assembly camp placed on high heather ground five miles from the town.The barracks are good.7th Army Corps.

DUSSELDORF.—A centre on the Lower Rhine (pop.380,000) of great industrial importance.A great land port.   There is  a garrison lazaret newly built on the outskirts of the town in which prisoners are treated.
They also work in the town.7th Army Corps.

DYROTZ.—Seven miles from Dbberitz, near Berlin.Prisoners are housed in newly erected, well-ventilated barracks.There is a recreation hut built by the men themselves out of British funds.Guard Corps.

ERFURT.—A  very ancient town  on the  Gera (pop. 111,500).The prisoners' barracks here are built in the exercise ground in the town.Capacity, 15,000.7th Army Corps.

ERLANGEN.—A   university   town   (pop.   15,814).Hospital for officers.3rd Bavarian Army Corps.

EUTIN.—The birthplace of Weber.An old town (pop. 6,200) on a lake in Holstein. Officers' camp.

FRANKFURT A/M.—Important commercial city  (pop. 410,000)  on the Main with large  Jewish  colony.    There  are  several hospitals here in which British prisoners have been treated.Reserve Lazaret II and H 65 are the principal ones.

FRANKFURT A/0.—Pop. 68,200.Formerly the seat of a university (1506-1811).The camp lies on a high sloping plain four miles from the town, with lovely views.There is a Y.M.C.A. hut.   Formerly the site of the Grube Vaterland coal-mining works.Capacity, 18,000.3rd Army Corps.

FRIEDBERG.—Pop. 9,500.Once a free imperial city.It is twenty-five miles north of Frankfurt a. Main, within sight of Nauheim. Officer prisoners are quartered in stone barracks completed on outbreak of war.Situated
on extreme outskirts of town.There is a row of little gardens for the use of the interned, but no trees.   18th Army Corps.

FREIBURG.—A beautifully sHuated town(pop.  80,000)with views over the surrounding country.The officers' camp is in the old university building in the town, built round a quadrangle with trees in it.14th Army Corps.

FRIEDRICHSFELD.—Sixty miles morth of Cologne near Wesel.  Capacity, 35,000.There is an open space in the centre of the camp for football and tennis; also gardens with flower-beds between the barracks; large vegetable gardens and potato field run by the prisoners. It is the centre of many working commandos, mining and otherwise. It is also a postal station for a large number of prisoners who have never been in the camp itself. 7th Army Corps.

FURSTENBERG.—A small town fifty miles north of Berlin.The officer prisoners are quartered in a well-known summer hotel or Erholungsheim, with a good view over the surrounding country and lake, a mile from the town. It has a glass verandah and the grounds are considerable. Walks are permitted. Close to the main road. 9th Army Corps.

GARDELEGEN.—An old town with dilapidated walls (pop. 8,500) near Stendal on the line Hanover-Berlin.A large camp, to which prisoners have been sent since September,1914.The centre of many workin commandos.4th Army Corps.

GERMERSHEIM.—Pop. 6,000.Situated at the confluence of the Gneich and Rhine.The camp is a mile from the town, which contains eleven hospitals. 2nd Bavarian Army Corps.

GIESSEN.—Chief town in Upper Hesse, on the Lahn (pop. 31,000), the seat of a  university. The prisoners' camp stands on a hill a mile and a-half above the town flanked on one side by main highway and on the other by pine-woods, surrounded by a high board fence. Barracks are raised two to three feet from the ground. Library, good prisoner of war band and Y.M.C.A. hut. A great many Canadians concentrated here at one time. American prisoners here. 18th Army Corps.

GLEIWITZ.—Pop. 66,900. Situated in a mining and manufacturing district of Silesia. British prisoners sent there after March, 1918. Accommodation in cavalry barracks.

GNADENFREI.—A Moravian Colony in Silesia, near Neisse. Officers' camp situated in a school for boys belonging to a religious brotherhood.6th Army Corps.

GORLITZ.—A busy town (pop. 85,800) with extensive cloth and machinery factories on the Neisse.The camp, with a capacity of 14,000, is situated near the town.It is liable to become muddy, and plank walks and roads have been made throughout the enclosure.18th Army Corps.

GOTTINGEN.—Old  university town (pop. 37,500).The prison camp is situated on the side of a hill on the outskirts of Gottingen.British prisoners sent away from here November, 1916.Library. Classes and lectures
held in the camp under Professor Stange of the University,10th ArmyCorps.

GRABOW.—A great working camp centre.Prisoners employed on estates, in forestry, on railway line between Berlin and Liibeck, in factories,  etc. Camp consists  of eight compounds of six barracks each.    Formerly a military camp.4th Army Corps.

GRAFENWOHR.—In Bavaria.Lazaret on the outskirts of the town near the new military drill ground;also camp for prisoners.Buildings modern with stucco walls and tiled roofs.Bavarian Corps.

GRAUDENZ.—A strong fortress town (pop. 40,300)on the Polish frontier,picturesquely situated on the right bank of the Vistula.British officers have been sent there since March,1918.It was used as a prison in the
war of 1870. American prisoners here.

GRIESHEIM.—A village ten minutes by rail from Frankfurt a/M.Officers are quartered in school buildings.   18th Army Corps.

GUBEN.—Pop.   387,300).Pleasantly situated on the Neisse,with extensivs cloth and hat factories.As at Krossen, the prison camp is arranged round a central guard tower with barracks radiating from it.It is five miles from the city.3rd Army Corps.

GUSTROW.—A cathedral town in Mecklenburg (pop. 17,800) with an old ducal castle.The prison camp is situated in pine-woods three miles from the town.It consists of wooden barracks holding some 25,000 men.    The camp carries on its register over 50,000 names, which proves that it is a centre for a great number of working commandos,9th Army Corps.

GUTERSLOH.—A silk and cotton centre (pop. 18,300).The camp consists of brick buildings originally  erected for a sanatorium.Situated in pine-wood district on sandy soil.Never before occupied.Large exercise ground,hockey, football and tennis. 7th Army Corps.

HALLE.—On the Saale (pop. 180,500), with a university of great repute.It is an industrial place of some importance with manufactures of machinery,sugar and starch.The prison camp for officers is a disused factory in the manufacturing district of Halle.Built round three sides of a square. Exercise ground,too by 50 yards.Disused in 1917, now once more in use.4th Army Corps.






















« Last Edit: November 05, 2008, 10:26:08 PM by harribobs »

tisgrannie

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2008, 01:05:13 AM »
Thanks mack thats great info you have provided.
best wishes
tisgrannie

Offline DaveMurphy

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2008, 06:34:46 AM »
Roy.

Perfect, just what I need for the POW table in my Database!

Cheers,

Dave

Offline Wendi

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #3 on: March 22, 2008, 08:27:20 AM »
How informative Roy !  Thank you.

Who was Mrs. POPE-HENNESSY ?

Wendi  :)
"Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it!  No matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and with your own common sense" ~ Buddha

Offline themonsstar

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #4 on: March 22, 2008, 10:21:07 AM »
HAMELN.—Pop. 22,100. On the Weser near the influx of the Hamel. An old  town. The Salmon fishing here is important. The prison camp is placed on low ground with wooded hills behind it. It is a mile from Hameln Town, and the parent camp of many working camps. It consists of 100 barracks, all of the same type, radiating from a central point. Theatre and Y.M.C.A. hall. 10th Army Corps.

HAMMELBURG.—An ancient town in Bavaria, picturesquely placed on a  height of 2,500 ft. on the right bank of the Saale. Most of the old streets were destroyed by fire in 1854. There is an assembly camp for British prisoners of war two miles from the town. The camp enclosure is situated on sloping ground on the highest extremity of a large treeless military reservation extending for several miles. American prisoners here. 2nd Bavarian Army Corps,

HAMBURG.—The second city of Germany (pop.932,000) one of the most important commercial centres in the world.There are two hospitals in which prisoners are treated.Reserve Lazaret 7, a ward of the central prison at Fuhlsbuttel, near the city.Reserve Lazaret 3 at the Eppendorfer Krankenhaus.Veedel,a marine lazaret,9th Army Corps.

HAMMERSTEIN.—A small town near Neu Stettin in West Prussia.The centre of many working commandos,   7th Army Corps.

HANOVER.—Capital of the Prussian province of Hanover (pop. 302,000).Headquarters of the 10th Army Corps.Industrial centre for machinery, iron,indiarubber goods, textiles and ledgers.Prisoners are treated in Lazaret 5 in the Royal War Schools, a two-storied building, also at the Garrison Lazaret.There are several working camps here attached to Hameln.

HAVELBERG.—Small town (pop. 6,200) with Romanesque cathedral.Near it is placed  the  camp for  civilian prisoners,  which  consists of hutments surrounded by high wire netting.There are 4,500 of all nationalities there. Prisoners from Ruhleben are occasionally sent to this camp.Nearly 400 British Indians are on the register.3rd Army Corps.

HEIDELBERG.—A university town (pop. 56,000) at the confluence of the Neckar and Rhine.The officers are quartered in large new barracks never before occupied, four miles from town.Three tennis courts and small exercise ground. Recreation room and electric light. Billiard table. Practically a transit camp for officers going or hoping to go, to Switzerland. I4th Army Corps.

HEILBRONN.—An important commercial and manufacturing place (pop. 40,000)charmingly situated on both banks of the Neckar.The camp is attached to Stuttgart.

HESEPE. (see HAMELN).—A small village with few inhabitants.Surrounding country flat, wooded and fertile.   On the open sandy plain near the village there is a compound of three wooden barracks for officers. American  prisoners here.10th Army Corps.

HEILSBURG.—A big camp on the outskirts of the town divided by a chaussee, the camp proper being on one side and the lazaret on the other.Consists of fifty earth huts.Centre of commandos engaged in agriculture and in rebuilding the devastated town of Goldap and other places,7th Army Corps.

HEUBERG.—This camp is situated on high ground above the Danube, and was formerly a large exercise ground.It is twenty five miles from Sigmaringen and 3,000 ft. above sea level.Ten blocks each containing ten barracks. I4th Army Corps.

HEUSTADT.—A centre of working commandos in East Prussia.

HOLZMINDEN- A town (pop 10,200) containing a modern school of engineering. Up till 1917 this camp was for French civilian PoW, male and female. Since 1917 a British officers' camp has been established here, 10th Army Corps.

INGOLSTADT.—A fortified town on the Danube and the scene of previous fighting. The town (pop. I9,OOO) was beseiged by Gustavus Adolphus in 1632, and by Moreau in 1800. The camp is situated in a flying field on the edge of the town. It is of the barrack type, with a capacity for 4,000 prisoners of war. There are two hospitals in the town. In the surrounding fortifications, i.e., in Fortresses 8, 9 and 10, officer are imprisoned. Prince Karl is the name of the best of these forts, which is situated on a dry part of the hill. 14th Army Corps. http://themanchesters.org/forum/index.php?topic=1519.0

JULICH (see AIX).—A town (pop. 6,000) near the Dutch Frontier.Seventeen miles from Aix. Many British prisoners have been treated in hospital here.18th Army Corps.

KALISCH.—In West Prussia.A camp for Russian and Roumanian prisoners,to which British prisoners were sent in April,  1918.

KARLSRUHE (see CARLSRUHE.)

KARLSTEIN.—In Lower Austria.A village with a mediaeval castle, erected in 1348 by the Emperor Charles,  standing on a height.An internment station "for civilians.

KATTOWITZ.—A thriving industrial town (pop.  43,200).Chief seat  of  the coal trade of Upper Silesia.A camp for Russian and Roumanian prisoners, to which British prisoners were sent in April,  1918.

KATZENAU.—A concentration camp near Vienna for civilians of all nationalities.

KEMPTEN.—A free town (pop. 14,800) of the Empire till 1803.It is picturesquely placed on the Iller, and consists of two portions—the Altstadt on the river, and the Neustadt on the hill.British prisoners are quartered in the hospital here.I3th Army Corps.

KO'NIGSBRUCK.—In Saxony.A camp of wooden hutments situated on sandy soil amidst pine-woods a short distance from the town, Capacity 15,000. 12th Army Corps.

KO'NIGSTEIN.—A fortress high above the Elbe near the Saxo-Bohemia Frontier,Beautiful position.Officers.  I2th Army Corps.

KREUZNACH.—A small  town  on the  Saarbriicken-Metz line.The  prisoners are in a civilian hospital five or six stories high, holding some 600 wounded. British first heard of here in 1918.18th Army Corps.

KRONACH (see ROSENBERG.)

KROSSEN.—A town on the Oder above Frankfurt. Near the town is a large  camp radiating from a circular space in the centre of which is a large mound surmounted by a tower. Round this mound are placed three field-pieces which would control the camp in case of mutiny. The compounds radiate off from this centre like the spokes of a wheel. There is a Y.M.C.A. hut here and workshops for bootmaking, etc. The camp is well spoken of. 3rd Army Corps.

LAHR.—An industrial town (pop. 14,000) three miles from Offenburg.British prisoners were first sent here in  1917.Officers' camp.

LANDAU.—A small town (pop. 3,200) with large breweries on the right bank of the Isar.The camp is on the outskirts of the town amid view of the Hartz and Vosges Mountains.A wine-growing country.3rd  Bavarian
Army Corps,

LANDSBERG.—An old town (pop. 6,500) in the valley of the Lech.The church contains wonderful stained   glass.There is a lazaret here in which prisoners are treated,1st Bavarian Army Corps.


LANDSHUT.—An old-fashioned town (pop.19,000) with wide streets an gabled houses on the Isar.An old castle rises above the town.American prisoners here.Officers' camp.

LAMSDORF.—In Silesia.A centre for working commandos.6th Army Corps.

LANGENSALZA—A busy town (pop.   12,6oo) containing cloth and cotton factories.The camp was opened in 1914, and consists of hutments, each holding 250 men.Capacity,10,000. Centre of numerous working commandos. American prisoners here,11th Army Corps.

LAUBAN.—Town (pop.15,500) with sixteenth century Rathhaus, on Silesian Mountain Railway.The centre of many working camps and of locomotive works.5th Army Corps.

LECHFELD.—The camp is situated in the valley of the Lech one mile from the village.It is a compound of wooden and brick barracks placed on the exercise ground of the Artillery and Flying Corps.Three hours by rail from Munich.Capacity,  10,500.1st Bavarian Army Corps.






« Last Edit: November 05, 2008, 10:27:13 PM by harribobs »

Offline John W

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #5 on: March 22, 2008, 03:07:26 PM »
How informative Roy !  Thank you.

Who was Mrs. POPE-HENNESSY ?

Wendi  :)

...and where is this info from?
In memory of my great grandfather: 9671 Pte Joseph Percy Rothwell, Manchester Regiment (Boer War, Mons, Le Cateau, PoW, Home Guard) & his father, 1090 Pte Joseph Rothwell, 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers 1871-1882.

Offline themonsstar

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #6 on: March 23, 2008, 11:08:09 AM »
Prisoner of War Committee

liverpool annie

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #7 on: March 25, 2008, 08:13:37 PM »
How informative Roy !  Thank you.

Who was Mrs. POPE-HENNESSY ?

Wendi  :)

Una Pope-Hennessy

Dame Una Constance Pope-Hennessy DBE (1876–17 August 1949), née Una Constance Birch, was a British writer, mainly on history and biography.
She was the daughter of Sir Arthur Birch and married Major (later Major-General) Richard Pope-Hennessy in 1910.
Pope-Hennessy's books, usually published as Una Birch, included: Maxims of a Queen (1907; writings of Queen Christina of Sweden, selected and translated by Birch), Anna van Schurman: Artist, Scholar, Saint (1909), Secret Societies and the French Revolution (1911; still in print as Secret Societies: Illuminati, Freemasons and the French Revolution[1]), Madame Roland: A Study in Revolution (1917), Early Chinese Jades (1923; about Chinese jade figurines, which she collected), Three English Women in America (1929; about Fanny Trollope, Fanny Kemble and Harriet Martineau), The Aristocratic Journey (1931; the edited letters of Margaret Hall in the United States, 1827–1828), The Laird of Abbotsford: An Informal Presentation of Sir Walter Scott (1932), Edgar Allan Poe, 1809–1849: A Critical Biography (1934), The Closed City: Impressions of a Visit to Leningrad (1938; she had visited in 1937), Agnes Strickland: Biographer of the Queens of England (1940), Durham Company (1941; about the literary associations of County Durham), Charles Dickens (1945), A Jade Miscellany (1946), Sir Walter Scott (1948), A Czarina's Story (1948; by Tsarina Alexandra of Russia; translated and edited by Pope-Hennessy), and Canon Charles Kingsley (1948).
During the First World War, she was a member of the Central Prisoners of War Committee of the British Red Cross Society. For this work, she was appointed Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire (DBE) in the 1920 civilian war honours.
Her two sons were both notable in their own right: James Pope-Hennessy was a writer and Sir John Pope-Hennessy an art historian.


Offline Wendi

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #8 on: March 25, 2008, 09:10:47 PM »
Cheers Annie, but it took a girlie  ;D

Wendi  :) 

Don't quote the source guys unless you are willing to reveal it.  And if your not willing to reveal it don't bother to quote it  :P

It's only worth reading if it's traceable  :-*
"Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it!  No matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and with your own common sense" ~ Buddha

Offline themonsstar

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2008, 05:21:16 PM »
What?



Offline John W

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #10 on: March 28, 2008, 09:30:25 AM »
Is there any more to come after the 'L's? Interesting list which in some places matches details supplied to me by the ICRC.
In memory of my great grandfather: 9671 Pte Joseph Percy Rothwell, Manchester Regiment (Boer War, Mons, Le Cateau, PoW, Home Guard) & his father, 1090 Pte Joseph Rothwell, 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers 1871-1882.

Offline themonsstar

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2008, 02:13:52 PM »
Yes there is more to come, its just getting time to do it ;D

Offline John W

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2008, 06:14:46 PM »
Hello Mons,

Just wondered if you'd found time to add any others?

John
In memory of my great grandfather: 9671 Pte Joseph Percy Rothwell, Manchester Regiment (Boer War, Mons, Le Cateau, PoW, Home Guard) & his father, 1090 Pte Joseph Rothwell, 12th (The Prince of Wales's) Royal Regiment of Lancers 1871-1882.

manxflyer

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2009, 04:43:43 PM »
themonsstar,

Great list of the POW camps. Do you have an entry for Mannheim please?

Thanks.

Karl

Offline themonsstar

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Re: German & Austria PoW Camps
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2009, 06:10:23 PM »
Hi Karl
Can not do the rest of the PoW camps at the moment as I can not find my file.