Author Topic: Can't understand the service records!  (Read 4840 times)

Offline helen_w

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Can't understand the service records!
« on: May 19, 2012, 02:04:54 PM »
William Holland, a Manchester lad, joined the army on 16th July 1877. He was 19 years old. He went out to the Cape of Good Hope in March 1879 and came back in October 1879. Left the army - minus his eye in 1881.

I don't really understand the numbers I find.
His number was 1952 on his attestation sheet.
He joined 4th Brigade and was a 1264
To go to the Cape of Good Hope he was transferred to 25th Brigade and became 2026. He was also a 2/19 and a R.?.O

Can someone explain this in simple terms to a newie!!
Thank you

Offline themonsstar

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Re: Can't understand the service records!
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2012, 03:16:27 PM »
Hi Helen
When he joined up he would have gone to any of the Infantry Training Unit (4th Brigade) from there he joined the 19th of Foot (The Green Howards) Princess of Wales's Own Yorkshire Regiment of Foot.

This Regiment just like a lot of other units of the British Army had more then one Battalions  1/19th  2/19th.

The Two Howards
The Regiment was known as the Green Howards from 1744. At that time, regiments were known by the name of their colonel. The 19th regiment's colonel was Hon. Sir Charles Howard. However, at the same time the 3rd Regiment of Foot had been commanded by its Colonel Thomas Howard, since 1737. In order to tell them apart (since they both would have been known as 'Howard's Regiment of Foot'), the colours of their uniform facings were used to distinguish them. In this way, one became 'Howard's Buffs' (eventually simply The Buffs), while the other became the Green Howards. Although the Green Howards were referred to unofficially as such from then on, it was not until 1921 that the regiment was officially retitled to the Green Howards (Alexandra, Princess of Wales's Own Yorkshire Regiment).Under the Childers reforms all non-royal English infantry regiments were to wear white facings from 1881. In 1899 the regiment was able to reverse this decision with the restoration of the grass green facings formerly worn by the 19th Foot.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2012, 04:15:18 PM by themonsstar »

Offline helen_w

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Re: Can't understand the service records!
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2012, 06:41:22 PM »
I know it probably sounds odd to you but I am shocked. NONE of our family have ever been in a Yorkshire Regiment - always Manchester Regiments. He was in Manchester census before and after his service. What would make him join a Yorkshire Regiment?  

Having said that I know he was in Sheffield barracks on 4th August 1880 having been in hospital for the removal of his eye. He was discharged on April 1st 1881 and is listed as being in Sheffield barracks in the 1881 census.

What would the R.?.O mean. I just can't work out the middle letter on the original documents. Could be a M or W. So difficult to read the script.


So shocked I almost forgot to thank you.

Offline themonsstar

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Re: Can't understand the service records!
« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2012, 12:45:50 PM »
His paperwork say he joined up at Ashton-U-Lyne

Offline helen_w

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Re: Can't understand the service records!
« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2012, 03:22:20 PM »
I am really new at this but if it  was Ashton under Lyne doesn't that mean it was a Lancashire Regiment?


Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: Can't understand the service records!
« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2012, 04:47:00 PM »
Helen.
The simple answer is that the Manchester Regiment as such was formed from its two predecessor regiments in 1881 when Ashton Barracks became the Headquarters and Depot of the Regiment.

Before that the Ashton Barracks had been used, like all the other barracks in the country, to house infantry and cavalry regiments stationed in the UK who were moved from place to place whenever and wherever needed. No particular Lancashire connections! So it all depends which regiment of the army was stationed in Ashton-under-Lyne in 1877 when he enlisted.

He might even have enlisted in the Militia who were based in Ashton and then transferred from them into the regular army.
Robert

Offline helen_w

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Re: Can't understand the service records!
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2012, 05:09:12 PM »
Now I understand. Thank you.