Author Topic: Lt J A Rowbottom  (Read 6372 times)

E M Lockwood

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Lt J A Rowbottom
« on: February 04, 2008, 02:13:53 AM »
Dear Robert,
I'd be up for a copy of 'The Road to Valhalla'  as well. My great uncle 2nd Lt J A Rowbottom was with the 2/6th and was killed on Sep 24 1917 while the they were at Oost Dunkerque Bains along with 10 others from the battaloin.
Do you have any information on the battalion May - Aug 1915 when they were in Gallipoli?
Any info would be welcome,
Emma
« Last Edit: February 05, 2008, 09:09:02 AM by harribobs »

Offline harribobs

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Re: 2/6th Battalion
« Reply #1 on: February 04, 2008, 09:14:59 AM »
hi emma

and welcome to the group

why not start a new thread about your uncle?  i am pretty sure we can come up with something about him!

cheers

chris
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  to serve as a warning to others."

Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: 2/6th Battalion
« Reply #2 on: February 04, 2008, 10:16:00 AM »
 Emma,

The 2/6th were not at Gallipoli.  They went abroad to France for the first time in February 1917.  The original 6th Battalion, or 1/6th as they were later described,were at Gallipoli
Robert
Robert

E M Lockwood

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Re: 2/6th Battalion
« Reply #3 on: February 04, 2008, 04:56:19 PM »
Hi Robert - I have my uncle's service card which states his unit as 2nd/6th Bn. also his army medical record shows he was wounded on Aug 8 1915 at Gallipoli. He was invalided home through Alexandria on the hospital ship HMHS Rewa . Also I came across a piece of info about the regiment on www.stockport1914-1918.co.uk/index  under the Index heading Fields of Fire - Battle Histories, August 1915
Here is an extract:

Gallipoli - The Battle of the Vineyard
Date: 7 August 1915
Regiment: 6th Battalion, Manchester Regiment

On 6 August, the 5th Manchesters took part in an unsuccessful attack and, the next day, it was the turn of the 6th Battalion. The attack would become known as the Battle of the Vineyard. The troops were in position by 7am. The Turkish Army was obviously prepared for another assault and was shelling the British position. The Battalion War Diary notes that "The enemy bombardment was tremendous and even before the first assault; we had a good many casualties in the trenches". Leading the attack would be "C" Company. At 9.40, they left the trench and reached the Turkish front line, some 70 yards away. There were many casualties - some had got no more than 20 yards before being mown down by machine gun fire. Private F Ollerenshaw, "C" Company, described it in a letter published in the Stockport Advertiser "We were all ready on the ladders and steps and, when the word came, we went up together and ran as fast as we could"


Was there a different unit of the 6th Battalion in Gallipoli? I know he originally joined the Manchester Regiment in 1913 in the 5th Res. Battalion.

Thanks for any help,
Emma

E M Lockwood

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Re: 2/6th Battalion
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2008, 05:02:39 PM »
Sorry Robert - I was too hasty in reading your reply and see that you had already answered my question!

Offline harribobs

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Re: 2/6th Battalion
« Reply #5 on: February 04, 2008, 05:10:24 PM »
to explain a little about the 1/6th, 2/6th and 3/6th

the territorial force was created for home defence. at the start of the war, they were asked if they would served overseas, most said yes and wore the imperial service badge proudly. they formed the 1/6th, the remainder formed the 2/6th they trained and supplied the 1/6th with replacements and after conscription were sent abroad in their own right, the 3rd/6th was then formed to train and supply replacements for the 1/6th and 2/6th

after being wounded, he could have been easily transferred to the 2/6th
“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
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E M Lockwood

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Re: 2/6th Battalion
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2008, 05:32:03 PM »
Thanks so much for the clarity! I have quite a bit of Lt. Rowbottom's information as I took a trip to the National Archives last year. Some of the lingo I don't understand, but have copies of his records; Attestation Papers; Statement of Services; Military History sheet and Certifacate of recommendation for admission to an Officer Cadet Unit. Also a copy from his battalion's diary of the days surrounding his death (and of course a photograph). I don't know if any of this is useful to you and if so, what?
Emma

Tony1/612742

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Re: 2/6th Battalion
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2008, 09:44:42 PM »
Hi, yes he was at Gallipoli. 1673 Private J A Rowbottom. An original 1/6th. He was first wounded  on 22nd May whilst resting in the underzone. He is listed in the War Diary in the entry for 22nd May. Then he was shipped out after the Vinyard. All Territorials were highly thought of by the regular army once the war started and leadership experience and basic military know how was in very short supply to lead the Kitchener Army. Many NCO's and Privates were made Officers. This happened to hundreds of them. T

E M Lockwood

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Re: 2/6th Battalion
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2008, 03:50:37 AM »
Thanks Tony. This forum is fabulous - you all know so much! One more question:
Joseph Rowbottom was in London War hospital from September 1915 for at least 6 weeks. The next info I have is from the Company Conduct Sheet, an entry July 16, 1916 where he is still a Private and then Dec 15, 1916 when he is a Corpl. His Certificate of Recommendation for Admission to an Officer Cadet Unit is dated Dec 28, 1916 - would he have been in England all during 1916? Also do you know where he would have done his Officer training in the winter & spring of 1917?

Sorry for all the questions, but as he was killed he has no descendants and I feel on a bit of a mission to reconstruct his short life!
Thanks,
Emma

Offline harribobs

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Re: Lt J A Rowbottom
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2008, 10:18:14 PM »
not much on officers died i'm afraid
“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
  to serve as a warning to others."

E M Lockwood

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Re: Lt J A Rowbottom
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2008, 02:04:57 AM »
Well yes..... there were so many of them. Still any little bit helps so thank you!

Offline mack

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Re: Lt J A Rowbottom
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2008, 03:57:20 AM »
2/Lt joseph,arnold rowbottom
formerly private 1673 j.a rowbottom
wounded 22nd may 1915,gallipoli
reported in the casualty lists in the manchester evening chronicle on monday,3rd july,1915.
his home address was incorrectly given as,120 lees st,higher broughton,joseph lived at 120 lees st,GORTON.
killed in action 24-9-17
aged 22,[i think he was born around the july-sept period].
born 1895/96

THE MYSTERY.
the absent voters registers were introduced in 1918,in order that a serviceman could register his vote,without proxy,no matter where he was serving.
joseph registered his vote from the above address,BUT he had been dead for over a year???

were his parents joseph+mary.

mack ;)

E M Lockwood

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Re: Lt J A Rowbottom
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2008, 04:09:55 AM »
Yes parents were Joseph and Mary (not the famous ones!). He was born July 6, 1895. Although his first name was Joseph he was actually known by his second name Arnold. Re the voter's list - As his father was also Joseph maybe he is the one registered?? His parents must have know he was dead as his death is reported in the his battalion's diary on Sep 24, 1917.

Offline mack

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Re: Lt J A Rowbottom
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2008, 04:53:37 AM »
Yes parents were Joseph and Mary (not the famous ones!). He was born July 6, 1895. Although his first name was Joseph he was actually known by his second name Arnold. Re the voter's list - As his father was also Joseph maybe he is the one registered?? His parents must have know he was dead as his death is reported in the his battalion's diary on Sep 24, 1917.
its not his dad who registered emma.
the entry is.
2/Lt joseph,arnold rowbottom,2/6th manchesters,120 lees st,gorton

mack ;D

Offline harribobs

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Re: Lt J A Rowbottom
« Reply #14 on: February 06, 2008, 07:46:51 PM »
" on the night of the 23/24th September, middlesex camp was heavilly shelled at intervals throughout the night by 6" naval shells

a direct hit was made on B Company's officers mess hut, and the following casualties substained

Capt T S Beaumont ( 2/8th att'd 2/6th)
2 Lt E F maitland
2 lt J A Rowbottom

Died of Wounds
2 Lt C W Cunliffe,

wounded
2 Lts. H R Stansfield, G Forshaw, J E Furness


“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
  to serve as a warning to others."