Author Topic: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion  (Read 11919 times)

Offline harribobs

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William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« on: December 01, 2007, 10:33:20 PM »
Anyone got ideas about this, brought over with approval  from rootschat

quote:-

His name was William Mitchell Moore born 1806 Norwich, service number 90.
He enlisted 10/12/1823 in the 94th Foot, transfered to 96th Foot 12/02/1824, serving with the 96th in Bermuda, Tasmania and India until his discharge 09/09/1851.

The original oil painting measuring approx 36" X 32" of him has been passed down through the family via eldest son to myself from my god parents who unfortunately had no heirs.

I am not sure that the painting shows him in his 96th uniform as I believe the facings should be buff.

I am attaching a photo of the original uniform sleeve that I also have in my collection.



detail of actual sleeve

“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
  to serve as a warning to others."

liverpool annie

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2007, 11:18:19 PM »


You probably have this already .... but just in case !!  ::)

Known as (nickname)..................................................." The Bend Overs"

Head Quarters of this Regiment was stationed in Windsor in 1841. In 1842 the Headquarters moved to Parramatta and then to Launceston in 1843. The Regiment remained in Tasmania until 1848 sailing to India in January of 1849.
Commanding Officer......................................................Lieut. Colonel W. Hulme

The 96th regiment was broken into 26 separate detachments in 1839. These detachments began to arrive

in Australia during 1839, with the last detachment arriving in 1841. The headquarters for the Regiment was one of the last detachments to arrive in 1841.
This Regiment began its military term in 1760 in London but was know only as the 96th Regiment of Foot. The following is a history of the Regiments name changes.
1760.....the 96th Regiment of Foot.
1763.....Disbanded
1780.....Reformed the 96th (British Musketeers) Regiment
1783.....Disbanded
1793.....Reformed 96th (Queen's Royal Irish) Regiment of Foot
1798.....Disbanded
1802.....Reformed 96th (Queen's Own) Regiment of Foot
1803.....Renumbered 97th
1815.....Renumbered 96th.
1818.....Disbanded
1824.....Reformed 96th Regiment of Foot
1881.....Renamed 2nd Battalion of the Manchester Regiment
Amalgamation.....Now forms part of the King's Regiment
Battle Honors Prior to 1900

Egypt : 1801 , Peninsular : , New Zealand ;

96th Regiment of the British Army and while in Australia served on Norfolk Island (1840 to 1844) and in

New Zealand (1844 to 1847) and Tasmania (1847 to 1850).
 
Military records of the Regiment , Pay rolls, Pay Musters, Cemetery Records, Church Records & General Muster Records.
Reference: Records of the 96th Mitchell Library Sydney, Australia
Wellington's Military Machine (Philip J. Haythornthaite) published 1995
 
Annie  :)

liverpool annie

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2007, 11:32:36 PM »
I'm shocked at how few soldiers there were ........ :-\

The Treaty of Waitangi was first signed on February 6, 1840 and conflict between the British Crown and Maori tribes was to some extent inevitable after that. Ostensibly the Treaty established the legal basis for the British presence in New Zealand. It is still seen today as the document that established New Zealand. However both parties, and indeed most of the signatories, had different understandings of its meaning. The Maori believed that it guaranteed them the continued possession of their land and the preservation of their customs. Many of the British thought that it had opened up the country to mass immigration and settlement. On May 21, 1840 New Zealand was formally annexed by the British Crown and the following year the capital moved to Auckland, some 200 km south of Waitangi.

Meanwhile at the southern end of the North Island the New Zealand Company was aggressively purchasing land and bringing settlers to New Zealand. It maintained that the Treaty was not legally binding upon them and continued their activities in defiance of the new government.
In June 1843 the company attempted to survey some land that was still subject to dispute about its ownership. In the ensuing melee 23 Englishmen and four Maoris were killed. This became known as the Wairau Affray.

In the Bay of Islands, Hone Heke, one of the original signatories to the Treaty, was becoming increasingly unhappy with the outcome. Among other things, the relocation of the capital had resulted in a decline of the European population of the bay, a reduction in the number of visiting ships and a serious loss of revenue. Furthermore he was told by American and French traders that the British flag flying on Flagstaff Hill over the town of Kororareka signified slavery for the Maori. What made this intolerable was that the flag pole had itself been a gift from Hone Heke to the first British Resident.

Then in June 1844 a girl from his tribe went to live with an English butcher in Kororareka and defied his orders to return to the tribe. Heke and his men went into the town, looted the butcher's shop and recovered the girl. Almost as an afterthought they cut down the flag pole.
In August 1844 Governor FitzRoy arrived in the bay backed by the navy and 170 men of the 96th Regiment. He summoned the Maori chiefs to a conference which apparently defused the situation. Hone Heke did not himself attend but sent a conciliatory letter and offered to replace the flag pole.

The new accord did not last. Rumours that their land was going to be confiscated were given credence by the large number of European settlers pouring into the country. More to the point, there had not been a trial of strength between the Maori and the British. Kawiti, one of the leaders of local tribe, the Nga Puhi, had spent his whole life in inter-tribal warfare in which Ng? Puhi were usually the winners. Encouraged by Heke's defiance he decided to test his strength against the white tribe. Meanwhile Hone Heke cut down the flag pole a second time.

Once again troops of the 96th Regiment were sent to replace it, and almost immediately it was cut down again. Reinforcements were called in. A new and stronger pole sheathed in iron was erected and a guard post built around it. Meanwhile Governor FitzRoy sent over to New South Wales for reinforcements.
The next attack on the flagstaff was a much more serious affair. At dawn on 11 March 1845 the Maori attacked the guard post, killing all the defenders and cutting down the flag pole for the fourth time. At the same time, possibly as a diversion, Kawiti and his men attacked the town of Kororareka. The garrison, of about 100 men, managed to hold the perimeter while the town was evacuated to the ships moored in the bay. Most buildings in the town were burned, but the missionaries' homes and the church were not touched.

The next morning, all surviving inhabitants of Russell set sail for Auckland in HMS Hazard (whose sailors had taken part in the fighting ashore), the 21-gun United States corvette St. Louis, the Government brigantine Victoria and the schooner Dolphin. Nineteen Europeans had been killed and 27 wounded. Hone Heke and Kawiti were victorious and the Pakeha (Europeans), symbolised by their flag pole, had been humbled.

« Last Edit: December 02, 2007, 12:56:03 AM by harribobs »

liverpool annie

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2007, 12:31:53 AM »


96th Regiment were in Bermuda 1825 to 1828 -

Yellow Fever was rampant - many many soldiers from different regiments died there

http://www.bermuda-online.org/britishmilitarygravesbda.htm

Harribobs .... better send Tis - on a paid vacation - to photograph Manchester Regiment graves there !!  ::) ::) ::) ::) ::)

tisgrannie

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2007, 12:47:23 AM »
Ready and reporting for Duty SIR!!
tis
ps
seriously, if I can get them somehow I will. Would they have markers?

liverpool annie

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2007, 01:07:19 AM »


If you check on the link Tis ... you may find some have been photo'd already ... I didn't check !!  ::)

Chris ... I think this was his CO ... if we could trace him .... you'd have a better chance with William Mitchell !!  ::)

FULLER Sir J.         Colonel 96th Foot Regiment In Bermuda- Devonport   March1827 278

http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/Indexes/RN-1827.txt

I checked FIBIS and the India Office already ... nada !!

Annie  :)

liverpool annie

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2007, 01:14:05 AM »


Yellow facings date from 1842 !

http://www.the-krak.co.uk/history2.php



liverpool annie

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2007, 02:38:02 AM »


Bit more padding !!  :P

96th

Manchester Regiment The 96th regiment was broken into 26 separate detachments in 1839. These detachments began to arrive in Australia during 1839, with the last detachment arriving in 1841. The headquarters for the Regiment was one of the last detachments to arrive in 1841. Throughout 1839 to 1841 the 96th Regiment acted as convict Guards at several locations. The Regimental Head Quarters of this Regiment was stationed in Windsor in 1841. In 1842 the Headquarters moved to Parramatta and then to Launceston in 1843. The Regiment remained in Tasmania until 1848 sailing to India in January of 1849.

liverpool annie

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #8 on: December 02, 2007, 04:48:13 AM »


Could somebody else check the Gazette please .... 1849 .... !!

I tried and was just getting there ... and pouft ..... site jacked up !

Dufuss Annie  ::)

Offline harribobs

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2007, 10:44:28 AM »
now, if those facing are white, what regimental uniform are we looking at?
“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
  to serve as a warning to others."

slob

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2007, 05:03:13 PM »
I can't find him either in the London Gazette or in the Times.
There are a couple of detailed reports of actions in India in the Gazette in march 1849 but I couldn't see a mention of the 96th.

Dave

Offline harribobs

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2007, 07:25:43 PM »
thanks Dave!
“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
  to serve as a warning to others."

liverpool annie

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #12 on: December 04, 2007, 03:57:10 AM »


I found this !! with some appointments including the Colonel .... but I couldn't see anything on our man ... can anybody else ??

THE CONNAUGHT JOURNAL Galway, Thursday, February 19, 1824

96th Ditto- Major-General Joseph Fuller, to be colonel.

http://www.irelandoldnews.com/Galway/1824/FEB.html

Annie  :)

Offline sphinx

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2007, 08:55:57 PM »
He is wearing the uniform of a Colour Sergeant of an Infantry Regiment.
The Shoulder Belt Plate is NOT one ever worn by the 63rd or 96th Foot so although I don't know which Regiment it is, I can say its not ours.

regards

Offline harribobs

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Re: William Mitchell Moore 96th battalion
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2007, 10:46:29 PM »
thanks simon
“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
  to serve as a warning to others."