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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by CarolineBoo on Today at 01:07:03 PM »
Thanks so much for all your insights and corrections.I had no idea that Frank stayed in the Army until the end of 1919 or that he was transferred to the Cheshire Regiment.

I am so pleased that he didn’t join the Cheshire’s until mid-1919  -  Both because he was really keen on being with ‘the lads from Shaw’ and (selfishly) because I thought you might toss me out of this wonderful and knowledgeable forum on the Manchesters!

I agree it must have been strange fighting in a war zone that was largely discounted and ignored both during the war and afterwards.  I don’t know if any of you have read Lena Ashwell’s book, ‘Modern Troubadours’, she was the suffragist, actress and impresario behind the professional concert parties in WWI.  When she and her party visited Malta to tour the hospitals and perform concerts - she has a lot of interesting things to say about the soldiers stories from Salonika and how they would rather be on the Western Front.  The link to her book, free to download,  is https://archive.org/details/moderntroubadour00ashwuoft

As part of my research I also read the Manchester Guardian archives and The Times - it is amazing how little reporting there was about the war in Salonika.  Though in fairness, much of the time it was more skirmishes than battles and more air fighting than ground combat. It also seemed as though the British role was to distract the Bulgarians while main assaults were conducted by the French and others - but that might be unfair.

Thanks again.  By the way, from tomorrow, we are starting to post Frank’s diary entries daily - on their 100th anniversary of being written.
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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by PhilipG on Today at 10:15:42 AM »
Caroline,

The Macedonia campaign by the British Salonika Forces has been described as "the sideshow that ended the war".   Clearly, their contribution to the war effort was hardly known.   Their battle casualties numbered some 23,000, whilst their non-battle casualties were just over 481,000, of which figure 198,000 were cases of malaria.

Upon their return to France, the battalions were asked if they had done any fighting and if they had been "over the top".    The BSF appear to have been a forgotten army - cf. the British 14th Army in WW2. PhilipG.
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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by charlie on Today at 09:38:12 AM »
Caroline,
Your Grandfather was not conscripted, having volunteered under the Derby scheme he was mobilized.
From the Long long trail:

„Men who attested under the Derby Scheme, who were accepted for service and chose to defer it were classified as being in “Class A”. Those who agreed to immediate service were “Class B”. The Class A men were paid a day’s army pay for the day they attested; were given a grey armband with a red crown as a sign that they had so volunteered; were officially transferred into Section B Army Reserve; and were sent back to their homes and jobs until they were called up.“

Charlie

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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by charlie on December 13, 2017, 08:46:44 PM »
Welcome to the forum Caroline.

The 9th Bn War Diary entry for 08.05.1919 records that 27 Other Ranks, retainable personnel and volunteers for the Army of Occupation, were transferred to 1/6th Bn Cheshire Regt. His late discharge date of 04.11.1919 would suggest he was one of the retained personnel.

Charlie


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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by timberman on December 13, 2017, 02:40:18 PM »
I did struggle with the medal roll until I put in the
Cheshire Regiment, that were I found a lot of
13th/9th Bn soldiers.

Timberman
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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by CarolineBoo on December 13, 2017, 02:34:50 PM »
Thanks so much for all this information.  It is incredibly helpful of you.   I use Ancestry but failed to find any of this!
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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by timberman on December 13, 2017, 02:31:28 PM »

The information I've given you is from his
Medal Index Card and the Medals Rolls both
can be found on Ancestry.

Timberman 
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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by CarolineBoo on December 13, 2017, 02:25:23 PM »
This is really interesting!

Frank had rheumatic fever in Salonika and was in and out of military hospitals / field ambulances in Salonika and then in France.  Just after the war ended his unit was in Belgium and he was sent on home leave. The rest of his unit was marching off to be part of the occupying force in Germany. His diary ends the day he gets back to Shaw. 

Perhaps he was then invalided out while on leave?  Would he have been transferred to do more war work with the Cheshires at that point?  He never mentioned leaving the Manchesters - and was always very keen on being with the 'Shaw lads'.

After the war he had various operations in London and Manchester - ultimately having his knee cap removed and his leg fixed.  He walked with a cane for the rest of his life.
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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by PhilipG on December 13, 2017, 02:15:05 PM »
Caroline,

The Official History of the Great War reports:    "The most formidable, the almost unconquerable foe was malaria."   Perhaps this was the reason for the SWB.   PhilipG.
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Hello / Re: HELLO Frank's Diary 1917-18
« Last post by timberman on December 13, 2017, 02:08:47 PM »
I don't know the answer but someone else may know.

In the medals roll there are a lot of 13th/9th Bn soldiers
that had their medals issued by the Cheshire Regiment.

Timberman
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