Author Topic: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919  (Read 108404 times)

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #75 on: December 17, 2010, 09:47:36 AM »
cheers wendi, i have replied , but i don't have anything on him myself, just posted info on were he was at the time of his death,  ;D

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #76 on: December 18, 2010, 10:15:54 AM »

Offline Roughyed

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #77 on: December 27, 2010, 05:00:29 PM »
Hi

My great uncle William Mayall 1st COY MGC Reg No 67720 won the MM and was cited in the LG on 23 Feb 1918.  I wonder if you could shed any light on how he came to be awarded with the medal?  I understand it was for bravery in the field.

Any help would be appreciated!

Phil

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #78 on: December 27, 2010, 06:33:29 PM »
hi phil,  check out the two links, this will give you a  start,  search local papers, you could have a good chance of finding out how he won his award,  you will be very lucky if you find anything in army records 
good chance he won his mm  at the Second Battle of Passchendaele, 26 October - 10 November 1917.
it was no unusual for mm awards being listed  in the LG. 3 months later and more,
 i am sorry i can not help you any more on this, good luck and all the best for the new year. tonyrod

http://www.1914-1918.net/1div.htm
http://www.1914-1918.net/bat20.htm                     

Offline Roughyed

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #79 on: December 27, 2010, 09:36:26 PM »
Cheers Tonyrod, I'm hoping to get up to the Oldham Local Studies archive soon to trace the newspaper reports of the time - I'll let you know how I get on!!

Thanks for your help.

Phil

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #80 on: January 20, 2011, 08:27:16 AM »
A VERY NICE 100% GENUINE FULL SIZE & CORRECTLY NAMED WW1 BRONZE VICTORY MEDAL TO A MILITARY MEDAL RECIPIENT WHO WAS KIA F&F 22-9-1917

IMPRESSED ON THE RIM TO- 18175.A-SJT.J.FISHBURN.YORK.R

JAMES FISHBURN FIRST LANDED OVERSEAS IN EGYPT 14-9-1915 AS A MEMBER OF THE 6TH BATTALION YORKSHIRE REGIMENT ( GREEN HOWARDS. HE LATER TRANSFERED TO THE 9TH BATTALION OF THE YORK & LANCASTER REGIMENT WITH SERVICE NUMBER 34588 AND WAS AWARDED THE MILITARY MEDAL FOR SERVICE IN FRANCE & FLANDERS IN THE LONDON GAZETTE 16-8-1917

JAMES FISHBURN WAS KILLED IN ACTION IN FRANCE & FLANDERS 22-9-1917 STILL SERVING WITH THE 9TH BATTALION OF THE YORK & LANCASTER REGIMENT. HE WAS BORN IN HETTON-LE-HOLE, COUNTY DURHAM & ENLISTED IN HOUGHTON-LE-SPRING WHILST STILL LIVING IN HETTON-LE-HOLE.

THE C.W.G.C RECORDS THE FACT THAT HE WAS THE 22 YEAR OLD SON OF MR & MRS T FISHBURN OF, 19 BARRINGTON TERRACE, HETTON DOWNS, HETTON-LE-HOLE, COUNTY DURHAM & HE IS BURIED IN THE BEDFORD HOUSE CEMETERY IN FLANDERS

THE MEDAL IS NEF OR BETTER AND COMES COMPLETE WITH THE FULL LENGTH ORIGINAL SILK RIBBON &
DETAILS FROM BOTH S.D.G.W, C.W.G.C, THE LONDON GAZETTE & THE RECIPIENTS MEDAL INDEX CARD
DETAILS

Item number: 260724124129

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #81 on: January 26, 2011, 06:38:08 AM »

Offline Roughyed

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #82 on: January 27, 2011, 11:09:44 PM »
Re: William Mayall post above.

I have managed to look William up in the local archives and the first mention of his MM is on December 29th 1917.  The paper states that he had won the MM for 'devotion to duty under heavy shell fire'.  There isn't any more than that so it looks like this is going to be the full extent of my knowledge unless something else turns up.

Thanks everyone for your help.

Phil

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #83 on: January 29, 2011, 09:02:12 AM »

An outstanding Australia Battle of Amiens 18th August 1918 Military Medal to

 Private G.E. Barnard, 23rd Australian Infantry, AIF, an original member of the battalion, he served with the ANZAC forces at Gallipoli in September 1915 and later on the Western Front from April 1916. His M.M. was awarded for coolness and courage of the highest order when in the face of heavy machine gun fire and bombing attacks, he ran out a telephone line to within 20 yards of the enemy trenches, and as German reinforcements were coming up called down Stokes mortar fine on them with great success all the while under grenade attack from the enemy trenches.

Military Medal, GVR, correctly named to: (961 PTE G.E. BARNARD. 23/AUST:INF.)

George Edward Barnard was born in Croydon, Surrey, England. He later emigrated to Australia with his parents, settling in Moonee Ponds, Victoria where he worked as a Leadlight importer. With the outbreak of the Great War he enlisted into the Australian Imperial Forces on 9th April 1915, aged 18, giving his next of kin as his father - Joseph Barnard, of Sydenham Street, Moonee Ponds, Victoria.

He joined the 'C' Company, 23rd Infantry Battalion, as a Private (No.961). He was one of the Battalion originals - the 23rd Battalion was raised in Victoria in March 1915 as the third battalion of the 6th Brigade. After initial training it left Australia and arrived in Egypt to complete its training. Barnard embarked from Melbourne on board HMAT A14 Euripides on 10th May 1915.

As part of the 2nd Australian Division, the 6th Brigade landed at Anzac Cove in early September, and the 23rd Battalion was soon manning one of the most trying parts of the ANZAC frontline - Lone Pine. The fighting here was so dangerous and exhausting that battalions were relieved every day. The 23rd manned Lone Pine, alternating with the 24th Battalion, until they left Gallipoli in December 1915.

Barnard himself was admitted to hospital sick with an abscess and diarrhoea on 23rd September 1915, having been admitted to the 6th Field Ambulance a day earlier, and was considered sick enough to be put aboard the hospital ship 'Grampion' and evacuated to England on 28th September being admitted to the 2nd Southern General Hospital at Bristol on 11th October 1915.

The Battalion was posted to France in early 1916, and Barnard rejoined it on 9th March 1916. On 10th April 1916 the Battalion was moved into the line, and occupied forward trenches in the Armentieres sector in northern France. This relatively gentle introduction to the Western Front was followed in July by the battle of the Somme, with the battalion taking part in the horrific battles of Pozieres and Mouquet Farm, after which it was estimated that the Battalion lost 90 percent of its original members, however Barnard made it through unscathed.

After manning the frontline through the bleak winter of 1916-17, the battalion's next trial came at the second battle of Bullecourt in May 1917. After the failure of the first attempt to capture this town, by troops from the 4th Australian Division, the new attack was heavily rehearsed. The 23rd Battalion succeeded in capturing all of its objectives, and holding them until relieved, but, subjected to heavy counter-attacks, the first day of the battle was the battalion's single most costly of the war. Barnard is noted as AWOL from 11th May, however he then appears to have returned from hospital on 18th May. On 19th June he is again admitted to hospital this time suffering from trench fever, being admitted to the 1st London General Hospital. He was continually in and out of hospital through to 13th March 1918 when he rejoined the 23rd Battalion.

In April 1918 the 23rd helped to turn back the German spring offensive, and then took part in the battles that would mark the beginning of Germany's defeat - Hamel, Amiens, and Mont St.Quentin, the fighting for the latter resulting in the battalion's only Victoria Cross, awarded to Private Robert Mactier.

Barnard himself was decorated with the Military Medal for his bravery 'at Herleville, east of Amiens, during operations on the 18th August 1918, this man in the face of heavy machine gun fire, ran out a telephone wire and established a telephone within 20 yards of the enemy. Although the enemy were being reinforced and he was subject to severe bombing he remained at his post and directed the fire of the Stokes guns on the enemy re-inforcements coming forward with great success. His coolness and courage were of the highest standard.' His award was published in the Commonwealth Gazette No.109 on 15th September 1919.

The Battalion fought its last battle around the town of Beaurevoir between 3rd and 4th October. It left the front for the last time on the night of 5th October and was resting when the Armistice was declared on 11th November 1918. The 23rd Battalion was disbanded in Belgium on 30th April 1919, Barnard as one of the originals had returned to Australia on 9th March 1918.

With quantity of research.   


Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #84 on: February 08, 2011, 04:03:31 PM »

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #85 on: February 14, 2011, 01:53:35 PM »

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #86 on: February 22, 2011, 03:07:51 PM »

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #87 on: March 10, 2011, 09:13:24 AM »
An original full sized First World War Military Medal (MM) for Bravey In The Field.
Awarded to Corporal John Henry Spencer who served during the Great War
with 'C' Battery 178th Brigade Royal Field Artillery.
He Died of Wounds on 29 November 1917.
Military Medal named in impressed capitals to:

L-8234 CPL J. SPENCER. C. 178 BDE. R.F.A.

UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919
about John Spencer
Name:   John Spencer
Residence:   Lenton, Nottingham
Death Date:   29 Nov 1917
Death Location:   France & Flanders
Enlistment Location:   Nottingham
Rank:   Corporal
Regiment:   Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Field Artillery
Number:   L/8234
Type of Casualty:   Died of wounds
Theatre of War:   Western European Theatre
Comments:   M.M

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #88 on: March 20, 2011, 07:17:09 AM »
257206  SAPr F. JEFFREY, 263/RLY COY, R.E.

This is a very scarce Railway Company MM awarded for gallantry on December 8th, 1917 in the Ypres Salient, whilst constructing light rail spurs the party came under heavy shell fire. Sapper Jeffrey was one of those men who reacted positively under fire and jumped out to save his wounded officer. It is the only MM awarded to the unit, until the German Spring Offensives of 1918 when they were involved in evacuating trains and demolishing goods stations and rail supplies as well as rail bridges.

It is easy to under-rate such awards made ot men in the back-areas, but the urge to save the lives of comrades was a very powerful one and was constant across all areas of the battlefield. Some of the most impressive gallantry awards made for WW1 are in fact lifesaving awards, simply because this act above all others represented the willingness of one man to lay down his life for his comrades. Other battlefield acts are carried out with different underlying motivating factors. Lifesaving, I feel, is the closest to true heroism. Here is an extract from a book I'm writing, about the nature of bravery 1914-18:

      "In the early part of December, 1917, the company was losing men to shell fire daily. It was a particularly unpleasant time for them. On the second of the month, one sapper was evacuated wounded to a Casualty Clearing Station (CCS); on the 5th, a 2.Lt. Robinson was evacuated with shell shock. Next day, Corporal MacKay was killed by a shell fragment; the following day 2.Lt. Farrin was mortally wounded, a Sapper was wounded in the head by an aerial bomb and another man was evacuated with shell shock. A third officer was struck off strength due to shell shock the following week and seventeen sappers were evacuated to a CCS on the 19th December. December 21st finds an entry in the unit war diary: "Good progress made on construction of Y.6 Extension Line, despite frequent heavy shelling in clear vision of enemy". This, then was the cause of the casualties, as so much of the work in the Ypres Salient was carried out in full view of the enemy who occupied surrounding ridges and hills. The company received congratulations; "on the progress made on the forward lines, the good finish to the work, and the good management shewn in handling attached labour". On the day after that note was received, 257391 Lance Corporal Baker was posted missing "believed killed". Two days later, his body was discovered in a shell hole, "he having been killed by shrapnel". On Christmas Eve, 1917, 257211 Sapper A. Snow was "mortally wounded by shrapnel and died in a Dressing Station". Four other sappers were evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station wounded.

      In spite of the operational importance and danger of their tasks, the 263rd Railway Company won just one gallantry award for all their work in the Salient in 1917, it was a Military Medal and was awarded to 257206 Sapper Frank Jeffrey, "for conspicuous gallantry on the day 2.Lt. Farrin was mortally wounded". As is so often the case with the MM, further details are unavailable, but the award was certainly for gallantry under heavy shelling and possibly for attempting to save the life of his officer and other men who may have been part buried by explosions in the forward area. The continual loss of men to shell shock illustrates the strain of working daily for relatively long periods in shelled areas. At least the infantry got regular respite from that".

 

Offline tonyrod

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Re: THE MILITARY MEDAL ROLL 1914 -1919
« Reply #89 on: March 23, 2011, 10:00:40 AM »