The Manchester Regiment Forum

World War 2 => 1939 - 1945 => Topic started by: Dave1212 on November 14, 2007, 02:36:07 PM

Title: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on November 14, 2007, 02:36:07 PM
Sorry, took a wrong turn at Albuquerque – better late than never…

This story is still gathering momentum as family members of the lads continue to join us to share wonderful stories & items from their family archives.

The new forum looks great & though outside events took me away from the latter days of the previous site, I look forward to future posts. Hope all is well & will report more in the days to come…

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Wendi on November 14, 2007, 03:12:47 PM
Dave Welcome back  ;D

Thought it might have been the snow held you up!  Glad to hear the research is coming along so well.  Shame we lost so much with the fall of the previous provider, but glad you agree, we have rallied well  ;D

Wendi  :)
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on November 21, 2007, 01:04:41 AM
Thanks Wendi. It was a bit disappointing losing the old provider – we all spent so much time there but I agree, seeing the group land running certainly makes me look forward to our new home & future reading.

It’s been about a year since I initially contacted Chris about this story & its growth has been amazing. Thanks to the kind team of contributors here at my favorite website along with the families & friends of the lads that contacted me after Peter’s article came out back in May, well, it’s been an incredible learning experience for me.

Hearing the stories about them or seeing their faces for the first time via photographs kindly shared by their loving families, has been, as I wrote previously, like meeting old friends for the first time.

We’ve also recently received some new information about Lt. Col. Willis, the man responsible for this unique recruitment drive. New names have been added to the list & the more the merrier I say!

We have some more photos & clippings to share if you like. I have many, many questions for our experts & look forward to our next year. Thanks again…
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: tisgrannie on November 21, 2007, 07:04:35 AM
Hi Its been a great experience to share, thanks for sharing it with us. I miss being able to look at the terrific factual story. Its was like a good book. Go back to the favourite bits or facts. Hopefully we can get a concise story so far, to start off your next year with us. Great having you around!
kind regards
tisgrannie
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Wendi on November 21, 2007, 08:18:44 PM
............and we LOVE photos and clippings  ;D ;D
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on November 27, 2007, 02:42:37 AM
It’s hard to believe as we near 2008; it marks the 70th anniversary of the beginning of this story. The fact that thousands of Canadians joined the British Forces prior to & during the Second World War is already well documented. I find this particular recruitment drive – involving mostly Nova Scotians & the Manchester Regiment a special story & one that has largely been forgotten - except by the family members of the young men who took part (& our friends here of course). It’s too good a story not to share!

I’ve read newspaper clippings that claim anywhere between fifty five & one hundred sixty five men were involved from early 1938 right up to the commencement of hostilities in September 1939. At this stage of the research I’m thinking it’s somewhere in the middle. As we progress, I will share some of the interesting details of the lads but to start our story I think it’s important to talk a little of the man responsible for orchestrating this drive – Lt. Col. Robert Billopp Willis (1877-1953).

We’ve received some wonderful new information from the Willis Family & will share more once we get the okay. It sounds like he had an interesting career in the Canadian & British army but the key is the five years Willis served as a lieutenant with the Manchester Regiment from 1900-1905. Connections made during this time must have assisted the recruitment initiative based in Halifax, NS thirty three years later. Without Willis, this story would not have united these men with the Manchester Regiment.

I’m not sure if the process for posting clippings/photos has changed or not but I will send Chris a clipping from the Halifax Herald from1946 (no actual date yet) which provides a better background description of the story. I grew up reading this clipping over & over & over. I always wanted to know more about these men. Written by H.A. Mitchell, it’s where ‘The Halifax Hundred’ name originated. I was born in Halifax but being a military kid I grew up in Toronto & Ottawa, Ontario. This story made me so proud to be from Nova Scotia.

A couple of points regarding the article: I believe the 1937 references ought to read 1938. Not 100% certain but I’ll keep you posted.
The DSO reference to Willis, I can’t confirm. An earlier post @ the old provider (sorry but I can’t recall who shared the info) rules out his Manchester time & the RCR records do not have him listed either.
 
More to follow…
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: tisgrannie on November 27, 2007, 07:13:15 AM
Thank you so much. I am especially keen as my mother was a Willis but from Belfast. Not connected I don't think, but adds a nice link. Its fabulous when people are interested in specific things. You become an authority on the subject. Its University Challenge stuff. "My specialist subject is the Halifax Hundred" Away you go and get all the answers correct.
Not sure if you know about that programme.
I look forward to the next chapter in this tale of dedicated men from Nova Scotia.
best wishes
tisgrannie
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: harribobs on November 27, 2007, 11:02:48 AM
dave has sent me the newspaper clipping, i think we had it on the old forum but not on the main site, i'll post it here this evening
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: tisgrannie on November 27, 2007, 09:12:03 PM
That would be great harribob.
Thanks
tisgrannie
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: harribobs on November 27, 2007, 10:18:43 PM
(http://harribobs.smugmug.com/photos/226209298-O.jpg)
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on November 27, 2007, 11:38:47 PM
Thanks Chris...
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: tisgrannie on November 28, 2007, 05:24:31 PM
Thanks so much for that, really appreciate it.
tisgrannie
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: harribobs on December 01, 2007, 12:44:30 AM
photo links!

http://themanchesters.org/forum/index.php?topic=301.0 (http://themanchesters.org/forum/index.php?topic=301.0)

now if you want to link a photo into this thread, go to the halifax 100 photos, right click on the one you want and copy the image location, click the picture icon above this box and you get (with the spaces i've added)

[ img ] [ /img ]

paste the location between the two sets of brackets and bobs yer uncle
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on December 04, 2007, 08:19:02 PM
The men had to pass a physical screening process before acceptance overseas. Syd Goodman’s family shared how an earlier attempt to join the Canadian Army had been thwarted by failing the eye exam. Syd’s solution was ensuring that for his next test he memorized the entire eye chart!
Syd’s signing bonus was a sack of potatoes. His transport from Halifax was aboard a cattle boat. Ray Goodhew’s family also shared this similar transport story so I hope we’re able to soon confirm both men came over together.
Syd, Ray & Clary Hook were three of the lads who remained with the regiment throughout the war serving, after Dunkirk, in Burma & India. I knew a handful stayed with the Manchester’s but to have three confirmed so early in our search has been a nice surprise.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: liverpool annie on December 04, 2007, 09:03:06 PM


I came across this soldier .... would he be one of yours or is this Manchester something entirely different ??  :-\


Last Name - O'HARA
First Name - Walter E.
Date Deceased - April 5, 1996
Age - 78
Rank - Warrant Officer
Service Number - SF39076
Units - 1 Manchester Regiment Royal Canadian Artillery
Period of Service - World War 2

Legion Branch - Fredericton Branch
Location - Fredericton, New Brunswick

http://www.legionmagazine.com/lastpost/details.asp?alpha=O&offset=500&LastPostData_ID=35981

Annie  :)
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on December 05, 2007, 01:53:00 AM
That's our Walter. According to a caption on the back of a photo that Walter had sent to Tom McCarthy's family, Walter writes that he & another chap from Winnipeg, Manitoba were the only Canadians in the 1st Battalion. Names could include F.L. Cooper, Frank Morgan or C.L. Stevens. I'm hoping POW records might eventually shed light as to his identity.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: harribobs on December 05, 2007, 09:44:17 AM

from the halifax one hundred database

O'Hara   W   Walter   Halifax, NS   1st Regiment      POW Singapore 1942 - After the war served with the Royal Canadian Artillery. Past away 04/05/1996 Fredericton, NB - Age 78
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on December 11, 2007, 02:42:00 PM
I had to share this email from Chris with you:

now we know about the halifax one hundred.....   did you know it happened in reverse 30 years earlier?
 
Captain O'Lerary from the RCR has contacted me and pointed me towards this link on their regimental site
 
http://thercr.ca/history/1900-1914/manchester_draft1.htm


I wasn’t aware of the story before & wouldn’t it be great to compile a list of the men involved – perhaps there already is one. The added feature for me was the RCR involvement. Mel Coppell’s father (my grandfather) served in the RCR from 1904 to 1925 (Rifle Brigade 1892-1904). In the third article - Sergeant Major Instructor Bonner (you’ll have to help us with this one Robert), towards the end of his piece, mentions my grandfather - ' in Fred Copples' Restaurant-the Coffee Bar of other days'. It’s always nice coming across great stuff like this when you’re not even looking for it!

We know at least one of the lads from our story, Cecil Laurence ‘Pat’ Duffy, after Dunkirk transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment & fought in Sicily & Italy where he was wounded five times! After the war Pat served with the Halifax Fire Department. Lt. Col. Willis of course also served in the RCR.  Another bond between regiments that should be remembered.

Thanks Chris.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: harribobs on December 11, 2007, 11:10:54 PM
i believe michael is compiling a list, so with his approval, i will post it to the main site when i have it  ;D
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on June 17, 2008, 05:38:54 PM
I hope all is well. Sorry I have been unable to participate as much as I would have liked but I have enjoyed reading the forum & I am so happy to see the WWII section increasing in size & queries.

Awhile back I was reading ‘Where Are All The Madmen’ by Arthur Lane when I came upon a reference to a ‘Canada O’Hara’ (Chapter 1 pg. 12). From the ‘100’ story we know Walter O’Hara (the story’s first recruit) was one of two Canadians serving with the 1st so I wrote Arthur asking if Canada & Walter might be one in the same. Arthur kindly responded:

I knew Walter very well, I was a young old soldier, three years younger than him and had been in the army six years when he arrived in Singapore in November 1940, He came as a duty man (A private soldier) and fancied his hand at becoming a musician, unfortunately he could not read music so he was put in the drum section where I was serving as a drummer. In other words, a purveyor of music via bugle fife and drum. Walter was not very musically minded and was given a Timpani side drum to learn to play.

If there are any photographs of him he would stand out. Being a tall lad he stood out above the rest of the section. He was referred to as Canada by every one. Being tall and not English, there were many who tried to take the mickey. He took all their jokes and sarcasms without blinking an eye lash, he never ever retaliated aggressively. I have been in his company on many occasions but I don’t think I ever saw him drink beer or alcohol. He trained as a machine gunner in my group 16 platoon and the last time I saw or spoke to him was in January 42 as I was heading off to Gemas in Malaysia. I had lost my night glasses and he loaned me his.

In August 1995 I received a message from the Manchester regiment O C A informing me that Walter had been in contact and was trying to obtain some regimental regalia. Unfortunately he never called back or left an address.


Arthur believes Walter was on the first draft of POW ships to Japan after the surrender. I don’t have camp details & I have not located Walter’s family yet but this will still be nice to share with them when I do.

Another soldier included within my updated list – Norman ‘John’ Trueman – Arthur also remembers. He writes:

I knew him very well but had no idea he was a Canadian, He joined the Manchester regiment the year before I did, he served in Palestine. A quite man worked in Headquarters. In the orderly room and remained in HQ all through his POW time. I can not tell you much about him except to say that he was a quiet man who just got on with his job. In Palestine he was at one time seconded to Brigade, working in Wingates department…

Sadly John did not survive the ordeal & died 08/31/1945 & is buried Kranj War Cemetery, Singapore – Age 30. I came across John’s name in Canada’s Book of Remembrance & though I do not believe he is actually involved in the 100 story I felt obligated to record his name. I believe John must have been born in Canada however CWGC lists his parents from Gorton, Manchester. I’m thinking the Trueman family emigrated to Canada in the early 1900’s & then returned home perhaps due to WWI or economic conditions at the time with John being raised in Manchester. Hopefully we’ll hear from the Trueman family & learn more.

I must thank themonsstar for the maps of the German POW camps (POWS WW2 Section). On the old forum our experts provided wonderful information on three of the lads, Clyde Cruickshanks, Skip McCarthy & Bill Lambert – all captured at Dunkirk. I’ve included a link to the camp that Clyde & Skip were situated:
http://www.wartimememories.co.uk/pow/stalag20a.html

Great talking with you all again & I certainly hope I'll be back sooner than later…

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on September 23, 2008, 07:41:44 PM
One of the family members involved in the ‘100’ story was recently in England & was able to visit the regiment archives. As a result we are now able to confirm fifty eight of the men with over forty having either regiment #’s or an enlistment date by their names. Another fourteen men are listed as ‘probable’ bringing the total to seventy two. The regiment # &/or enlistment date enables us to determine the actual timeline of events as well as travel groups. We are progressing nicely & a large part is due to the kind experts here at themanchesters.org. Thank you on behalf of the families of the men.

Cliff has had a recent hand in sharing with us some great detail about the 1st Battalion & specifically providing Walter O’Hara’s POW Liberation Questionnaire. A wonderful document to assist us in locating Walter’s family as well as learning more about what he & his mates endured during that time. Thank you so much Cliff. It is appreciated.

More to follow...
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: rafboy on September 26, 2008, 12:25:13 AM
Dave
The thanks for Walter's Liberation Questionaire should go to Roy (themonsstar).  Roy did all the leg work and has provided me with copies of QL and POW Record cards to pass on to a couple of people.
Cliff
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on September 29, 2008, 10:14:45 PM
Thanks Cliff & a very special thank you to Roy. This is the quality teamwork & generosity that makes this forum so great. Cheers guys!
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on November 06, 2008, 03:38:31 AM
Remembering Heroes of the '100'

Two groupings – those included in photo & those yet without a visual record

Attached Photograph L-to-R:

Private William ‘Bill’ Douglas Adams (Halifax/Antigonish, Nova Scotia)
3530361
KIA between 05/10/1940 – 05/19/1940 Manchester Regiment - Age 22
Buried: Dunkirk Town Cemetery, France

Lance Corporal Sydney Leonard Barwick (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
3530919
KIA 04/14/1943 44th Royal Tank Regiment RAC - Age 33
Buried: Florence War Cemetery, Italy
 
Lance Corporal Clyde R. Cruickshanks (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
3530796
POW 1940-1945 Manchester Regiment Camp Thorn Podgorz , Poland
KIA 11/27/1950 The Royal Ulster Rifles - Age 32
Buried: UN Memorial Cemetery, Pusan, Korea
 
Sergeant Francis William ‘Skip’ McCarthy (Liverpool/Bridgewater, Nova Scotia)
3530850
POW 1940-1945 Manchester Regiment Camp Thorn Podgorz , Poland
Died 08/07/1947 Nova Scotia Sanatorium, Kentville , NS - Age 38 (TB)
Buried: Trinity Anglican Cemetery, Liverpool, NS
(Pre-war designed West Nova Scotia Regiment insignia)
 
Private Thomas McCarthy (Dartmouth, Nova Scotia)
3530871
KIA 05/21/1940 Manchester Regiment - Age 25
Buried: Dunkirk Town Cemetery, France
 
Lance Corporal Ross Samuel ‘Sock’ Rutherford (Halifax, Nova Scotia)
Enlisted in the Manchesters early 1939
Died 08/03/1945 8th Infantry Battalion, Royal Canadian Army Service Corps - Age 31
(the result of a motorcycle accident)
Buried: Holten Canadian War Cemetery, The Netherlands
 
Staff Sergeant Daniel ‘Dannie’ Serrick (Jollimore, Nova Scotia)
3530403
KIA 05/29/1944 2nd Company 1st Regiment, First Special Service Force - Age 23
Buried: Beach Head War Cemetery, Anzio , Italy
Awarded American Silver Star for Gallantry
 
No Photograph Available:
 
Gunner John ‘Jack’ Claydon Goodman (Ferguson’s Cove, Nova Scotia)
(one of the ‘100’ who opted for the RA rather than the Manchesters – older brother to Syd 2nd Manchesters 1939-1946)
Died while POW 07/03/1943 9th Coast Regiment, Royal Artillery - Age 28 (Thailand-Burma Railway)
Buried: Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, Thailand
 
Fusilier Harold Morris (Melville Cove, Nova Scotia)
3530508
Died while POW 01/07/1943 1st Battalion, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers – Age 28
Remembered with Honour Ragoon Memorial, Burma
 
Flight Officer David Albert Alton Romans (Glace Bay/Melville Cove, Nova Scotia)
(one of the ‘100’ who opted for the RAF rather than the Manchesters)
Shot Down 09/08/1941 Royal Air Force – Age 21
Buried: Bygland Cemetery, Norway
First Nova Scotian to be awarded DFC in WWII
 
Private Martin Rothwell (Killed in same action as Thomas McCarthy)
KIA 05/13/1940 Manchester Regiment – Age 30
Remembered with Honour Dunkirk Memorial
 
Private Norman John Trueman (Canada’s Book of Remembrance)
3527492
Died after being POW 08/31/1945 Manchester Regiment – Age 30
Buried: Kranj War Cemetery, Singapore
 
Lest We Forget
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on February 16, 2009, 05:39:16 PM
On January 22, 2009 George Lampier (3530404) peacefully passed away here in Halifax NS at the age of 88. George was one of the first recruits to enlist in this story, along with his mates Mel Coppell & Dannie Serrick on September 21, 1938.

It was a privilege to have been invited into his home on numerous occasions to discuss his experiences & memories of his time in the 2nd Manchesters (B/5 platoon).

Sent to France in September 1939, George was wounded near the Albert Canal between the dates of May 24-26, 1940. After recovering from wounds to his head & shoulder in December 1940 George was transferred to the 5th Devonshire Regiment to serve as an instructor. From there he went to the 76th Anti Tank Regiment, 86th Anti Tank Regiment & finally in 1942 he transferred to the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery where he served until his retirement in 1965. He received his Canadian jump wings after the war.

George was a wonderful gentleman who was fiercely proud of his service to his country & to the lads who fought beside him.

Thank you George. RIP my friend.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Wendi on February 18, 2009, 08:40:35 AM
Hi Dave

I'm sorry to hear your sad news.  It makes what you are doing in regard to these men and their experiences all the more important.

May they Rest in Peace.

Wendi
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Robert Bonner on July 15, 2010, 11:15:21 AM
I discovered the following letter in the  Regimental Gazette.  It  describes the beginning of this wonderful story of the Halifax 100.  I have sent a copy  to Dave in Canada who believes that the author was probably Walter O'Hara (3529834).

          "About a year ago I decided to fulfil a lifelong ambition and enlist into the British Army. I was then working on a farm in Nova Scotia, Canada.  Soon after I got a new job and met a Mr Woodcock, an old soldier of the Manchester Regiment.  He told me a great deal about the Regiment and its history and introduced me to Lt Col Willis – who had served in the Manchester Regiment,
Lt Col Willis made it possible for me to join the Manchester Regiment. He wrote to the officer commanding the Depot in England and the various recruiting authorities. 

          When my acceptance seemed certain he got me a job on the Manchester Citizen as a cattleman.  I had to wait to get this job and four ships sailed before a vacancy occurred.  At last the day arrived for me to leave Canada to join the Manchester Regiment.  I could hardly contain my excitement for I had always wanted to go to England and join the Army.
I left Halifax on 12th February and after 12 days the boat steamed into Liverpool. Although I had signed on as a cattleman I was given much easier work to do on the ship.

          At Liverpool there was a letter from the Recruiting Officer, giving me further instructions, and at Manchester I was met by a sergeant of the Regiment who took me to the Depot. I have now done nearly four months of training and I honestly enjoy life as a soldier. I never experienced at home the value of physical training – one of the most important subjects at the Depot. We receive instruction at the Depot in all kinds of training so that when we leave we are ready to join the battalion as trained soldiers.  My squad goes to Aldershot, the largest military training centre in England to join the 2nd Battalion of the Regiment next month.  The regiment is one of the four fully mechanised Machine Gun Regiments in the Army so we should have plenty of interesting things to see and learn when we get there.

          I hope many of my countrymen will do the same as I and join the Regiment, for I know they would enjoy the life as I enjoy it.
          A Canadian Lad." 
 
(Published in the Regimental Gazette of July 1938)                                     
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Robert Bonner on August 15, 2010, 04:39:38 PM
Yet another anecdote re our splendid Halifax 100 which we did not know.

In 1950 Clarence Hook of 327 Brunswick Street, Halifax was instrumental with William Delaney in organising at the latter's home a stag party of ex-Manchesters, thus initiating the Halifax branch of the Old Comrades Association      Their practical demonstration of their affection for the Manchester Regiment was tremendously appreciated.


Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: catharriet on August 19, 2010, 02:53:01 AM
Interesting story!  Doesn't suprise me one bit that Dad helped to organize something like that.  It also wouldn't suprise me if Cecil (Pat) Duffy didn't have a hand in it too! 
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on August 23, 2011, 07:32:52 PM
I have been remiss in my updates to the group regarding the '100' story & for that I apologize. The research is still going strong & I'll pleased to report that this Sunday August 28, 2011 we'll be holding the first 'Meet & Greet' afternoon for the families & friends of these men at the Royal Canadian Legion in Fairview NS.

All signs indicate a good turnout (of course the weather now states we may be on the tailend of Hurricane Irene) but short of that, it will be a wonderful opportunity to celebrate these men & the Manchester Regiment.

I will post photos from the event as well as update you once the function is done. While I haven't posted for awhile I still read the forum on a regular basis & it's wonderful to see all of the new members!

Talk to you soon.

Cheers,

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Robert Bonner on August 28, 2011, 06:51:51 PM
Dve.

A belated response to yours.  We all wait to read about your 'Meet and Greet' occasion and hope that it all went very smoothly.

Best wishes.
Robert
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: mack on August 28, 2011, 08:03:19 PM
hiya dave
sorry i missed your reply,hope the day was a great success for you all.

mack ;D
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on August 30, 2011, 04:08:51 PM
Our first ‘Meet & Greet’ afternoon Sunday August 28, 2011 was a wonderful success. Despite Hurricane Irene leering offshore, the turnout was impressive & it was a joy for me to meet so many people in person that I have talked with over the years on the phone or via email. It was a very special day.

Sharing the afternoon with the families & friends of these men was amazing – wonderful, wonderful people. They shared great stories about the lads & how much the Manchester Regiment means to the history of their families.

Several families brought additional items to display, incredible treasures. I must confess, I felt like a kid in a candy store. Photographs I had never seen, personal items of the men, documents – great stuff!

Since I started this back in 2007 I must thank my friends here at themanchesters.org for your continued support & assistance. You’ve always been a great help, I appreciate it.

I will later post the displays I did up for the guys in the postcards & photos section.

I’ve attached four shots from the function:

An Honour Guard 292 Halifax Fairview Branch #142 Royal Canadian Air Cadet Squadron assists wreath layers Mary Hook & Clyde Cruickshanks. War Bride Mary is the widow of Sgt. Clary Hook 2nd Manchesters 1939-1946. Such a beautiful lady. Clyde is the son of Lance Corporal Clyde Cruickshanks 2nd Manchesters 1939-1945 (POW 1940-1945), KIA 11/27/1950 Korea 29th Battalion, Royal Ulster Rifles. Raised in Australia, this was Clyde’s first visit to his father’s hometown & country.

Fairview Legion Cenotaph

A couple of group shots

Thanks again for everything & I’ll talk with you soon.

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Wendi on August 30, 2011, 05:24:23 PM
How wonderful Dave !  WELL DONE  !

Thank you for your kind words, I am really looking forward to seeing the displays, and I'm sure the families not only got a great kick out of the Meet and Greet, but also a great sense of comfort.

Truly never forgotten.

Wendi  :)
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Robert Bonner on August 30, 2011, 05:25:49 PM
Dave.
That was obviously a great occasion.  There must have been such a lot of reminiscences ...and what a beautiful Legion Cenotaph.  It's great to know that the Manchester Regiment is still so well remembered in NS.
Robert

Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: rafboy on August 31, 2011, 09:57:00 AM
Wondeful to see the photos and hear of a special day.  Well done Dave.
Cliff
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on March 15, 2012, 02:24:37 AM
I've finally gotten around to post the displays for the men used in our 'Meet & Greet' in the Photos & Postcards by Battalion section under 'Halifax 100'.

I hope all is well with everyone.

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Robert Bonner on March 15, 2012, 10:48:36 AM
Dave.
What a splendid display in honour of the Halifax Hundred. They certainly will not be forgotten.
Very well done to all concerned in producing this piece of fascinating Canadian & Manchester Regiment history.

Very best wishes.
Robert
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on March 16, 2012, 04:28:28 AM
Thanks Robert. It's been a wonderful experience learning about these men - there's still so much more to discover. It is so important to remember...

Thanks again.

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: rafboy on March 16, 2012, 11:24:46 AM
What a great job you have done for the men.
Cliff
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: catharriet on May 21, 2012, 03:16:30 AM
It was a wonderful time!  Thanks Dave for putting this all together.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on May 29, 2012, 07:30:15 PM
In the ‘Photo & Postcards by Battalion’ section, under the ‘Halifax One Hundred’ heading I have posted several photographs (20) shared by the family of Sgt. Clary Hook taken in India 1942-1943 while Clary was stationed there serving with the 2nd Manchesters.

Now, these are shots of locations &/or local residents not regiment specific however they offer a wonderful glimpse into the sights & sounds of what our men encountered during their service in this exotic posting.

As no captions accompany the photographs I ask assistance from our experts to enlighten me as to where some of the locations shots may have been taken as well as where the regiment was posted during this time (1942-1943).

Beyond my interest in the Manchester Regiment during this period, my grandfather served in India in the 1890’s with the Rifle Brigade as did his younger brother from 1905 to 1913. I believe many of the sights encountered by the men in the 1940’s remained unchanged from the time of my grandfather & g-uncle. You’ll want to read Kipling after viewing them.

Thanks in advance as always.

Cheers,

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on November 27, 2012, 10:39:01 PM
Gerald Crouse who to the best of my knowledge was the last surviving '100' member passed away Sunday November 25, 2012 at the age of 95. I have attached his obituary from today’s Halifax Chronicle Herald.

Born in Italy Cross, NS Gerald along with friends Skip McCarthy & Arnold Carver enlisted in the 2nd Manchesters April 4th, 1939. Safely evacuated from Dunkirk Gerald transferred to the West Nova Scotia Regiment in 1941. Gerald’s war came to an end December 1943 at Ortona, Italy after suffering a serious head wound.

I had the privilege of talking with Gerald about his part as well as others in the '100' story & his input was invaluable. He shall be missed.

RIP Gerald

Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Robert Bonner on November 28, 2012, 10:51:57 AM

Dave,

As always very good to hear from you even when you are the bearer of sad news.
However I reckon that Gerald Crouse probably considered himself to have been fortunate in many ways, having achieved such a long life despite the serious wounds which he received in Italy with the West Nova Scotia Regiment in 1943.

Best wishes to you and yours for the festive season.

Robert
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on November 28, 2012, 05:57:38 PM
Thank you Robert & sincere wishes for your family as well. What I marvel at in Gerald's wonderful story of life is his 71 years of marriage to the same beautiful Yorkshire lass...

Here's a photo featuring Gerald taken at Ladysmith Barracks in 1939:
L-to-R Unknown, Arnold Carver, Earl Falkenham, Gerald Walker, Ric Serrick, Gerald Crouse, Carl Anderson

Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 16, 2013, 11:49:25 PM
I hope the New Year finds you all well. The past several months five additional families have been located in the '100' story.

One of these is that of Donald 'Donnie' Morrison. He enlisted March 1939, volunteered for the 5th (Ski) Battalion Scots Guards (Jan to March 1940) returned to the Manchesters when that unit disbanded & was later evacuated from Dunkirk June 1, 1940.

The family kindly shared today's attachment from Donnie's collection. Now, I don't know if this is a scanned newspaper article from the period or if it was copied from a book but I have seen the photograph before. In his own handwriting Don identifies the machine gunner on the right as himself & the other on the left as Gerald Walker from Dartmouth NS. Gerald also had enlisted in March 1939 & after Dunkirk remained with the 2nd Manchesters serving in Burma & India returning home in 1946. I have yet to locate his family.

At the time of Dunkirk I have both Gerald & Donnie serving in 'D' Company. Donnie was transferred to the Palestine Police Force in Sept 1941 where he served until returning home in the spring of 1945. He passed away in Halifax December 1999 at the age of 80.

As I mentioned, I'm sure I've seen this photo somewhere before - perhaps one of our experts has more details to add so I can share with Donnie's family.

Thanks in advance as always & look forward to hearing your thoughts

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 30, 2013, 03:11:44 AM
I came across the following link which features the photograph from my previous post:

http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205204879

The caption reads 'Vickers machine guns of 1/7th Manchester Regiment, 3rd Division, set up outside shops in St Pol, 8 March 1940.'

Don's family still has his paybook & he is in France during this time but the reference to the 1/7th Manchester Regiment, 3rd Division is confusing me. I'm pretty certain at the time of Dunkirk Don & Gerald Walker were with 'D' Company 2nd Manchesters which was 2nd Division I believe. The dates listed in his paybook for BEF service are as follows:

Sept 22 1939 - Feb 14 1940
March 2, 1940 - March 12, 1940
May 7, 1940 - June 1, 1940

We know he volunteered for the Ski Battalion Scots Guards in January 1940 & training for that unit took place in France & Scotland before being disbanded in March 1940. He did return to the Manchesters but how did he end up in the 1/7th?

Might the caption be incorrect about the unit? I would welcome your insight.

Thanks,

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Robert Bonner on January 30, 2013, 11:25:08 AM
Dave. You are quite correct.
The IWM have got it wrong!  The 7th Battalion were not part of the BEF and remained in the UK at that time on coastal defences. The only Manchester Regiment machine-gun battalions in France with the BEF were the 2nd and the 9th.  Everything points to the photograph being of men of the 2nd Bn.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 30, 2013, 01:36:17 PM
Thank you for the clarification Robert. One sad footnote to this photo (should the location of St Pol France be correct) Don's older brother & only sibling Flying Officer Air Bomber John Morrison 424 Squadron RCAF was shot down & killed on the morning of July 6, 1944 (Halifax Bomber). He & his six crewmates are buried at the St Pol War Cemetery.

Thanks again, I appreciate it.

Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: manchester48 on May 26, 2015, 06:17:05 PM
Hello Annie

Quite a few years later than your original post I am reading all about the Halifax Hundred and their involvement with the Manchester Regt.

Walter O'Hara married my Aunt Emily , nee Higham after his return from Singapore. My Uncle Eric (a.k.a. Edward "Teddy") was a friend of Walter and they returned together from Singapore to lodge at my grandparent's home at Gorton, Manchester, Lancashire.

I am only just learning about my Uncle Eric from the wonderful men on the Manchester Regiment Forum which I joined last week. Along with him I'm learning about his brother, Uncle Albert (a.k.a. Terence Higham) in the 2nd Regt and Walter.

Regards
Margaret
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on May 27, 2015, 04:43:35 PM
It's been far too long since my last posting but so happy you found us here Margaret as well as the FB '100' site. I've been looking so long for Walter's Canadian family to no avail so your post makes it seem like Christmas in May! Thanks for the clarification on Walter's POW photo - I had selected the incorrect one so some editing changes will be required. Much to share regarding Walter + so many questions.

Hope all my friends are well & we have a lot to catch up on - many wonderful photos & updates to share with you.
Title: Walter O'Hara
Post by: manchester48 on May 27, 2015, 06:58:08 PM
Hello Dave 1212

Thank you for the newspaper item you posted.  How interesting that he requested enquiries to be posted to my Aunty Emily!!

I'm just pleased I am able to return in a small way the help and guidance I've received from gentlemen on the Manchester Regiment Forum
My interest is with my Uncle Eric Higham, friend of Walter O'Hara and although I didn't know either of the men in question, - or Aunty Emily for that matter as I was born 1948- I will post below all the knowledge I have from my family tree and bits of information gathered from my Mum, Miriam - Walter's sister-in-law who is now 92.

'Emily Higham born 6 Sep 1919 at 15 Laurence Street, Gorton, Manchester. Married James Brown in 1936 and lived at 40 Phelan Street, Collyhurst, Manchester, Lancashire. James died from peritonitis following a perforated appendicitis.
Walter O'Hara return from Singapore with my Uncle Eric and they both lodged with my grandparents at the Gorton address above.
Emily & Walter married at Gorton Monastery, Gorton, Manchester in the December quarter of 1945 (all a bit hasty lol) and lived at the Phelan St address.
Walter sailed from Liverpool to Montreal, Canada 1946
Emily sailed from Southampton on SS Queen Elizabeth to New York, arriving 21.10.1946 - Destined to join husband, Walter Ernest O'Hara
Address: 66 Munford Road, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
I believe from what I've learned from Aunty Jean, Emily's youngest sister, that they had a daughter, ? Maureen and a son ? Robert and that Emily worked as a nurse in Canada and its said that Walter was with the Canadian Mounted Police though I can't confirm that.

Walter died 15 April 1996 in Fredericton, New Brunswick
Emily died in 2001 in New Brunswick.

That is all I have on record I'm afraid. Hope it helps you fill in some gaps.

Regards

Margaret


Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: manchester48 on May 27, 2015, 07:21:05 PM
Dave 1212

I'm new to this forum.  Can't find how to post a photo.  Can you help please. Got a pic of Walter, Emily and Aunty Jean on holiday in Maine.
Margaret
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on May 27, 2015, 07:22:18 PM
Thanks for the response & additional info Margaret. Our dates differ slightly on their dod's but it's fantastic stuff - thanks for clarifying the 'Brown' surname. I had Walter serving in the Royal Canadian Artillery after the war but with no firm dates it's quite probable he later went to the RCMP. The names of their children is welcome & gives me a direction to look though Maureen O'Hara might prove interesting lol.

Thank's again Margaret.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on May 27, 2015, 07:24:01 PM
Goto 'Addition Options' lower left in your Post Reply window & you'll see where to attach a file
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: charlie on May 27, 2015, 07:25:32 PM
Dave 1212

I'm new to this forum.  Can't find how to post a photo.  Can you help please. Got a pic of Walter, Emily and Aunty Jean on holiday in Maine.
Margaret

http://themanchesters.org/forum/index.php?topic=682.0
Expains how to upload a photo

Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: manchester48 on May 27, 2015, 07:31:56 PM
Thanks Dave. Here we go. This one is Aunty Emily left, Walter and Aunty Jean right
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: manchester48 on May 27, 2015, 07:34:14 PM
Second one is Aunty Emily with a man holding an Olympic torch but I don't know the dates of these pics. 
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on May 27, 2015, 07:45:57 PM
Wonderful photos - thank you so much for sharing them!
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: manchester48 on May 27, 2015, 07:55:12 PM
I'm afraid that, apart from my Mum, Miriam, all my relatives are deceased. As I mentioned the info I gave you about their time in Canada and the pics came via my niece who was in touch with Aunty Jean about 10 years ago but I can't confirm any of the dates for you.  They are all tentatively entered in the family tree with ?? at the side. If you do manage to find anything definite I'd very much appreciate you letting me know so I can verify the tree details.

Ad yes, Maureen O'Hara should be interesting.  I was told she was named after the film star!!!  Good luck with that one. lol
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: manchester48 on May 27, 2015, 07:56:20 PM
Thanks Charlie.  Simple when you know how eh
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: manchester48 on May 27, 2015, 08:23:17 PM
Find a Grave search - Forest Hill Cemetery, Fredericton. Grave stone DOD certainly different for Emily. 1999 not 2001. I shall amend my records accordingly.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 22, 2016, 07:33:57 PM
I hope everyone is well. I was wondering if to remain with this original post or start a new one with all of the updates & new info received over the past couple of years. I figure continuing where we left off.

A couple of years back it was recommended starting a Facebook page to reach more families. While not a FB fan, it seemed like a good idea - it has worked out & today we'll start with the most recent family to find us - that of Arthur John Caleb Smale from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

Arthur enlisted March 21, 1939. We have a photo of him from France 1940 which places him in 'A' Company yet post Dunkirk newspaper accounts have him in 'D' Company. He remained with the 2/Mancs & in December 1943 Sgt. Smale received an 'Emergency Commission' to that of 2nd Lieutenant. Newspaper accounts have him finishing the war as a Captain however a recently shared photo from August 1945 (Karachi) lists him as a Lieutenant (12th Frontier Force Regiment).

The family is still sorting through the documents they possess, so the questions posed here might soon answer themselves but just in case...
1) How long was Officer Training in cases like Arthur's & where would it have taken place knowing where they were stationed during this time period?
2) After training would the man return to his old unit or would he be re-assigned? Almost seems a waste taking a good NCO out of the line & not have him return.
3) Could Arthur have been at Kohima & Imphal with the 2/Mancs?

The first post features the August 1945 Karachi photo (in 3 attachments). The scan of the men isn't of the best quality but Arthur is 1st row standing, far right
Can anyone add detail to this unit (as well as 12th Frontier Force Regiment)?

Thanks in advance as always & more to follow...
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 23, 2016, 04:37:37 AM
Additional photos featuring Arthur Smale:

1) Various shots Ladysmith Barracks Spring 1939

2) Date/location of photo unknown. Private Smale back row, middle. No other men identified.

3) Shared several years ago by Thomas McCarthy's family + previously posted here, this photo was taken in France 1940 & has Tom McCarthy back row, far right. Tom you'll recall was KIA May 24, 1940 France age 25.

Just prior to this past Christmas, the family of William Frederick 'Bill/Chalkie' White identified him as standing back row, to Tom's right. After Dunkirk, Bill transferred to the RAF to be a pilot in Bomber Command. On a training flight September 3, 1942 Bill's plane crashed into a mountain in Scotland which killed his co-pilot. Seriously injured, lying in the open for 28 hours Bill was eventually rescued spending the next few months in hospital (Kingseat Hospital Abderdeenshire). He recovered, albeit with a permanent limp and resumed flight operations. Bill transferred from the RAF to RCAF prior to the end of the war or at least prior to returning to Canada. At RCAF Station Claresholm, Alberta on the morning of January 4, 1956 the Harvard II aircraft Flying Officer White was piloting crashed shortly after take-off. He was 37 years old.

Standing directly behind the Sergeant who is front middle, is Arthur Smale.

4) 2nd Lieutenant Arthur John Caleb Smale from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 23, 2016, 05:41:34 AM
Arthur's date of discharge from the ranks was December 11, 1943. This document is dated April 26, 1944 in Bombay. Does this mean Arthur completed the training or does it mean he is about to start it?
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 23, 2016, 04:02:05 PM
Photograph of Arthur Smale taken about a month prior to his passing in Ottawa, Ontario 1985 age 70. He rests in Saint Paul's Cemetery, Mushaboom, Nova Scotia.
RIP

Thanks again to Arthur's family for sharing these treasures & offering us a glimpse into his incredible life.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 23, 2016, 09:51:28 PM
Syd Goodman from Ferguson's Cove, Nova Scotia served in 'B' Company 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) from 1939-1946. These are a couple of items his family shared with us. Syd passed away December 2, 1998 age 78 & is buried Fort Massey Cemetery, Halifax, NS.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 24, 2016, 04:21:39 PM
These are the men currently identified in the 100 story who rose through the ranks & became Officer's by the end of the war in 1945.
L-to-R George O'Handley, Winston Ploeg, Arthur Smale, Noble Sproule, William White

Notes: Winston Ploeg resigned his Commission in 1946 reverting to the ranks later retiring as RSM of his regiment in the RCA in 1966.
Bottom photo of Bill White was taken shortly prior to his tragic death in 1956 age 37 RCAF Station Claresholm, Alberta.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on February 02, 2016, 07:38:46 PM
2/Mancs tug-of-war competition India 1943. Sgt. Clary Hook from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia front 2nd from the left is shown encouraging his team.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: timberman on February 02, 2016, 08:07:20 PM
Thanks for sharing Dave
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on February 16, 2016, 02:45:07 AM
A photo of Arnold Carver (from Italy Cross, Nova Scotia) taken in England August 1942 while he was serving in 'D' Company West Nova Scotia Regiment. In 1943 the unit shipped out with the 1st Canadian Division (3rd Infantry Brigade) & Arnold fought through Sicily & Italy before being wounded in Holland in 1945. At the time of his discharge later that year he held the rank of Acting Company Sergeant Major.

April 4, 1939 Arnold along with Skip McCarthy & Gerald Crouse enlisted in the 2/Mancs. All three men had served with the 75th Lunenburg Regiment. In 1936 this unit merged with the 69th Annapolis Regiment to forge what was to become the West Nova Scotia Regiment. Skip had created its new insignia.

With slim pickings available for steady employment in Nova Scotia at this time, the three friends travelled from the South Shore to Halifax when they heard men were being recruited in Halifax for the British Army.

After recruit training the friends were assigned to 'D' Company & sent to France after war was declared in September 1939.

In January 1940 Arnold along with Norm Eisener, Jack Foster, Don Morrison, G. Neville, Ric Serrick and Edward Vere-Holloway (perhaps others) volunteered for a new unit being created after the call for experienced skiers was circulated to all regiment commands & HQ’s. According to Don Morrison boredom of trench life in the front lines in France compounded by it being one of the coldest winters in recent memory motivated the men for the new challenge.

This unit was to become the 5th (Ski) Battalion Scots Guards. Nicknamed ‘The Snowballers’ its intent was to assist the Finns in their fight against the Russians. Lead by Lord Lovat, training took place in Scotland & France however following Finland’s armistice with Russia in March 1940, the unit was disbanded. Six of the seven soldiers (including Arnold) had returned to the trenches they have vacated a couple of months previously.

Evacuated from Dunkirk June 1940, Arnold transferred to the West Novas in 1941. Gerald Crouse came with him but Skip (along with Clyde Cruickshanks) had been captured May 26, 1940 in France performing rearguard actions.

Arnold ‘Slim’ Carver passed away December 26, 1988 in Bridgewater Nova Scotia. He was 69 years old.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on March 30, 2016, 04:48:13 PM
Glad & relieved this site was able to be saved with what I hope was minimal loss. Attached a photo from Art Rodgers collection that features two unidentified recruits taken at Ladysmith Barracks probably in the April/May 1939 timeframe.

What are the men wearing? Was this standard recruit issue? Any insight is appreciated as always. Thanks.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on April 06, 2016, 05:44:10 PM
This photograph was kindly shared by Billy Delaney's family. It shows Bill, back row 4th from the left, while with the Toronto Scottish Regiment (M.G.).  He transferred from the 2/Mancs in 1941.

Despite the condition issues, it's a wonderful shot. The soldiers from different units indicates it was probably a training course of some sort. There are men from the Manchester Regiment included so I'm thinking perhaps a course specific to machine gun battalions since Toronto Scots & Mancs (maybe others) are represented.

There are some names reportedly written on the back but I haven't seen them yet. No date indicated either so we don't know if this was pre/post Dieppe (Bill was there - August 19, 1942).

Thank you again to the Delaney Family for sharing this & I'll include any additional info once it becomes available.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: charlie on April 06, 2016, 07:36:59 PM
Dave,
Thanks for sharing the photo.

The three Sgts on the far left of the back row are all wearing what looks to be the ribbon of the 1939-45 Star. The Star was instituted on 8th July 1943 and the ribbons were available to wear by the end of 1943. This combined with the lack of leaves on the trees and some of them wearing gloves, leads me to believe the photo was probably taken at the end of 1943 - beginning of 1944.

Charlie
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on April 06, 2016, 07:56:45 PM
Thanks Charlie - I appreciate that. I'm hoping to receive a scan of the back of the photo shortly to hopefully add some more names to the mix. Cheers.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on April 07, 2016, 04:06:30 AM
Just received this from Bill's daughter. Some of the names difficult to read but it does show some of the regiments involved including the 1st Manchesters.

Perhaps someone might recognize a name?

When did the 1st Battalion reform?

Thanks again to Catherine for sharing this with us.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: charlie on April 07, 2016, 09:56:51 AM
Hello Dave,
Thanks for posting the reverse. I had a look at the names and Sgt RA Gosselin TSR was KiA in France on 25.07.1944:

http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/2059169/GOSSELIN,%20ROBERT%20ANDREW

So the photo cannot be any later.

The 1st Bn was reconstituted in June 1942.

Charlie
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on April 07, 2016, 12:25:47 PM
Thanks Charlie. Generally when I receive 'new' names the first place I visit is CWGC hoping I do not locate their names there.  I haven't had the opportunity yet with these names so the discovery of Robert Andrew Gosselin is very sad. I do hope no other names from this list are there. Six other soldiers from the Toronto Scots were also killed that day (July 25, 1944) along with Sgt. Gosselin.

Prior to receiving this list, in addition to Bill, I had two other lads identified as Toronto Scots - both back row, chap middle in white + the lad 4th from the right. Often the Canadian Virtual War Memorial offers additional info to that of CWGC such as photographs & for Gosselin it displays his grave but nothing else so unfortunately we can't make a positive ID.

I think your initial observation of when the photograph was taken still stands. Based on the other units listed - machine gunners course of some sort?

Thanks again.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on April 23, 2016, 03:10:48 AM
It was for his heroic actions April 23, 1944 (72 years ago today) near Cerreto Alto, Italy that resulted in S/Sgt. Daniel Serrick 2-1 1st Special Service Force (Black Devil's/Devil's Brigade) from Jollimore, Nova Scotia (enlisted 2/Mancs September 21, 1938) being posthumously awarded the American Silver Star for Gallantry March 29, 1945.

The Silver Star citation:

Leading a patrol within enemy firing range, while attempting to rescue a wounded comrade, Staff Sergeant Serrick left his patrol in the protection of a canal and began the search with the assistance of a medical aid man who being unarmed caused Staff Sergeant Serrick also to go weaponless. Proceeding across flat mine-covered terrain towards enemy positions, the two men were suddenly fired upon by a machinegun, which wounded the aid man.
Staff Sergeant Serrick, in the face of a hail of machinegun bullets, assisted the wounded man to the protection of the canal. He then returned to the field alone and continued the search while enemy artillery fired around him. Returning at darkness to his patrol, he went out a third time and did not return until convinced that the search was in vain.
During subsequent operations in Italy, Staff Sergeant Serrick was killed as a result of enemy action. His inspiring courage, loyalty and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the military services.

End of Citation.

Dannie was KIA May 29, 1944 age 23 & is buried Beach Head War Cemetery, Anzio, Italy. The family received the medal in a simple ceremony held at the American Consulate in Halifax, Nova Scotia February 12, 1947.
Always Remembered...
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on April 25, 2016, 07:27:22 PM
This is a wonderful photograph of Cecil Laurence 'Pat' Duffey from Halifax, Nova Scotia. He enlisted in the 2/Mancs April  28,1939. After being wounded in France May 1940 Pat transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment in 1941. He served in Sicily & Italy where his war ended after being wounded a fifth time. He was still recovering from his injuries when he returned to Halifax in the Spring of 1945.

While training with the RCR in Scotland Pat met Margaret Woods & they later married in Halifax, NS November 1946. Bill Delaney was his best man & I must thank the Delaney Family once again for kindly sharing this photo from their collection.

After the war Pat served with the Halifax Fire Department for 34 years. He passed away May 28, 1981 age 61 & is buried Gates of Heaven Cemetery, Lower Sackville, NS.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on April 26, 2016, 05:29:39 PM
When I was delving further into Sgt. Gosselin's story, from a couple of posts ago, I inadvertently came across information that places another '100' member in the Toronto Scottish Regiment (M.G.).

Thomas H. Nolan along with Carl Anderson & Thomas McCarthy ('A' Company KIA May 21, 1940 France) all from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia enlisted in the 2/Mancs April 12, 1939. Evacuated from Dunkirk, Thomas & Carl Anderson transferred to the Toronto Scottish July/August 1941. Serving in 'D' Company Cpl. Nolan was wounded July 26, 1944 south of Caen. He had returned home by the Spring of 1945.

Though unconfirmed, I believe Thomas passed away in 1995 age 75 & is buried Holy Cross Cemetery, Halifax, NS.

Carl Anderson survived the war. He later settled in Boston, Mass. & we're still attempting to piece together his final years.

This brings the number to 5 of the men who have been identified as transferring to the Toronto Scottish from the 2/Mancs - Thomas Nolan, Carl Anderson, Bill Delaney, Art Rodgers & Mel Coppell.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on July 06, 2016, 07:46:50 PM
This is another wonderful scan from the family of Syd Goodman taken at Ladysmith Barracks no date but I believe between May - July 1939.

There's 168 men & with so many Canadians included, it's a great shot. I still have to place all identified (& there's many) onto paper but I'm hoping families of the British soldiers featured might see there family members. Also should anyone recognize the NCO's & Officers, that would be fantastic as well.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Robert Bonner on July 07, 2016, 10:26:09 AM

What a splendid photograph.  I can identify the senior members present.

Seated centre is Major GL (Bill) Usher.  Sitting on his left is Regimental Sergeant Major Allen.
Sitting on Major Usher's right is Company Sergeant Major L Allison, and next to him is that renowned soldier Sergeant Joe Stridgeon DCM.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on July 07, 2016, 04:51:08 PM
Thank you Robert. RSM Allen's name has actually come up from a couple of the families. Don Morrison (March '39 - 3rd row from the top, 8th from the left) wrote down some of his memories in later life & also mentions him (in high esteem). The introduction to these other men you identified means a great deal.

The earliest recruits I see here are from Feb '39 & the latest are from May '39. I don't see any of the '38 lads so would you agree with the May to July '39 likelihood as the time of the shot?

Thanks again Robert.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on July 08, 2016, 05:53:11 AM
Another from Syd Goodman's collection, this is an exercise book for a Private E. Martindale. He's not on my list as one of the '100' so I'm assuming he's a British mate of Syd's (March '39 - 3rd row from the top, 13th from the right in photo). I would also assume that he (Martindale) might very well be in the photo. Perhaps his name might be familiar to someone. 
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Robert Bonner on July 08, 2016, 11:42:33 AM

Dave.
I think that May - June is more accurate.  In pages 48/49 of Ladysmith Baracks 1845 - 1958 there is a photograph of the Canadian Intake which is dated  24 May 1939. They were obviously now trained soldiers and ready for posting.  This new photo from Syd Goodman's collection shows the entire Recruit Company, possibly ready for their passing out parade at the end of basic training. Probably taken at about the same time.

In the text there is an item "Walter O'Hara, one of the Canadians, wrote in the July edition of the Regimental Journal.....My squad goes to Aldershot next month to join the 2nd Battalion."     Allowing for the inevitable delay between writing this and the publishing date of July I think that it is safe to assume that he wrote this in either late May or June.

Incidentally what a lot of boy soldiers squatting in the front row.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on July 08, 2016, 04:08:59 PM
Thanks Robert, the timeframe does make sense though the Walter O'Hara reference (the 1st recruit in the story) would have been from 1938. He enlisted Feb. 24, 1938 & his 'Recruit for the Regiment' letter was from July of that year. The flow of Canadians started after Walter's best friend Bill Adams arrived in August 1938. The cruel twist is that when Bill arrived in England, instead of 2nd Battalion Walter had been shipped to 1st Battalion & the two friends never got to serve together - Bill was KIA May 1940 France.

The May 24, 1939 photo of the 41 Canadians is one of my favourites. I have attached an improved scan of the exercise yard photo which features the same 41 men. It's brilliant to have the same people involved in two different settings. Being Empire Day, perhaps a matched set to show how these Canadians were already doing their bit.

Included in the front row of boy soldiers from the previous group photo are two 22 year olds - Gerald Crouse 3rd from left & Billy Delaney 6th from the right. Neither looks happy with the seating arrangements...

Thanks again Robert.

(I have placed names to the majority of faces in this photo.)
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on September 27, 2016, 08:05:18 PM
S/Sgt Daniel 'Dannie' Serrick (2-1) 1st Special Service Force KIA May 29, 1944 age 23.

Born September 1920 Jollimore, Nova Scotia.
Enlisted 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) ('B' Company)
September 21, 1938 (one of the 'Halifax 100').
Evacuated from Dunkirk May 31, 1940.
3 Troop No.5 Commando Jan-Oct 1941.
'C' Squadron 8th Canadian Recce Regiment (14th Canadian Hussars) 1941-1942.
2nd Company, 1st Regiment 1st Special Service Force 1942-1944
(arrived Helena. Montana December 1942).
Earned British (Ringway), Canadian (Fort Benning) & US (Helena) jump wings. 
Buried Beach Head War Cemetery, Anzio, Italy (XVII.A.3)
Posthumously awarded Silver Star for Gallantry - action dated April 23, 1944 near Cerreto Alto, Italy.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on October 01, 2016, 09:08:26 PM

Note: Skip McCarthy was born October 6, 1909 & it seems fitting to repost his story as we draw closer to his birthday - remembering this artist/soldier who created such an iconic insignia that means so much to so many, past & present.

It was 80 years ago in 1936 when Francis William 'Skip' McCarthy designed the West Nova Scotia Regiment insignia. His 75th Lunenburg Regiment had merged with the 69th Annapolis Regiment & Skip's superiors, knowing of his artistic background & talent, tasked him to create the insignia for the new unit. (See attachment).

The difficult economic reality of the 1930’s frustrated many militia members in their failed attempts to join the regular army. When word reached Skip that men were being recruited in Halifax for the British Army he and two other West Nova ‘originals’ Arnold ‘Slim’ Carver and Gerald Crouse (both from Italy Cross, NS) headed for the city.

Successfully passing an interview and physical they were soon on their way to England. They enlisted in the 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) April 4, 1939. After war was declared, the 2/Mancs, the Divisional Machine Gun Battalion in the British 2nd Division left England reaching Cherbourg, France September 23, 1939. Stationed on the Maginot Line near the Belgium border they waited in the trenches they had dug for the inevitable German attack which finally commenced May 10, 1940.

Attached to 'D' Company, Skip served in a platoon with fellow Nova Scotian Clyde Cruickshanks as well as his mates Arnold Carver and Gerald Crouse. On May 26, 1940, performing rear guard actions that allowed others to proceed to the beaches of Dunkirk, Skip's platoon, after bitter fighting was overrun by superior German forces and forced to surrender. Arnold and Gerald managed to escape but Skip had been wounded in the leg and he along with Clyde became POWs ending up at Stalag XXA (located just south of the town of Thorun in Poland).

Years of forced manual labour, meager rations in squalid conditions compounded by diseases like jaundice and dysentry even the heartiest of men suffered. In January 1945 the Germans began the infamous 'Long March' of the already weakened POW’s towards Germany in order to flee the advancing Russians. In one of the coldest winters in years, the POWs were marched 20-40 km a day through 2 or 3 feet of snow and sub-freezing temperatures. Frost bite was severe and many died from disease. Shootings and beatings of those unable to keep up were frequent.

Their eventual liberation by American forces in April 1945 came too late for Skip – his health had failed. Repatriated home to Nova Scotia Skip was unable to resume a normal life. He passed away at the Nova Scotia Sanatorium in Kentville August 7th, 1947 from TB contracted while a POW. Skip was 38 years old. He is buried at the Trinity Anglican Cemetery, Liverpool NS.

Lest We Forget
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on December 21, 2016, 01:49:17 PM
Syd Goodman 'B' Company 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) from Ferguson's Cove, Nova Scotia recorded where he spent the seven Christmas' away from home.  He was 18 when he left Halifax in February 1939. His joy of being reunited with his family for Christmas 1946 must have been tempered by the fact his older brother Jack was absent having died while a POW 'H' Force Thailand/Burma Railway July 3, 1943 (9th Coast Regiment RA).

Syd's list:
Christmas 1939 Le Mans, France
Christmas 1940 Malton, Yorkshire, England
Christmas 1941 Moreton-in-Marsh, Gloucestershire, England
Christmas 1942 Poona (Pune), India
Christmas 1943 Belgaum, India
Christmas 1944 Kalewa, Burma
Christmas 1945 Birmingham, England

Syd passed away December 2, 1998 Halifax NS age 78. Buried Fort Massey Cemetery, Halifax, NS.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on November 01, 2017, 12:28:43 PM
Halifax Hundred Deceased

Top Row L-to-R
Private William ‘Bill’ Douglas Adams from Halifax/Antigonish, Nova Scotia 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) KIA sometime between May 10th & May 19th, 1940 in France. Buried Dunkirk Town Cemetery (Plot 2 Row 4 Grave 44), France age 22.

Lance Corporal Sydney Leonard Barwick from Winnipeg, Manitoba 44th Royal Tank Regiment RAC died while POW at P.G. 202 (hospital camp) Lucca, Italy April 14, 1943. Buried Florence War Cemetery, Italy (I.E.2.) age 33.

Private Carl Robert Coulstring from Halifax, Nova Scotia 'C' Company, 8th (H.D.) Battalion, Cheshire Regiment  killed March 12, 1941 during a Luftwaffe bombing raid on Merseyside, England March 12, 1941. Buried Birkenhead (Landican) Cemetery (Sec. 6 Grave H.3.), England age 23.

Lance Corporal Clyde Cruickshanks from Halifax, Nova Scotia 29th Brigade, 1st Battalion Royal Ulster Rifles KIA November 27, 1950. Buried at the UN Memorial Cemetery Pusan, Korea age 32. POW 1940-1945 Stalag XX-A (2/Mancs).

Middle Row L-to-R
Gunner John 'Jack' Claydon Goodman from Ferguson's Cove, Nova Scotia 9th Coast Regiment Royal Artillery died while POW (cholera) July 3, 1943 at Tonchan South Camp (Thailand- Burma Railway) (captured Singapore Feb 15, 1942). Buried Kanchanaburi War Cemetery, (6.A.40), Thailand age 28.

Private Francis William 'Skip' McCarthy from Liverpool, Nova Scotia 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) died at the Nova Scotia Sanatorium in Kentville NS August 7th, 1947 from TB contracted while a POW at Stalag XXA (1940-1945 Thorun, Poland). Buried at the Trinity Anglican Cemetery, Liverpool NS age 38. Designed West Nova Scotia Regiment insignia.

Private Thomas McCarthy from Dartmouth, Nova Scotia  'A' Company Anti-Aircraft Gunner, 2nd Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) KIA May 21, 1940 near Pas de Calais, France. Buried Dunkirk Town Cemetery (Plot 2 Row 7 Grave 2), France age 25.

Private Harold Morris from Armdale, Nova Scotia 3 Petrol Field Depot RASC died while POW Stalag XX-B Malbork, Poland December 26, 1944. No known grave. Remembered with Honour Dunkirk Memorial (Column 141) age 31.

Flying Officer David Albert Alton Romans DFC from Melville Cove, Nova Scotia 90 Squadron RAF KIA September 8, 1941 near Bygland, Norway. Buried Bygland Churchyard Cemetery, Norway age 21.

Bottom Row L-to-R
Pilot Officer Donald Sprague Ross from Edmundston, New Brunswick 54 Squadron RAF KIA May 15, 1940. Buried Woodstock Methodist Cemetery, Woodstock, NB age 22.

Lance Corporal Ross Samuel 'Sock' Rutherford from Schomberg, Ontario 8th Infantry Brigade Company RCASC 3rd Canadian Division died accidentally August 3, 1945. Buried Holten Canadian War Cemetery The Netherlands (V.F.5) age 31.

S/Sgt Daniel 'Dannie' Serrick from Jollimore, Nova Scotia 2nd Company First Regiment (2-1) 1st Special Service Force (Black Devils/Devil's Brigade) KIA May 29, 1944 near Artena, Italy. Buried Beach Head War Cemetery (XVII.A.3) Anzio, Italy age 23.

Flying Officer William Frederick 'Bill/Chalkie' White from Halifax, Nova Scotia RCAF died when the Harvard II aircraft he was piloting crashed RCAF Station Claresholm, Alberta January 4, 1956 age 37. Buried Claresholm Cemetery, Alberta.

Lest We Forget
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on November 02, 2017, 04:15:59 AM
A friend was visiting the Legion in Chester, Nova Scotia when he noticed these medals on display. They belong to Richard Osbourne Frail, one of the '100' that I had no information on. On the right, is a photograph of Richard taken at Ladysmith Barracks March 1939.

All we know so far is that he was born August 5, 1911 in Chester, Nova Scotia son of Harris & Grace Frail. He died April 9, 1955 in Chester of a cerebral hemorrhage age 43. He was married at the time however I have yet to discover his wife's name or if they had any children.

Based on the medals, it looks like he remained with the British Army for the duration of the war. Further investigation is needed to fill in the gaps of his story.

A wonderful find nevertheless!
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Wendi on November 02, 2017, 09:01:45 AM
As you say Dave a great find!

Wendi
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on July 16, 2018, 12:46:58 AM
Walter O'Hara 1st Battalion Manchester Regiment (M.G.) 1938-1946

Brilliant photograph of the 1st recruit in the '100' story.

Walter's family recently found us & have shared a treasure trove of items. We already knew upon his return to Canada Walter almost immediately signed up with the RCA, which considering his nearly four years of brutal Japanese captivity is in itself remarkable but we have also learned that he later volunteered & served in the Korean War with the 2nd Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery.
Maureen writes of her father's career:
' Dad was a journalist writing articles for military papers mostly. He was President of the Korean Veterans Association for many years and received many commendations for his bridging the gap between the US state of Maine Korean Vets and New Brunswick vets, engaging in joint charitable activities. I am realizing I am not in chronological order so I will say this he spent 32 years in the military - The Royal Canadian Artillery as an Instructor - after Camp Shilo we went to Montreal then to Fredericton where he taught militia until he retired. He then took employment at the University of NB carpentry shops until his final retirement at 65. Dad died at age 76 at the DVA in Fredericton, NB.'

Pretty impressive for a lad who endured the tough upbringing at St. Patrick's Home for Boys in Halifax, Nova Scotia yet successfully fulfilled his dream of joining the British Army.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: sphinx on July 16, 2018, 11:48:30 AM
Dave,

Great Photo.

Could you tell me the photographers location as impressed at the foot of the photo please.

regards
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on July 16, 2018, 12:43:10 PM
Can't make it out based on the scan I received but I'll check with Maureen to see if she can read it from the original.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on July 16, 2018, 12:44:15 PM
1/Mancs Corps of Drums

Arthur Lane wrote of Walter:
' He came as a duty man (a private soldier) and fancied his hand at becoming a musician, unfortunately he could not read music so he was put in the drum section where I was serving as a drummer. In other words, a purveyor of music via bugle fife and drum. Walter was not very musically minded and was given a Timpani side drum to learn to play.'

Walter is standing far right in the photo. He is the only soldier we can ID though I suspect Arthur Lane is also here.

Is there a listing of the men in this photo?
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on July 18, 2018, 04:23:59 PM
Another nice photo. Walter O'Hara on the left with unidentified mate on the right. No date but I suspect 1940/41 Malaya.
Title: Re: Halifax Hundred 1938-1946
Post by: Dave1212 on January 11, 2019, 03:45:59 AM
Update for another '100' soldier - Ernest Frederick 'Fred Rampton