Author Topic: 9th battalion Manchester regiment  (Read 80 times)

Offline Hall8986

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9th battalion Manchester regiment
« on: November 22, 2020, 12:40:08 AM »
Hi, newbie here.

Is anyone able to help & point me in the direction of finding someone from the 9th battalion Manchester regiment.

Private Charles Howard 3532388
9th Manchester regiment
Died 31 August 1944 montecchio aged 26.

I have spent months researching & recently come across this forum, I am trying to find as much as I can with regards to when he joined,when he died & if possible any photos. T

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks

Offline mack

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Re: 9th battalion Manchester regiment
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2020, 03:20:52 AM »
hiya H

the 9th manchesters were putting down support fire for the assaults on the gothic line and the crossing of the river foglia

mack

Offline PhilipG

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Re: 9th battalion Manchester regiment
« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2020, 08:31:12 AM »
Mack,

The tune of Lili Marlene and the words of the 8th Army's song about their being "Way out in Italy" immediately came to mind when I read your post.  PhilipG.

Offline Bob.NB

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Re: 9th battalion Manchester regiment
« Reply #3 on: November 22, 2020, 05:26:57 PM »
That number would indicate an enrollment probably in 1939.
Bob B

Offline PhilipG

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Re: 9th battalion Manchester regiment
« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2020, 11:25:48 AM »
Hall8986,

Firstly, welcome to the Forum.  Secondly, may I refer to Reply No. 2 which was intended as a reminder that the soldiers who fought in Italy gave themselves the nickname -"The D-Day Dodgers".   Appropriate reference to the internet will indicate the reason.     The German Army's haunting song - Lili Marlene - resulted in multiple verses, heavy with sarcasm, perhaps in dubious taste, by  prestigious units which had breached the infamous Gothic Line etc.   Members produced many verses.    The one from which I quoted ends :-   "We are the D-Day Dodgers, way out in Italy."   Often sung with passion by veterans at reunions and their number must now be quite low, nevertheless it is a piece of history of a great fighting force.

Bob B's recent post was interesting.      PhilipG.