Author Topic: 50868 2nd. Lieut. James Alma Corley 2nd. Bn.attd. 12th. Bn. , later 6/7th.  (Read 6029 times)

Johnny

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My great uncle James Alma Corley was born 24/04/1892 in Peckham, London, England. He married Jessie Emily PAYS on 14/07/1917 in Peckham. He became a career soldier, transferring to the Manchester regiment from the Dragoon Guards. His service number was 50868 and he rose to the rank of 2nd. Lieutenant, before he retired in about 1935. He was awarded the M.C. in 1919, though the text of the citation doesn't even say who or where he was fighting at the time he earned the medal. He was a good shot with the rifle and won a trophy in a 1931 competition between officers of the 6/7th. Manchesters. I would like to know what became of him when he retired. He never died, according to the General Register Office registers, though I'm sure he must have passed on by now. Does anyone know when and where he died ? His wife died in 1963 in Ashton under Lyne, and his two daughters died in Chesterfield in 1999 and 2005. They had no children, so now I'm too late to ask any member of his family  what became of him.
                                      Johnny  :(

The Colonel

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Hi Johnny and welcome to the group. I think you first need to locate the grave of Jessie E Corley, nee Pays. It is most probable that they share the same grave. Have you tried emailing Dukinfield Cemetery? Since you know the date of death for Jessie, they should be able to check the burial registers of Tameside for you. If that route proves unsuccessful, I would be inclined to check the burial location of his daughter Alma Jessie Corley in Chesterfield.

I cannot locate his death entry on the national register, and it may be that his name was mispelt, or an alias has been used - for whatever reason. And of course, it might just be that his death was not registered at all. I have a great aunt whose death was not registered, so it's not so uncommon.
I noted on the 1901 census that James A Corley had an older brother, Ernest James G Corley, born 1875, who was a soldier in the 1st Rifle Brigade. I wonder if any of James A Corley's other brothers become soldiers?

Ducky Cemetery link http://www.tameside.gov.uk/bereavement#t6

The colonel
« Last Edit: December 31, 2007, 06:37:20 PM by The Colonel »

Offline harribobs

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hi johnny

welcome to the group

James Alma Corley MC MM
2/Lieut Manchester Regiment 27.2.1918
Lieut Manchester Regiment 27.8.1919

not just the MC, Military Medal as well!

chris
“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
  to serve as a warning to others."

Offline Robert Bonner

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There are a great many mentions of Lieutenant and later Captain J A Corley in the Manchester Regiment Gazette - volumes 4/5/6 & 8.  Copies are held at Regimental HQ in ARdwick, Manchester Central Library and the Regimental Archives in Ashton-under-Lyne.  Mrs Corley is also mentioned.

I shall be at Ardwick on Thursday and will have a look to see what there is. So keep your fingers crossed.

Robert
Robert

Offline Robert Bonner

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He was awarded the Military Medal as Sergeant 50868  in the Machine Gun Corps. (London GAzette 19/2/1917)

Awarded the Military Cross as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 12th Manchesters (LG 11/1/1919).  His citation reads as follows:

Awarded for conspicuous gallantry and fine leadership.  This officer was in command of the left flank support company.  During a counter-attack by the enemy he led half his company in a flank attack against very superior odds.  This greatly helped stem the tide of the attack and cut off a portion of the enemy's forces.  Later, with a patrol, he rounded up the isolated party capturing 42 prisoners and some machine guns.

Post war he must have received a regular army commission. He served with 2nd Manchesters and was certainly the adjutant of the 6th/7th Territorial Battalion of the Manchesters for three years until the end of 1932.  He then rejoined the 2nd Battalion in the Sudan on 25 December 1932.  In 'A' Company notes in the July 1933 edition of the Gazette mention is made of 'thanks to Captain Corley for the great interest he took in the training of the men in a boxing competition and the capable way in which he refereed all the contests.'

He is shown in the Honours list on page 46 of my little book on the 12th Battalion but I can't find any mention of him in the text.

Robert
Robert

carolb94

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Hi there.  I have just joined the forum today.  Are you still searching for information about James Alma Corley? Please let me know, as I am too a family member.  Carol

Offline mack

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hiya carol.
i dont think johnny is still monitoring his thread.
the reason he had trouble finding capt corleys death,was because he changed his name by deed poll,on 25-2-1936,to john,james jolliffe,he died in bromley,kent in november 1984 aged 92

some bits that have come up
capt james alma corley,6/7th manchesters,arrived in london from rangoon on 11-7-1929,on the SS.sagaing

capt corley arrived in liverpool from jamaica 12-3-1935,on the SS mopan

mack ;D

Offline mack

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captain corleys younger brother stephen,married ada,ethel pays,at st.johns church,east dulwich,on 4-9-18,she was the sister of capt corleys wife jessie,they lived at 19 worlington rd,east dulwich,this is the address that capt corley gave when he applied for his medals in the 1920s
stephen was driver 12129 stephen,edward corley,35th brigade,RFA,occupation butcher

mack ;D

Offline Wendi

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captain corleys younger brother stephen...........occupation butcher

mack ;D
On the 1901 Census his father is involved in a Pork & Butchers Shop so perhaps he learned his trade there.

Further more digging on James Alma Corley and/or John James Jolliffe reveals that he retires on 1st May 1935, having returned from Valparaiso, Chilli on 29th March 1935.

From then on lived happily in Farnborough, Kent, (with the exception of the 1939-45 war years), until his death in 1984.  He is buried in the Churchyard of St. Giles Church, Farnborough, Kent.

Does anyone know why he chose the surname Jolliffe?

Wendi  :)
"Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it!  No matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and with your own common sense" ~ Buddha