Author Topic: 8th batt Italy  (Read 5659 times)

sands

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8th batt Italy
« on: March 17, 2009, 02:49:30 PM »
Can anyone help me. My cousins father James Garner was killed in Italy on 30 june 1944. We know where he is buried in Assisi and I am planning to visit there this summer to pay my familys respects and photograph the cemetary for my cousin who is unable to Travel.
Has anybody any infomation about James or the circumstances of his death or what and where the manchesters were at that time thanks in advance for any help 

timberman

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Re: 8th batt Italy
« Reply #1 on: March 17, 2009, 05:56:24 PM »
Hi Sands

Welcome to the forum, you may have this information from the CWGC site but if not.

The history.

Cemetery:   ASSISI WAR CEMETERY
Country:   Italy
Locality:   unspecified
Visiting Information:   The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.
Location Information:   The War Cemetery forms part of the locality of Rivotorto in the Commune of Assisi, in the Province of Perugia. From Rome, take the Autostrada A1, Rome-Milan. Come off at Orte and go along the SS3 bis to Perugia following the signs for Assisi. Take the road to Rivotorto and at a crossroads, from which a church is visible, turn left and the cemetery is about 500 metres down this road.
Historical Information:   On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Progress through southern Italy was rapid despite stiff resistance, but the advance was checked for some months at the German winter defensive position known as the Gustav Line. The line eventually fell in May 1944 and as the Germans withdrew, Rome was taken by the Allies on 3 June. Many of the burials in this cemetery date from June and July 1944, when the Germans were making their first attempts to stop the Allied advance north of Rome in this region. The site for the cemetery was selected in September 1944 and burials were brought in from the surrounding battlefields. Assisi War Cemetery contains 945 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.
No. of Identified Casualties:   948

His listing.

Name:   GARNER, JAMES HORACE
Initials:   J H
Nationality:   United Kingdom
Rank:   Private
Regiment/Service:   Manchester Regiment
Unit Text:   8th Bn.
Age:   34
Date of Death:   30/06/1944
Service No:   14563086
Additional information:   Son of Daniel and Rose Garner; husband of Winifred Garner, of Barking, Essex.
Casualty Type:   Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference:   IX, H, 2.
Cemetery:   ASSISI WAR CEMETERY

The first picture is of The cemetery
Second is the plan
Third one shows the position of his grave on the plan

All taken from the CWGC site

Timberman
« Last Edit: March 17, 2009, 06:07:54 PM by timberman »

Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: 8th batt Italy
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2009, 03:25:42 PM »
Sands.

Five men of the Ardwicks died on 30th June 1944. I suspect that one of the wounded died from his wounds.  It was a pretty hairy time for all of them as the terrain of the Central Apennines made fighting essentially a company affair.  Privates Garner, Barker, Gloag, Haddon and Corporal Bolton of the Army Catering Corps all died

It was not unusual to be given an objective three or four miles forward and some thousands of yards from the nearest flanking own troops. Ideal ground for trained infantrymen.  On the afternoon of June 28th troop carriers, which had brought up 20 Brigade, pulled off the road under Ripa Ridge whilst waiting for return loads.  A vicious and accurate concentration artillery shoot crashed down destroying 14 vehicles.  The enemy, now aware that a relief was taking place, attacked the Ardwicks as they were taking over from 17th Brigade on Monte Pilonico.   Costly fighting took place until the raiders were repelled. Two Ardwicks were killed.

Positions were consolidated by last light on the 29th and the advance continued at 2230 hours with all objectives taken by 0430 hours on 1st July. In the advance 2nd Lieutenant Joseph Roberts was killed on the 30th and two men were killed and one wounded when their Bren-gun carrier received a direct hit.  Later another carrier towing a 6 pounder anti-tank gun was blown up by a Tellermine, resulting in one man being killed and three wounded.
Robert

sands

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Re: 8th batt Italy
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2009, 10:43:48 PM »
Thank you for the information Mr Bonner & timberman it seems that James was a driver so maybe he was in one of the the Bren carrier's that were hit. 

Lawrence

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Re: 8th batt Italy
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2010, 11:34:11 PM »
Hi re - 8th batt Italy
I'm new to this site ? I can add a little to this topic ,  My Uncle  CPL Lawrence Connell 3531801 Manchester regiment was killed on mission
date of death between 26/05/1944 and 27/5/1944 , body not found , removed from site by Germans , he is marked by cross at Sangro River war Cemetery,
I have letter from Major R C Booth ? might have booth wrong ? and letter from his pals Sgt Hibbert 3528502, and pvt Eric Mullineux 3531539 ,
I would like to know where in Italy this action took place ?  I have lots of Photo's of him in Malta etc,

Lawrence Connell 
My father named me after him ,

Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: 8th batt Italy
« Reply #5 on: May 12, 2010, 10:37:38 AM »
Lawrence. Welcome to the forum.  We will try to find out some more detail for you.  However according to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission site your uncle is shown as being a member of the 9th Battalion.  This must be incorrect if he had already served in Malta and you have a letter from Major R C Booth who was a company commander with the 8th Battalion.

It would be helpful if there is anything in the letters to indicate what he was doing on the 26/27th May 1944.
Robert

Lawrence

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Re: 8th batt Italy
« Reply #6 on: May 12, 2010, 12:25:04 PM »
Thank you for the reply Robert,
Yes I think the CWG is wrong ? Lawrence was in the 8th,
The letter from Major Booth states that Lawrence was with his officer and some other N.C.O's
and were out on Patrol mission at night behind enemy positions, They were on an important task
and all went well till they were suprised nearing the end of their job, there was a clash with a German
patrol and in the fight Lawrence was wounded by a grenade and almost at the same time struck by machine pistol bullets. Another N.C.O of the patrol dispersed the enemy and went forword , he says that Lawrence was apparantly dead, The germans came in again and patrol were forced to leave the area for some little while, Another N.C.O. later went back to the spot where he had been lying, but found he was no longer there.
It therfore appears that he had been taken to the enemy lines by the Germans.

Top of letter is as follows
Major R C Booth
8th Manchester Regiment
C.M.F. 22 June 44

Lawrence

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Re: 8th batt Italy
« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2010, 12:38:02 PM »
Picture of CPL Lawrence Connell 3531801

flower_85

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Re: 8th batt Italy
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2012, 10:37:07 PM »
Hello,

It is mentioned earlier that a 'Gloag' died in battle, I am currently researching my family history and am looking into the details of my Grandpa's war experiences.  He served with the 9th Battalion, was in Italy, and survived the war.  His name was David.  As the name is fairly uncommon, is there any more detail on the Gloag referenced earlier?

Thank you.