Author Topic: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946  (Read 47919 times)

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #75 on: April 07, 2016, 04:06:30 AM »
Just received this from Bill's daughter. Some of the names difficult to read but it does show some of the regiments involved including the 1st Manchesters.

Perhaps someone might recognize a name?

When did the 1st Battalion reform?

Thanks again to Catherine for sharing this with us.

Offline charlie

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #76 on: April 07, 2016, 09:56:51 AM »
Hello Dave,
Thanks for posting the reverse. I had a look at the names and Sgt RA Gosselin TSR was KiA in France on 25.07.1944:

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2059169/GOSSELIN,%20ROBERT%20ANDREW

So the photo cannot be any later.

The 1st Bn was reconstituted in June 1942.

Charlie

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #77 on: April 07, 2016, 12:25:47 PM »
Thanks Charlie. Generally when I receive 'new' names the first place I visit is CWGC hoping I do not locate their names there.  I haven't had the opportunity yet with these names so the discovery of Robert Andrew Gosselin is very sad. I do hope no other names from this list are there. Six other soldiers from the Toronto Scots were also killed that day (July 25, 1944) along with Sgt. Gosselin.

Prior to receiving this list, in addition to Bill, I had two other lads identified as Toronto Scots - both back row, chap middle in white + the lad 4th from the right. Often the Canadian Virtual War Memorial offers additional info to that of CWGC such as photographs & for Gosselin it displays his grave but nothing else so unfortunately we can't make a positive ID.

I think your initial observation of when the photograph was taken still stands. Based on the other units listed - machine gunners course of some sort?

Thanks again.

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #78 on: April 23, 2016, 03:10:48 AM »
It was for his heroic actions April 23, 1944 (72 years ago today) near Cerreto Alto, Italy that resulted in S/Sgt. Daniel Serrick 2-1 1st Special Service Force (Black Devil's/Devil's Brigade) from Jollimore, Nova Scotia (enlisted 2/Mancs September 21, 1938) being posthumously awarded the American Silver Star for Gallantry March 29, 1945.

The Silver Star citation:

Leading a patrol within enemy firing range, while attempting to rescue a wounded comrade, Staff Sergeant Serrick left his patrol in the protection of a canal and began the search with the assistance of a medical aid man who being unarmed caused Staff Sergeant Serrick also to go weaponless. Proceeding across flat mine-covered terrain towards enemy positions, the two men were suddenly fired upon by a machinegun, which wounded the aid man.
Staff Sergeant Serrick, in the face of a hail of machinegun bullets, assisted the wounded man to the protection of the canal. He then returned to the field alone and continued the search while enemy artillery fired around him. Returning at darkness to his patrol, he went out a third time and did not return until convinced that the search was in vain.
During subsequent operations in Italy, Staff Sergeant Serrick was killed as a result of enemy action. His inspiring courage, loyalty and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military services.

End of Citation.

Dannie was KIA May 29, 1944 age 23 & is buried Beach Head War Cemetery, Anzio, Italy. The family received the medal in a simple ceremony held at the American Consulate in Halifax, Nova Scotia February 12, 1947.
Always Remembered...
« Last Edit: April 23, 2016, 11:21:14 PM by Dave1212 »

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #79 on: April 25, 2016, 07:27:22 PM »
This is a wonderful photograph of Cecil Laurence 'Pat' Duffey from Halifax, Nova Scotia. He enlisted in the 2/Mancs April  28,1939. After being wounded in France May 1940 Pat transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment in 1941. He served in Sicily & Italy where his war ended after being wounded a fifth time. He was still recovering from his injuries when he returned to Halifax in the Spring of 1945.

While training with the RCR in Scotland Pat met Margaret Woods & they later married in Halifax, NS November 1946. Bill Delaney was his best man & I must thank the Delaney Family once again for kindly sharing this photo from their collection.

After the war Pat served with the Halifax Fire Department for 34 years. He passed away May 28, 1981 age 61 & is buried Gates of Heaven Cemetery, Lower Sackville, NS.

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #80 on: April 26, 2016, 05:29:39 PM »
When I was delving further into Sgt. Gosselin's story, from a couple of posts ago, I inadvertently came across information that places another '100' member in the Toronto Scottish Regiment (M.G.).

Thomas H. Nolan along with Carl Anderson & Thomas McCarthy ('A' Company KIA May 21, 1940 France) all from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia enlisted in the 2/Mancs April 12, 1939. Evacuated from Dunkirk, Thomas & Carl Anderson transferred to the Toronto Scottish July/August 1941. Serving in 'D' Company Cpl. Nolan was wounded July 26, 1944 south of Caen. He had returned home by the Spring of 1945.

Though unconfirmed, I believe Thomas passed away in 1995 age 75 & is buried Holy Cross Cemetery, Halifax, NS.

Carl Anderson survived the war. He later settled in Boston, Mass. & we're still attempting to piece together his final years.

This brings the number to 5 of the men who have been identified as transferring to the Toronto Scottish from the 2/Mancs - Thomas Nolan, Carl Anderson, Bill Delaney, Art Rodgers & Mel Coppell.

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #81 on: July 06, 2016, 07:46:50 PM »
This is another wonderful scan from the family of Syd Goodman taken at Ladysmith Barracks no date but I believe between May - July 1939.

There's 168 men & with so many Canadians included, it's a great shot. I still have to place all identified (& there's many) onto paper but I'm hoping families of the British soldiers featured might see there family members. Also should anyone recognize the NCO's & Officers, that would be fantastic as well.

Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #82 on: July 07, 2016, 10:26:09 AM »

What a splendid photograph.  I can identify the senior members present.

Seated centre is Major GL (Bill) Usher.  Sitting on his left is Regimental Sergeant Major Allen.
Sitting on Major Usher's right is Company Sergeant Major L Allison, and next to him is that renowned soldier Sergeant Joe Stridgeon DCM.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2016, 10:28:39 AM by Robert Bonner »
Robert

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #83 on: July 07, 2016, 04:51:08 PM »
Thank you Robert. RSM Allen's name has actually come up from a couple of the families. Don Morrison (March '39 - 3rd row from the top, 8th from the left) wrote down some of his memories in later life & also mentions him (in high esteem). The introduction to these other men you identified means a great deal.

The earliest recruits I see here are from Feb '39 & the latest are from May '39. I don't see any of the '38 lads so would you agree with the May to July '39 likelihood as the time of the shot?

Thanks again Robert.

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #84 on: July 08, 2016, 05:53:11 AM »
Another from Syd Goodman's collection, this is an exercise book for a Private E. Martindale. He's not on my list as one of the '100' so I'm assuming he's a British mate of Syd's (March '39 - 3rd row from the top, 13th from the right in photo). I would also assume that he (Martindale) might very well be in the photo. Perhaps his name might be familiar to someone. 

Offline Robert Bonner

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #85 on: July 08, 2016, 11:42:33 AM »

Dave.
I think that May - June is more accurate.  In pages 48/49 of Ladysmith Baracks 1845 - 1958 there is a photograph of the Canadian Intake which is dated  24 May 1939. They were obviously now trained soldiers and ready for posting.  This new photo from Syd Goodman's collection shows the entire Recruit Company, possibly ready for their passing out parade at the end of basic training. Probably taken at about the same time.

In the text there is an item "Walter O'Hara, one of the Canadians, wrote in the July edition of the Regimental Journal.....My squad goes to Aldershot next month to join the 2nd Battalion."     Allowing for the inevitable delay between writing this and the publishing date of July I think that it is safe to assume that he wrote this in either late May or June.

Incidentally what a lot of boy soldiers squatting in the front row.
Robert

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #86 on: July 08, 2016, 04:08:59 PM »
Thanks Robert, the timeframe does make sense though the Walter O'Hara reference (the 1st recruit in the story) would have been from 1938. He enlisted Feb. 24, 1938 & his 'Recruit for the Regiment' letter was from July of that year. The flow of Canadians started after Walter's best friend Bill Adams arrived in August 1938. The cruel twist is that when Bill arrived in England, instead of 2nd Battalion Walter had been shipped to 1st Battalion & the two friends never got to serve together - Bill was KIA May 1940 France.

The May 24, 1939 photo of the 41 Canadians is one of my favourites. I have attached an improved scan of the exercise yard photo which features the same 41 men. It's brilliant to have the same people involved in two different settings. Being Empire Day, perhaps a matched set to show how these Canadians were already doing their bit.

Included in the front row of boy soldiers from the previous group photo are two 22 year olds - Gerald Crouse 3rd from left & Billy Delaney 6th from the right. Neither looks happy with the seating arrangements...

Thanks again Robert.

(I have placed names to the majority of faces in this photo.)
« Last Edit: July 12, 2016, 05:02:28 AM by Dave1212 »

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #87 on: September 27, 2016, 08:05:18 PM »
S/Sgt Daniel 'Dannie' Serrick (2-1) 1st Special Service Force KIA May 29, 1944 age 23.

Born September 1920 Jollimore, Nova Scotia.
Enlisted 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) ('B' Company)
September 21, 1938 (one of the 'Halifax 100').
Evacuated from Dunkirk May 31, 1940.
3 Troop No.5 Commando Jan-Oct 1941.
'C' Squadron 8th Canadian Recce Regiment (14th Canadian Hussars) 1941-1942.
2nd Company, 1st Regiment 1st Special Service Force 1942-1944
(arrived Helena. Montana December 1942).
Earned British (Ringway), Canadian (Fort Benning) & US (Helena) jump wings. 
Buried Beach Head War Cemetery, Anzio, Italy (XVII.A.3)
Posthumously awarded Silver Star for Gallantry - action dated April 23, 1944 near Cerreto Alto, Italy.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2016, 06:19:34 PM by Dave1212 »

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #88 on: October 01, 2016, 09:08:26 PM »

Note: Skip McCarthy was born October 6, 1909 & it seems fitting to repost his story as we draw closer to his birthday - remembering this artist/soldier who created such an iconic insignia that means so much to so many, past & present.

It was 80 years ago in 1936 when Francis William 'Skip' McCarthy designed the West Nova Scotia Regiment insignia. His 75th Lunenburg Regiment had merged with the 69th Annapolis Regiment & Skip's superiors, knowing of his artistic background & talent, tasked him to create the insignia for the new unit. (See attachment).

The difficult economic reality of the 1930’s frustrated many militia members in their failed attempts to join the regular army. When word reached Skip that men were being recruited in Halifax for the British Army he and two other West Nova ‘originals’ Arnold ‘Slim’ Carver and Gerald Crouse (both from Italy Cross, NS) headed for the city.

Successfully passing an interview and physical they were soon on their way to England. They enlisted in the 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) April 4, 1939. After war was declared, the 2/Mancs, the Divisional Machine Gun Battalion in the British 2nd Division left England reaching Cherbourg, France September 23, 1939. Stationed on the Maginot Line near the Belgium border they waited in the trenches they had dug for the inevitable German attack which finally commenced May 10, 1940.

Attached to 'D' Company, Skip served in a platoon with fellow Nova Scotian Clyde Cruickshanks as well as his mates Arnold Carver and Gerald Crouse. On May 26, 1940, performing rear guard actions that allowed others to proceed to the beaches of Dunkirk, Skip's platoon, after bitter fighting was overrun by superior German forces and forced to surrender. Arnold and Gerald managed to escape but Skip had been wounded in the leg and he along with Clyde became POWs ending up at Stalag XXA (located just south of the town of Thorun in Poland).

Years of forced manual labour, meager rations in squalid conditions compounded by diseases like jaundice and dysentry even the heartiest of men suffered. In January 1945 the Germans began the infamous 'Long March' of the already weakened POW’s towards Germany in order to flee the advancing Russians. In one of the coldest winters in years, the POWs were marched 20-40 km a day through 2 or 3 feet of snow and sub-freezing temperatures. Frost bite was severe and many died from disease. Shootings and beatings of those unable to keep up were frequent.

Their eventual liberation by American forces in April 1945 came too late for Skip – his health had failed. Repatriated home to Nova Scotia Skip was unable to resume a normal life. He passed away at the Nova Scotia Sanatorium in Kentville August 7th, 1947 from TB contracted while a POW. Skip was 38 years old. He is buried at the Trinity Anglican Cemetery, Liverpool NS.

Lest We Forget

Offline Dave1212

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Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #89 on: December 21, 2016, 01:49:17 PM »
Syd Goodman 'B' Company 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) from Ferguson's Cove, Nova Scotia recorded where he spent the seven Christmas' away from home.  He was 18 when he left Halifax in February 1939. His joy of being reunited with his family for Christmas 1946 must have been tempered by the fact his older brother Jack was absent having died while a POW 'H' Force Thailand/Burma Railway July 3, 1943 (9th Coast Regiment RA).

Syd's list:
Christmas 1939 Le Mans, France
Christmas 1940 Malton, Yorkshire, England
Christmas 1941 Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire, England
Christmas 1942 Poona (Pune), India
Christmas 1943 Belgaum, India
Christmas 1944 Kalewa, Burma
Christmas 1945 Birmingham, England

Syd passed away December 2, 1998 Halifax NS age 78. Buried Fort Massey Cemetery, Halifax, NS.