Author Topic: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946  (Read 42765 times)

Offline Dave1212

  • ****
  • Posts: 122
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #15 on: December 05, 2007, 01:53:00 AM »
That's our Walter. According to a caption on the back of a photo that Walter had sent to Tom McCarthy's family, Walter writes that he & another chap from Winnipeg, Manitoba were the only Canadians in the 1st Battalion. Names could include F.L. Cooper, Frank Morgan or C.L. Stevens. I'm hoping POW records might eventually shed light as to his identity.

Offline harribobs

  • Site Monkey
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,178
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #16 on: December 05, 2007, 09:44:17 AM »

from the halifax one hundred database

O'Hara   W   Walter   Halifax, NS   1st Regiment      POW Singapore 1942 - After the war served with the Royal Canadian Artillery. Past away 04/05/1996 Fredericton, NB - Age 78
“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
  to serve as a warning to others."

Offline Dave1212

  • ****
  • Posts: 122
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2007, 02:42:00 PM »
I had to share this email from Chris with you:

now we know about the halifax one hundred.....   did you know it happened in reverse 30 years earlier?
 
Captain O'Lerary from the RCR has contacted me and pointed me towards this link on their regimental site
 
http://thercr.ca/history/1900-1914/manchester_draft1.htm


I wasn’t aware of the story before & wouldn’t it be great to compile a list of the men involved – perhaps there already is one. The added feature for me was the RCR involvement. Mel Coppell’s father (my grandfather) served in the RCR from 1904 to 1925 (Rifle Brigade 1892-1904). In the third article - Sergeant Major Instructor Bonner (you’ll have to help us with this one Robert), towards the end of his piece, mentions my grandfather - ' in Fred Copples' Restaurant-the Coffee Bar of other days'. It’s always nice coming across great stuff like this when you’re not even looking for it!

We know at least one of the lads from our story, Cecil Laurence ‘Pat’ Duffy, after Dunkirk transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment & fought in Sicily & Italy where he was wounded five times! After the war Pat served with the Halifax Fire Department. Lt. Col. Willis of course also served in the RCR.  Another bond between regiments that should be remembered.

Thanks Chris.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2007, 02:12:11 AM by Dave1212 »

Offline harribobs

  • Site Monkey
  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 5,178
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2007, 11:10:54 PM »
i believe michael is compiling a list, so with his approval, i will post it to the main site when i have it  ;D
“It may be that your sole purpose in life is simply
  to serve as a warning to others."

Offline Dave1212

  • ****
  • Posts: 122
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #19 on: June 17, 2008, 05:38:54 PM »
I hope all is well. Sorry I have been unable to participate as much as I would have liked but I have enjoyed reading the forum & I am so happy to see the WWII section increasing in size & queries.

Awhile back I was reading ‘Where Are All The Madmen’ by Arthur Lane when I came upon a reference to a ‘Canada O’Hara’ (Chapter 1 pg. 12). From the ‘100’ story we know Walter O’Hara (the story’s first recruit) was one of two Canadians serving with the 1st so I wrote Arthur asking if Canada & Walter might be one in the same. Arthur kindly responded:

I knew Walter very well, I was a young old soldier, three years younger than him and had been in the army six years when he arrived in Singapore in November 1940, He came as a duty man (A private soldier) and fancied his hand at becoming a musician, unfortunately he could not read music so he was put in the drum section where I was serving as a drummer. In other words, a purveyor of music via bugle fife and drum. Walter was not very musically minded and was given a Timpani side drum to learn to play.

If there are any photographs of him he would stand out. Being a tall lad he stood out above the rest of the section. He was referred to as Canada by every one. Being tall and not English, there were many who tried to take the mickey. He took all their jokes and sarcasms without blinking an eye lash, he never ever retaliated aggressively. I have been in his company on many occasions but I don’t think I ever saw him drink beer or alcohol. He trained as a machine gunner in my group 16 platoon and the last time I saw or spoke to him was in January 42 as I was heading off to Gemas in Malaysia. I had lost my night glasses and he loaned me his.

In August 1995 I received a message from the Manchester regiment O C A informing me that Walter had been in contact and was trying to obtain some regimental regalia. Unfortunately he never called back or left an address.


Arthur believes Walter was on the first draft of POW ships to Japan after the surrender. I don’t have camp details & I have not located Walter’s family yet but this will still be nice to share with them when I do.

Another soldier included within my updated list – Norman ‘John’ Trueman – Arthur also remembers. He writes:

I knew him very well but had no idea he was a Canadian, He joined the Manchester regiment the year before I did, he served in Palestine. A quite man worked in Headquarters. In the orderly room and remained in HQ all through his POW time. I can not tell you much about him except to say that he was a quiet man who just got on with his job. In Palestine he was at one time seconded to Brigade, working in Wingates department…

Sadly John did not survive the ordeal & died 08/31/1945 & is buried Kranj War Cemetery, Singapore – Age 30. I came across John’s name in Canada’s Book of Remembrance & though I do not believe he is actually involved in the 100 story I felt obligated to record his name. I believe John must have been born in Canada however CWGC lists his parents from Gorton, Manchester. I’m thinking the Trueman family emigrated to Canada in the early 1900’s & then returned home perhaps due to WWI or economic conditions at the time with John being raised in Manchester. Hopefully we’ll hear from the Trueman family & learn more.

I must thank themonsstar for the maps of the German POW camps (POWS WW2 Section). On the old forum our experts provided wonderful information on three of the lads, Clyde Cruickshanks, Skip McCarthy & Bill Lambert – all captured at Dunkirk. I’ve included a link to the camp that Clyde & Skip were situated:
http://www.wartimememories.co.uk/pow/stalag20a.html

Great talking with you all again & I certainly hope I'll be back sooner than later…

Dave
« Last Edit: June 17, 2008, 07:58:26 PM by Dave1212 »

Offline Dave1212

  • ****
  • Posts: 122
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #20 on: September 23, 2008, 07:41:44 PM »
One of the family members involved in the ‘100’ story was recently in England & was able to visit the regiment archives. As a result we are now able to confirm fifty eight of the men with over forty having either regiment #’s or an enlistment date by their names. Another fourteen men are listed as ‘probable’ bringing the total to seventy two. The regiment # &/or enlistment date enables us to determine the actual timeline of events as well as travel groups. We are progressing nicely & a large part is due to the kind experts here at themanchesters.org. Thank you on behalf of the families of the men.

Cliff has had a recent hand in sharing with us some great detail about the 1st Battalion & specifically providing Walter O’Hara’s POW Liberation Questionnaire. A wonderful document to assist us in locating Walter’s family as well as learning more about what he & his mates endured during that time. Thank you so much Cliff. It is appreciated.

More to follow...
« Last Edit: September 23, 2008, 08:07:26 PM by Dave1212 »

Offline rafboy

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,130
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #21 on: September 26, 2008, 12:25:13 AM »
Dave
The thanks for Walter's Liberation Questionaire should go to Roy (themonsstar).  Roy did all the leg work and has provided me with copies of QL and POW Record cards to pass on to a couple of people.
Cliff
Cliff P Son of 3525679 Sgt Arthur Phillips 1st Bn Manchester Regiment and RAPC

Offline Dave1212

  • ****
  • Posts: 122
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #22 on: September 29, 2008, 10:14:45 PM »
Thanks Cliff & a very special thank you to Roy. This is the quality teamwork & generosity that makes this forum so great. Cheers guys!

Offline Dave1212

  • ****
  • Posts: 122
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2008, 03:38:31 AM »
Remembering Heroes of the '100'

Two groupings – those included in photo & those yet without a visual record

Attached Photograph L-to-R:

Private William ‘Bill’ Douglas Adams (Halifax/Antigonish, Nova Scotia)
3530361
KIA between 05/10/1940 – 05/19/1940 Manchester Regiment - Age 22
Buried: Dunkirk Town Cemetery, France

Lance Corporal Sydney Leonard Barwick (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
3530919
KIA 04/14/1943 44th Royal Tank Regiment RAC - Age 33
Buried: Florence War Cemetery, Italy
 
Lance Corporal Clyde R. Cruickshanks (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
3530796
POW 1940-1945 Manchester Regiment Camp Thorn Podgorz , Poland
KIA 11/27/1950 The Royal Ulster Rifles - Age 32
Buried: UN Memorial Cemetery, Pusan, Korea
 
Sergeant Francis William ‘Skip’ McCarthy (Liverpool/Bridgewater, Nova Scotia)
3530850
POW 1940-1945 Manchester Regiment Camp Thorn Podgorz , Poland
Died 08/07/1947 Nova Scotia Sanatorium, Kentville , NS - Age 38 (TB)
Buried: Trinity Anglican Cemetery, Liverpool, NS
(Pre-war designed West Nova Scotia Regiment insignia)
 
Private Thomas McCarthy (Dartmouth, Nova Scotia)
3530871
KIA 05/21/1940 Manchester Regiment - Age 25
Buried: Dunkirk Town Cemetery, France
 
Lance Corporal Ross Samuel ‘Sock’ Rutherford (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
Enlisted in the Manchesters early 1939
Died 08/03/1945 8th Infantry Battalion, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps - Age 31
(the result of a motorcycle accident)
Buried: Holten Canadian War Cemetery, The Netherlands
 
Staff Sergeant Daniel ‘Dannie’ Serrick (Jollimore, Nova Scotia)
3530403
KIA 05/29/1944 2nd Company 1st Regiment, First Special Service Force - Age 23
Buried: Beach Head War Cemetery, Anzio , Italy
Awarded American Silver Star for Gallantry
 
No Photograph Available:
 
Gunner John ‘Jack’ Claydon Goodman (Ferguson’s Cove, Nova Scotia)
(one of the ‘100’ who opted for the RA rather than the Manchesters – older brother to Syd 2nd Manchesters 1939-1946)
Died while POW 07/03/1943 9th Coast Regiment, Royal Artillery - Age 28 (Thailand-Burma Railway)
Buried: Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, Thailand
 
Fusilier Harold Morris (Melville Cove, Nova Scotia)
3530508
Died while POW 01/07/1943 1st Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers – Age 28
Remembered with Honour Ragoon Memorial, Burma
 
Flight Officer David Albert Alton Romans (Glace Bay/Melville Cove, Nova Scotia)
(one of the ‘100’ who opted for the RAF rather than the Manchesters)
Shot Down 09/08/1941 Royal Air Force – Age 21
Buried: Bygland Cemetery, Norway
First Nova Scotian to be awarded DFC in WWII
 
Private Martin Rothwell (Killed in same action as Thomas McCarthy)
KIA 05/13/1940 Manchester Regiment – Age 30
Remembered with Honour Dunkirk Memorial
 
Private Norman John Trueman (Canada’s Book of Remembrance)
3527492
Died after being POW 08/31/1945 Manchester Regiment – Age 30
Buried: Kranj War Cemetery, Singapore
 
Lest We Forget

Offline Dave1212

  • ****
  • Posts: 122
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2009, 05:39:16 PM »
On January 22, 2009 George Lampier (3530404) peacefully passed away here in Halifax NS at the age of 88. George was one of the first recruits to enlist in this story, along with his mates Mel Coppell & Dannie Serrick on September 21, 1938.

It was a privilege to have been invited into his home on numerous occasions to discuss his experiences & memories of his time in the 2nd Manchesters (B/5 platoon).

Sent to France in September 1939, George was wounded near the Albert Canal between the dates of May 24-26, 1940. After recovering from wounds to his head & shoulder in December 1940 George was transferred to the 5th Devonshire Regiment to serve as an instructor. From there he went to the 76th Anti Tank Regiment, 86th Anti Tank Regiment & finally in 1942 he transferred to the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery where he served until his retirement in 1965. He received his Canadian jump wings after the war.

George was a wonderful gentleman who was fiercely proud of his service to his country & to the lads who fought beside him.

Thank you George. RIP my friend.

Offline Wendi

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3,688
  • Peeking into the past
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #25 on: February 18, 2009, 08:40:35 AM »
Hi Dave

I'm sorry to hear your sad news.  It makes what you are doing in regard to these men and their experiences all the more important.

May they Rest in Peace.

Wendi
"Believe nothing, no matter where you read it, or who said it!  No matter if I have said it, unless it agrees with your own reason and with your own common sense" ~ Buddha

Offline Robert Bonner

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,386
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2010, 11:15:21 AM »
I discovered the following letter in the  Regimental Gazette.  It  describes the beginning of this wonderful story of the Halifax 100.  I have sent a copy  to Dave in Canada who believes that the author was probably Walter O'Hara (3529834).

          "About a year ago I decided to fulfil a lifelong ambition and enlist into the British Army. I was then working on a farm in Nova Scotia, Canada.  Soon after I got a new job and met a Mr Woodcock, an old soldier of the Manchester Regiment.  He told me a great deal about the Regiment and its history and introduced me to Lt Col Willis – who had served in the Manchester Regiment,
Lt Col Willis made it possible for me to join the Manchester Regiment. He wrote to the officer commanding the Depot in England and the various recruiting authorities. 

          When my acceptance seemed certain he got me a job on the Manchester Citizen as a cattleman.  I had to wait to get this job and four ships sailed before a vacancy occurred.  At last the day arrived for me to leave Canada to join the Manchester Regiment.  I could hardly contain my excitement for I had always wanted to go to England and join the Army.
I left Halifax on 12th February and after 12 days the boat steamed into Liverpool. Although I had signed on as a cattleman I was given much easier work to do on the ship.

          At Liverpool there was a letter from the Recruiting Officer, giving me further instructions, and at Manchester I was met by a sergeant of the Regiment who took me to the Depot. I have now done nearly four months of training and I honestly enjoy life as a soldier. I never experienced at home the value of physical training – one of the most important subjects at the Depot. We receive instruction at the Depot in all kinds of training so that when we leave we are ready to join the battalion as trained soldiers.  My squad goes to Aldershot, the largest military training centre in England to join the 2nd Battalion of the Regiment next month.  The regiment is one of the four fully mechanised Machine Gun Regiments in the Army so we should have plenty of interesting things to see and learn when we get there.

          I hope many of my countrymen will do the same as I and join the Regiment, for I know they would enjoy the life as I enjoy it.
          A Canadian Lad." 
 
(Published in the Regimental Gazette of July 1938)                                     
Robert

Offline Robert Bonner

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,386
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #27 on: August 15, 2010, 04:39:38 PM »
Yet another anecdote re our splendid Halifax 100 which we did not know.

In 1950 Clarence Hook of 327 Brunswick Street, Halifax was instrumental with William Delaney in organising at the latter's home a stag party of ex-Manchesters, thus initiating the Halifax branch of the Old Comrades Association      Their practical demonstration of their affection for the Manchester Regiment was tremendously appreciated.


Robert

catharriet

  • Guest
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #28 on: August 19, 2010, 02:53:01 AM »
Interesting story!  Doesn't suprise me one bit that Dad helped to organize something like that.  It also wouldn't suprise me if Cecil (Pat) Duffy didn't have a hand in it too! 

Offline Dave1212

  • ****
  • Posts: 122
Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
« Reply #29 on: August 23, 2011, 07:32:52 PM »
I have been remiss in my updates to the group regarding the '100' story & for that I apologize. The research is still going strong & I'll pleased to report that this Sunday August 28, 2011 we'll be holding the first 'Meet & Greet' afternoon for the families & friends of these men at the Royal Canadian Legion in Fairview NS.

All signs indicate a good turnout (of course the weather now states we may be on the tailend of Hurricane Irene) but short of that, it will be a wonderful opportunity to celebrate these men & the Manchester Regiment.

I will post photos from the event as well as update you once the function is done. While I haven't posted for awhile I still read the forum on a regular basis & it's wonderful to see all of the new members!

Talk to you soon.

Cheers,

Dave
« Last Edit: August 24, 2011, 01:06:53 AM by Dave1212 »